Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Tune a guitar to itself?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Syxx870621345, Mar 23, 2002.


  1. My old guitarist used to always say that you could tune your guitar to "itself". And then it would sound better and even stay in tune longer.
    If anyone's ever heard of this please explain, or send a link to where I could find out myself.
    Thanx

    chris
     
  2. old_skool

    old_skool

    Aug 17, 2000
    Milwaukee, WI
    I think they may have meant that if you get your lowest string ( E ) in tune and tune the others according to that it would be in tune with 'itself' better. IE 5th fret harmonic E string and 7th fret harmonic A string or 5th fret E and open A.
     
  3. He always said that you had to do it with the bridge, and messing with those things(whatever their called)
     
  4. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    Do you mean setting up intonation?
     
  5. um... maybe, he might not have known what he was talking about(or just named it wrong). But in any case, yea sure, how do you do that?
     
  6. He may have had a B.C. Rich or a Jackson (there are others bvut i am not sure who al makes them) where you tighten the strings to almost in tune. Then lock the strings down with a lamp on the headstock side of the nut with a clamp. Then you have fine tuners at the bridge. I have only seen this on guitars and not bass but it may exist on bass as well. It is supose to be superior to just tuning with the tuners on the headstock and is meant to compete with headless guitars.
     
  7. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    Setting up intonation has nothing to do with locking vibrato systems and finetuners.

    Intonation:

    Play the harmonic at the 12th fret, e.g. on the G string, and tune it.
    Then play the fretted note at that fret. If that tone is sharp, move the bridge saddle away from the neck. If it's flat, move it towards the neck.
    Repeat until both notes are in tune.

    Repeat for every string.

    On a sidenote: Most locking vibrato systems (e.g. Floyd Rose) have finetuners so that you can tune the string without unlocking the lock at the nut and to enable compensating the change in tuning caused by locking the nut, which usually makes the string go sharp.
     
  8. I know that intonation has nothing to do with the locking vibrato system (although i didnt know thats what it is called). I meant that may have been what the original posters guitarist was taling about and not about intonation.