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Twisted neck on a Pentabuzz?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by amerbs38, Mar 8, 2016.


  1. amerbs38

    amerbs38 Supporting Member

    Jan 15, 2012
    Santa Cruz, CA
    I just sold and had returned a 2005 Pedulla Pentabuzz (on Reverb). The buyer said the neck was twisted so that the treble is bowed and the bass side is not, causing buzz and deadening in the higher and lower registers. I played it and set it up before selling it and it seemed fine to me but I`m sure he didn`t make it up (I take returns for any reason). I can kind of see some bow down towards the bridge but it doesn't seem like enough to worry about. I`ve loosened the strings and put the truss rod to neutral to let the thing rest for awhile before I re-adjust everything. Anyway, I`m wondering when is a neck twisted enough to be a problem? (can`t see myself sanding down this kind of fingerboard). Thanks for any input.
     
  2. Maybe he changed his mind and decided that would be the excuse he would use. Maybe set the string heights the same near the neck off the body and see how the strings on each side look further up the neck in different places and see if the heights off the fret's are the same on the E side and the G side. If they are equal I would think that you don't have twist. If you have a major difference between both sides of the neck you may have a problem. You may want to slide something flat and even at the first fret under the strings to act as a zero fret to compensate for differences in nut slot heights also. Just an idea that popped into my head, I've never done this, but it seems logical. I really don't think it would be much of an issue unless it was really out to lunch, but some people are like that. Pedullas are a bit on the pricey side so any issues at all could really deter some folks. Oh I just noticed the word penta so I guess its a five string so substitute B for E string! Also probably a fretless but everything still applies! Actually a better idea may to put something as a zero fret at each end of the neck and check the heights in different places. That would take the body out of the equation.
     
  3. amerbs38

    amerbs38 Supporting Member

    Jan 15, 2012
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Thanks for the info! I`ll set it up and check it out
     
    Jbass1979 likes this.
  4. amerbs38

    amerbs38 Supporting Member

    Jan 15, 2012
    Santa Cruz, CA
    OK it looks like there is actually a tad more relief on the G string, maybe a slight hump right around the 24th fret, but it`s not something I probably would have ever noticed and when set up it plays fine for me. I`ll mention all this when I go to sell it FWIW...Thanks again
     
    1stnamebassist likes this.
  5. Sure. Glad it helped.
     
  6. 202dy

    202dy Supporting Member

    Sep 26, 2006
    It is not unusual for a neck to exhibit differing amounts of relief on the bass and treble sides of the neck. It is unfortunate that most people do not understand this and view it as a defect.

    It is not usually a problem.
     
  7. Turnaround

    Turnaround Commercial User

    May 6, 2004
    Toronto Canada
    Independent Instrument Technician, and Contractor to Club Bass and Guitar - Toronto
    To add to that, differing amounts of relief on the bass and treble sides does not necessarily indicate a twist. It may have a twist, but it is just as likely that it doesn't.
     
  8. JustForSport

    JustForSport

    Nov 17, 2011
    A great reason for 2 truss rods on 5 strings and up- each side independently adjustable. Uneven string tension across the neck can be compensated for.
     
  9. 202dy

    202dy Supporting Member

    Sep 26, 2006
    Or you can dial in differing amounts of relief on either side of the neck.
     
  10. I like the dual rods on my Rick. Just as easy to tweak as a single rod really. And the neck is solid as a rock. Its stays put where you set it.
     
  11. davelowell2

    davelowell2 Uhh... FaFaFooey is BaBaBooey... Supporting Member

    Apr 20, 2006
    NYC via StL
    @Turnaround Will you please elaborate on this? I have a bass like this and I'm wondering if I should do anything about. Sorry about the hijack...
     
  12. My American Special Precision neck is flat on the treble side, and .005" relief on the bass side.
    Absolutely perfect neck. Almost as if Fender designed it that way.
     
  13. Turnaround

    Turnaround Commercial User

    May 6, 2004
    Toronto Canada
    Independent Instrument Technician, and Contractor to Club Bass and Guitar - Toronto
    A twist in a neck does not necessarily result in differing amounts of relief on opposite sides of the neck. It's entirely possible to have both sides truly flat but have a twist. Assuming that the neck was made truly flat end-to-end, the wood may distort over time from the stress of the strings, reaction to changing environment, etc. That distortion may occur in each plane of the wood, and because wood is not homogenous, the distortion may not be uniform throughout the piece. The result may be that you encounter a little more relief on one side of the neck than the other. But that doesn't mean there's a twist. Just differing degrees of lengthwise bend.

    If your question is how to determine if there is a twist in your neck, use the "winding stick" method. Lat a straightedge across the back of the headstock and sight from the headstock towards the body. The straightedge should be parallel to the back of the body:

    Twist.JPG

    This one is straight.
     
    1stnamebassist likes this.
  14. FirewalZ

    FirewalZ

    Aug 14, 2014
    S.E. Michigan
    I recently bought a 1986 MIJ Fender Jazz.....it has slightly more relief under the G than the E, it does not really affect the playability, otherwise the bass is near perfect condition. I got a great deal so don't really care much, however if I was dropping a grand or so on a bass, I would be a lot less accepting of something like that.
     
  15. Turnaround

    Turnaround Commercial User

    May 6, 2004
    Toronto Canada
    Independent Instrument Technician, and Contractor to Club Bass and Guitar - Toronto
    You might then be a lot less accepting of a great bass then that was designed with a little more relief under the G than the E string. That's what I would aim for since the G string is usually set lower and needs a little more room for excursion. Having an equal amount of relief side to side is not a good measure of quality.
     
    202dy and FunkHead like this.

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