Twisted Neck!

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by rickreyn, Jan 8, 2001.

  1. rickreyn

    rickreyn Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    I've got a Warwick Corvette Standard 5-String. It is about three months old. My guitar tech noted a slight twist in the neck when setting it up. He said solving one problem on one side of the neck will lead to buzzing on the other. It is set up with comfortable action now, but in his opinion should go no lower. He said it was nothing to worry about. My question is: Is this seen as a terminal problem in terms of resale, or do most basses in this price range suffer from this problem? In reality, you can't really hear that there is a problem. And it does not hinder my playing.
  2. pkr2


    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Rick, you might check out the warrantee status. Three months old is way too quick for a neck to start showing signs of twisting.

    Even though your bass may play acceptably now, neck twist has a nasty way of getting worse over time. I would be very careful not to let the warrantee period run out before bringing it to the manufacturers attention. At least that will document the date of failure.

    I have to wonder if you bought the bass locally or by mailorder. If it was bought locally, the dealer should help you with a warrantee claim.

    Good luck, Pkr2

  3. Well, to what pkr2 said, I can only add that a twisted neck will sink a value very very quickly. I think the reason is that the problem, while not noticeable in a lot of cases, takes major work to correct. And if there was ever a characteristic that buyers avoid, it would have to be a bowed or twisted neck.
  4. A twisted neck especially on a contemporary bass made of exotic woods is a real problem that will only get worse and rob you of significant resale/trade value in the future. The neck was at the time of manufacture certainly accurately formed and since that time the neck has started to twist. Do yourself a favor and contact the dealer you purchased this bass from, the distributor and the manufacturer and IMO settle for nothing other than getting a replacement. It is unusual for a neck to twist these days but it does happen.
  5. pkr2


    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    I know exactly what you mean by difficult to repair, Hambone. A luthier friend of mine restored an old Harmony flat top guitar with a twisted neck. He went so far as to remove the neck(set neck) and fingerboard and planed off about 1/16" to get the twist out. He then shimmed the surface back up to its original level. He spent close to a year, off and on, on what was about a $40.00 guitar. The irony is that after he did all that work the neck still twisted again after a couple of years.

    I offered to buy the guitar from him but he said he was going to keep it to remind him to never make that mistake again. :)