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Tuba 24: Who has built this DIY sub?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by angelopb, Oct 22, 2004.


  1. I am thinking about buying the plans for this and building it with some experienced friends. I am just looking for the experiences people have had during construction and appropriate skill levels. Also, would like to know how it sounds besides the few reviews I read.

    If I paid somebody to precut to plans, what would I still be looking at in terms of equipment and labor?
     
  2. JehuJava

    JehuJava Bass Frequency Technician

    Oct 15, 2002
    Oakland, CA
    I would like to know also. Any negatives on this design? I've read only positives responses.

    Al
     
  3. Jim Ingraham

    Jim Ingraham

    Nov 14, 2002
    Shillington
    OK Ill share some of my Tuba experiences with you. First as far as construction goes... you cant really have all the pieces precut as they are sized by dead reckoning based upon the guide lines you draw on the first side. Its a pretty simple and intuitive process really but its probably better to cut a piece, install it, measure then cut the next piece. The most important thing is to rip all your widths at one time at the same table saw setting. This is what it looks like about half way thru the project:
    [​IMG]

    When i was finished with mine, i didnt have the HL10 speaker yet so i thru in an Eden 10 driver i had laying around. Frankly i wasnt to impressed with the output and it sounded very honky. Now this is with no crossover so it was running full range but i was still kinda bummed out, so i set it aside fer a few weeks. When the HL10 arrived and was installed however the Tuba is a whole nuther story. I still dont have a crossover installed but now the bass is very deep and tactile. You feel it as much as hear it.
    Im using my Tuba with our PA, not my rig. I think its a bit of overkill for backline use. Im powering it with 300 watts from one side of my PLX.
     
  4. McHack

    McHack

    Jul 29, 2003
    Central Ohio!
    So, I'm getting the feeling that, this really isn't a full range, stand alone bass cab design then... Correct?
     
  5. Some assembly required.
    Work bench, drills, saws, screws, wood, wires, driver, pastoral woodshop, vices and caulking sold seperately.
     
  6. Jim, would you mind posting a few more photos if you have them?

    Your tip for ripping all widths at the same setting is one that should be emphasized again for newbie wood smiths. It prevents a huge number of ills, and show-stopping problems.

    Have you built a Tuba 30 by chance?
     
  7. sorry if thsi is dumb but wats a tuba
     
  8. BigRed

    BigRed

    Apr 1, 2004
    Palestine, TX
    I've got the plans and am about to start this project. I'm excited and intimidated all at the same time. This should be fun...
     
  9. BigRed

    BigRed

    Apr 1, 2004
    Palestine, TX
  10. Jim Ingraham

    Jim Ingraham

    Nov 14, 2002
    Shillington
    I posted 4 more pics in my gallery here:http://www.talkbass.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=27853

    Havent built a 30 dont see a need unless your doing pro sound for outdoor events. One Tuba 24 is plenty of sub for med size bars and small outdoor places i play.

    @McHack: this is definately not a full range speaker.

    One other note about my Tuba.. while it only weighs 70 lbs or so... its a rather akward shape to pick up..low, wide and heavy. I hurt my back the day i finished it while picking it up to carry in the house. Any Tuba bigger than the 24 will be a 2 man carry.
     

  11. It is a 10" sub that wil give you output of two 18" subs in a ported cab. it is more bass than you are ready for, or will need. But it is the bass you want.

    Although a dedicated sub, it eats other bass cabs for lunch in the 20hz-100hz dept (except the Shroeder 1210), according to what I have been reading.

    It reminds me of a scene in a Sean Connery movie where he warns this big bald biker dude that he will kick his arse with his "left thumb", warning that his right thumb was much too powerful for him.

    Tuba 24, the single 10", is the "Sean Connery Left Thumb" of dedicated compact bass cabs. The Tuba 30 12" design is his right thumb..
     
  12. JehuJava

    JehuJava Bass Frequency Technician

    Oct 15, 2002
    Oakland, CA
    Ha ha ha ha :D
     
  13. I emailed the flitesound people to see if they sell their high tech composite board for DIY. I am wondering how it cuts. Something tells me it is probably easy to cut, but very messy. You probably need to wear a respirator too. But it supposedly has great acoustical properties and is 50% of the weight, which would make the Tuba 24 VERY trick and portable.
     
  14. JehuJava

    JehuJava Bass Frequency Technician

    Oct 15, 2002
    Oakland, CA
    What makes the Flitesound material so special...sounds interesting.
     
  15. http://www.flitesound.com/home/default.asp

    They are just lightweight and high tech. It used to be owned by a dude named, Kurt, who has since sold out to some new people. I like the idea of having a lightweight cab that moves air like a heavy cab. I have been eyeing that tube amp/15 rig for awhile.
     
  16. orskard

    orskard

    Mar 17, 2004
    Indiana
  17. Jim,

    Thanks much for the updated photos.

    I bought the Tuba 24 plans, but had a question about how the baffle board was mounted. It appears to just be a snug fit, glue 'n screw into the horn panels. I figure I would probably cleat the baffle on the chamber side for additional mounting strength. I'm also leaning strongly toward 3/4" material for the baffle panel.

    Bill is a great cheer leader for his design, but I'm curious about what your "real world" observations are, specific to playing live electric bass. I figure to bi-amp the Tuba 24 with a pair of B102 for the highs.
     
  18. JehuJava

    JehuJava Bass Frequency Technician

    Oct 15, 2002
    Oakland, CA
    I also just bought the plans. While they specify the use of dead reckoning I still find them a little ambiguitous (especially regarding the baffle). Although the more I study them and re-read them I think I am understanding.

    I am also leaning towards 3/4 inch wood...for the sides, top, and bottom. What would be the benefit for using 3/4" for the baffle?

    What do you mean by cleat? "L" shaped brackets on the inside of the chamber?

    Alan
     
  19. JehuJava

    JehuJava Bass Frequency Technician

    Oct 15, 2002
    Oakland, CA
    Another question.

    Jim's photos don't show any of the horn plates screwed together. Are they held together by adhesive only? I do see screws for the baffle and supports.

    Alan
     
  20. The baffle board takes the most pounding from the driver, and is the most weak point, due to the large cut out for the driver. This leaves a small amount of material on the board.

    For my big cabs, I like to use 1" for the baffle when the cutout area consumes most of the baffle area.

    Cleats are standard wood assembly techniques. They are blocks, typically 3/4 x 3x4 by X length. They are reinforcment blocks glued/screwed at the junction of a butt joint. They add a whole lot of strength and stiffness to an otherwise weak joint.