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Two Black Men Exonerated 94 Years After Electrocution

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Dr. Cheese, Oct 14, 2009.


  1. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
  2. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    Bump for some interesting and tragic history. I understand that this is the first posthumous pardon in SC history.
     
  3. I thought it was rather interesting. I enjoy seeing people exonerated for crimes they did not commit, regardless of race. It is only tragic that it took 94 years.

    lowsound
     
  4. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    http://www.thestate.com/154/story/983363.html?storylink=omni_popular

    This is an article from The State newspaper in Columbia, SC. It was interesting to note that at the time of the victim's arrest, and trial, there was a petition in Chester, County, SC that was signed by many leading white citizens to pardon the Griffin brothers. The fact that there was interracial cooperation to save these men at the dawn of Jim Crow is a testament to the shaky nature of the case against them as welll as their character.
     
  5. kesslari

    kesslari Groovin' with the Big Dogs Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2007
    Santa Cruz Mtns, California
    Lark in the Morning Instructional Videos; Audix Microphones
    Wow. Thanks for sharing that.
     
  6. This is why I support any new research in the area of gathering evidence or anything in that field. I believe there are quite a number of innocent ppl in prison (even on death row) that have been framed or due to bad representation or other factors that could be rectified with the right research and scientific evidence finding.
     
  7. IconBasser

    IconBasser Scuba Viking Supporting Member

    Feb 28, 2007
    Fontana, California
    good for them.


    a perfect example of my one qualm of the death penalty. Sometimes, the innocent get the chair by mistake :(
     
  8. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    In this case, it probably was not a mistake. The men were killed because they were successful, and to cover up a sex scandal involving a Civil War veteran. Frame ups like this were very common at the time, and are probably more common than we would like to think as we speak.
     
  9. PSPookie

    PSPookie

    Aug 13, 2006
    Lubbock, TX
    The story is certainly tragic and I hope this brings a modicum of peace to the family, but the whole thing reminds me of the Vatican's apology to Galileo.
     
  10. you should live here....every second guy they convict turns out to be the wrong guy.....
     
  11. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    This subject is interesting because it is a good example of how the past sticks to us whether we want it to or not. These men who died almost 100 years ago left an impact that is still felt today. Their families lost 130 acres of land, and were forced to leave the state. Tom Joyner, the nephew who requested the pardon, did not even know he had these two uncles until two years ago.

    The family faced hardship and economic loss as a direct result of an injustice. In the case of Tom Joyner and his immediate family, they are quite wealthy, but many people who see themselves as honest, have benefitted from past dishonesty when they inherited ill gotten land and other property just as many who are poor were born into bad situations that were not of their own making.

    I want to leave it at that because reparations is essentially a political argument. I just think that it is important to realize that even if we nowadays most do not have negative racial attitudes, it does not mean that the predjudice of the past still is not causing damage today.
     
  12. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    I suppose one has to balance the issue of economic loss flowing from injustice against the protections afforded to a "bona fide purchaser without notice". In the absence of such protection, who would ever risk buying property?
     
  13. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    I don't know Mark, that is outside of my area of expertise.
     
  14. history is full of injustice and i wonder just how far back these reparations will go,and to whom......my forebears were driven from their ancestral lands to toil in english mills,prisons,workhouses,or worse,but i'm not expecting a check any time soon.......more pc folly dependent entirely on how much liberal guilt is available.....
     
  15. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    Go tell that to the relatives of Holocaust victims who ask for restitution since they actually have gotten some money. Tell Armenians mad at the Turks that they are all a bunch of whiners. It pretty much cost SC nothing to say an injustice was done to the Joyner/Griffin family.

    As for your ancestors, they were given a pretty nice compensation: they got to run Native Americans off their ancestral lands or at least occupy them after someone else ran them off. Winnipeg is cold as crap, but other than that, I hear it is a really nice town.:)

    This is all I will say about the topic since I really feel the focus should be on the two men whose names were cleared.
     
  16. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    except, what about the folks -they- ran off? surely you don't think that all aborignal peoples of north america got along as one big happy family, do you? do you think that, because they were of similar ethnic backgrounds, these pre-european settler cycles do not count? the fact that the europeans had better weapons and more numbers does not change the fact that land changed hands in pre-european america as often as the folks who didn't have it could attempt to grab for it.

    same thing happened, and happens still, all over the world, throughout history.

    it's wrong to punish the folks that brought an end to this cycle just because their ancestors were the last ones to engage in it, imo.
     
  17. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    about the original post - that's an interesting development. i hope that kind of thing (the exoneration of african american folks wrongly convicted and executed in the past) continues, tbh. folks need to remember what was rampant, especially in the south, so relatively recently - within a human lifetime, really, to retain perspective on where we are, and where we're going.
     
  18. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis

    I, by no means, suggested that what happened to Native Americans was fair.
     
  19. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    I am always happy to see names cleared and injustices acknowledged. I would be even more happy to see adequate money put into public defense attorney programs and DNA resources. I would also love to see prosecution depoliticized as much as possible. As long as ambitious politicians can build their reputations as prosecutors, the system will be ripe for abuse.
     
  20. Thor

    Thor Gold Supporting Member In Memoriam

    If you are not aware of or have never heard of this case,
    google this term:

    Scottsboro Boys
     

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