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Unique slap issue with my G&L Tribute L-2500

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by DeaconBlues09, Feb 8, 2016.


  1. So first of all, I apologize if this is posted in the wrong thread ("Basses" as opposed to "Technique") but I think this is more of a bass issue than an overall technique issue as explained below…


    I have this slap issue that is, (for me) unique to my G&L Tribute L-2500 pickups. (note that I realize this other models may have this type of pickup, yet, as I have no idea which of the G&L models, or other basses for that matter, have the same pickup build, I am using the term "unique" loosely).


    I noticed that the pickups kind of "sink" into the body when pressed on. That is they aren’t fixed rigidly, and instead are held up with springs of some sort, so that when you press down on them they retreat toward the body.


    As a side note: I haven’t the faintest clue as to why they are designed this way, and if anyone here could enlighten me, I am very interested in what that could be…


    Now, on to my problem. Whenever I attempt to slap, I would get this massive cracking sound as the heel of my thumb came flush with the bridge/strings.

    At first I attributed this issue to the fact that it was my first (non-fretless) 5 string bass. So I responsibly and prudently read through many other TB forums on thransitionong to 5 string, and the various technical adjustments one had to make under various circumstances.


    I dutifully followed all the advice and adjusted my direction of attack, hand positioning, etc, and nothing helped. I finally realized that it was the pickup diving onto the body cavity (and its subsequent release), that was causing this cracking sound.


    It is extremely annoying and I need some advice as to how to rectify this issue. Is there any way to fix/arrest the pickup so it stays in place? Has anyone else encountered this issue and found some way to surpass it?


    Thanks!
     
  2. Torrente Cro

    Torrente Cro

    Sep 5, 2013
    Croatia
    I lowered pickups in my L2500 Tribute all the way down because pickups were on my way even for fingerstyle.
     
    DeaconBlues09 likes this.
  3. Did the lowering significantly affect your tone?
     
  4. Gilmourisgod

    Gilmourisgod

    Jun 23, 2014
    Cape Cod MA
    Get a thin piece of foam packing material or similar compressible material and put it under the pup. It should be thick enough that it gets compressed a little when you screw the pups down to the height you like. Should keep it from bouncing around. A lot of people do this instead of springs, lasts a few years until it gets brittle or crumbly, then replace.
     
  5. arctur

    arctur

    Nov 13, 2015
    Cologne, Germany
    Luthiery supply shops and music stores sell foam rubber for that purpose. You could of course also get it somewhere else but they have it in sizes that are handy for this purpose. Just stick the stuff under the pickup and it won't budge anymore. Many basses come from the factory that way, like my Warwick $$. It's an easy fix and there really is no reason not to do it (except if you want your pickups really low at some point, you'd then have to pull the foam out or make it thinner. But that's also done in a minute).

    That being said:Ii am really really bad at slapping but I wonder what part of the movement of your hand makes the pickups go into the body? Is it your palm? Or is it the strings hitting the top of the pickup? In that case, I'd significantly lower them.
     
  6. Sorry if this is a dumb question, but where exactly do you place the foam? Underneath the pickup? Wouldn't that mess up the wiring?

    As for my slapping technique...I never had the problem before on any of my 4-strings.. I basically anchor the heel of my palm waaaay back on the bridge so as not to have any part of my body interfere with the string's resonance.

    As I mentioned before, I tried many different positions, but (unless I am missing out on something really fundamental), you gotta anchor your slapping hand somewhere on the bass, and there is only so far back you can go before your thumb's point of contact can no longer reach the string....
     
  7. Gilmourisgod

    Gilmourisgod

    Jun 23, 2014
    Cape Cod MA
    Just get a piece of foam a little bigger than you need and cut to slightly smaller than the pup, put under pup, won't interfere with wiring at all. Some people glue them in, but its not necessary. The screws hold the pup tight against the foam, rattle no more. Like Arctur said, you can buy pre-cut pieces from Stewmac or others, but its just foam rubber. I've used foam packing and even pieces of foam pipe insulation you can get at any big box store. Look around your house first, you probably have something you can use. The precut foam stuff is probably made of something that won't deteriorate over time, some foam rubber breaks down in contact with old school nitro finish, but G&L is all poly.
     
    gebass6, arctur and DeaconBlues09 like this.
  8. arctur

    arctur

    Nov 13, 2015
    Cologne, Germany
    Yeah, as Gilmourisgod said.
    The wires usually come out of the side of the pickup so there is no issue. Once you take a look under your pickups you'll see what you need to do.
    I like the precut stuff because it works well and I know that it looks "clean" inside the bass. But i guess it's not essential.
     
    DeaconBlues09 likes this.
  9. lug

    lug

    Feb 11, 2005
    League City, Tx
    Did the same on my L2000....made it easier to control the massive output of the pups. :D
     
  10. Glazenn

    Glazenn

    May 16, 2011
    France
    Have you considered that G&L L2500 have a 17mm string spacing at the bridge instead of usually 19mm on most other makers' basses? It's also less than on a G&L L2000 and other G&L 4 strings.
    G&L fivers have a 1-3/4" nut width (4,45cm), that in addition is unusually narrow for a fiver.
    Hence, you might need your slapping technique to be adjusted a little (I am not a slapper, fingerstyle only). My advice is probably useless, as when reading your post, I'm sure you've done it, but just in case....
     
  11. SpazzTheBassist

    SpazzTheBassist

    Jun 20, 2006
    If you are slapping toward the bridge, this would be the first problem...........
     
  12. Torrente Cro

    Torrente Cro

    Sep 5, 2013
    Croatia
    No, like lug said, output is very high and anyway I think that pickups were higher on L2500 than on my other basses.
     
    DeaconBlues09 likes this.
  13. No, I'm not at all slapping toward the bridge. I am anchoring the side of my hand behind the bridge.

     
  14. Ewo

    Ewo a/k/a Steve Cooper Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2008
    Huntington WV
    It sounds like your pickups might be too high. If you get a 6" machinist's ruler (cheap), it's handy for measuring. If you're not familiar with setting up a bass, Carl Pedigo's YouTube clips will be helpful.

    I'd suggest emailing G & L's tech support, and ask them to send you their standard setup dimensions. Should include neck relief, string height, and pickup height. It'll be a good starting point for your setup.
     
    DeaconBlues09 likes this.
  15. Ewo

    Ewo a/k/a Steve Cooper Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2008
    Huntington WV
    Well, then you're slapping in an unusual place, if the pinky side of your hand is behind the bridge. Pull up a Marcus Miller clip, and you'll see that the conventional slap technique involves the thumb striking the strings at the end of the fingerboard, and the index and middle fingers pulling up (for pops) just behind the end of the fingerboard. The opposite side of the hand rests on the neck pickup cover or the strings themselves. A light touch is best, IMO. You can sound aggressive without hitting the bass too hard...
     
    DiabolusInMusic likes this.
  16. I don't understand, if you rest your hand on the strings themselves, wouldn't you be muting them???
     
  17. SpazzTheBassist

    SpazzTheBassist

    Jun 20, 2006
    OK, considering that the optimum slap position is thumb-strike approximately where the neck meets the body, my mind's eye is picturing that you have a very large hand?
     
  18. It's in your pickups. If they're bouncing around, just unscrew them (DO NOT PULL HARD ON THE PICKUPS because pulling out the wires would be a pain, but you'll still have a few inches of extra wire so it's okay), change whatever the supporting material under them is, and change height accordingly until the problem is resolved to your liking.

    Well yeah. Sometimes it's useful to mute your strings. You'll figure out a technique that works for you though as you play more and more
     
    DeaconBlues09 likes this.
  19. InhumanResource

    InhumanResource

    Dec 28, 2012
    That's kind of wild. It sounds like you are mashing the strings a little too close to the pickup and they are making contact, giving you the big click sound you described. Dropping the pickup will help. When I adjusted the neck angle on my jazz bass to get lower string action, I dropped the neck pickup as low as it goes (no foam or anything) to avoid the same problem you are having.

    You could also try adjusting your technique so that you are not hitting the strings directly over the pickup. Typically the target is for your thumb to make contact up by the end of the fretboard.
     
    BrBss, Tbone76, Glazenn and 1 other person like this.
  20. I have a HUGE hand :thumbsup:
     
    DiabolusInMusic likes this.

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