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"Upright" J bass

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Rumblin' Man, Aug 16, 2007.


  1. Rumblin' Man

    Rumblin' Man Banned

    Apr 27, 2000
    Route 66
    Through a strange series of events I had a NS Design CR4m electric upright in the house on loan from my son's upright teacher last week so he can practice while his upright is in the shop having the fingerboard replaced.

    I'm not an upright player by any means but I spent a couple of hours playing the CR4 and it's a very nice instrument but I don't have that kind of $$$ laying around.

    But that's why I had the NS CR4m tripod stand in the house.

    My inner Mad Scientist took over and I converted one of my heavier Warmoth DIY J basses to fit on the CR4 stand. All it took was two concentric holes drilled in the back of the body and a threaded insert I bought for 69 cents at the local hardware store. I already had the bits and allen wrench required.

    The bass now screws on the CR4 stand very nicely and can go from "upright" to "horizontal" orientation and can be locked anywhere in between.

    I used it for all of last night's job both standing and sitting on a stool with it in the "upright" position and it was much easier on my back, arms and hands not having to support anything all night. We geezers can never be too careful.

    And I swear it sounds better which was kind of unexpected, though I suppose the lack of dampening and the change to vertical oreintation could effect the way it reacts to the string vibrations.

    It was also a lot of fun to play that way. It saved my back and arms their usual wear and tear and was in general much more comfortable to play. I was looking at the instrument differently and that made me think of it differently which made me play differently. Fortunatley it was different in a good way.

    I know the concept isn't new and there are some 34 inch scale fretted instruments that are made specifically to be played in an upright fashion (again, too much $$$ for me) but I've found a new way for me to play.

    Anybody else try something like this?
     
  2. lomo

    lomo passionate hack Supporting Member

    Apr 15, 2006
    Montreal
    I've got a stand I bought at MF a few years back that's made for bass and holds a Jazz in pretty much any orientation you like, but I prefer my Bass Brace belt. They used to advertise in BP mag but eventually went bust. It's basically a weight lifter's belt with a strap (where the belt buckle would be) that holds the bass via a recessed Dunlop straphole on the lower body edge. It entails drilling this straplock receiver hole, which is basically invisible. I still wear a strap, but 90% of the weight is on my hips and the regular strap is only to keep the bass in position. I used to have pain after 30 minutes and searched for the lightest basses-now I can play as long as my legs can stand with absolutely no strain. 12 lb axe? Bring it on :) This is definitely the way to go IMO.
     
  3. EduardoK

    EduardoK

    Jun 28, 2004
    You should try a Barker Bass :D
     
  4. Rumblin' Man

    Rumblin' Man Banned

    Apr 27, 2000
    Route 66
    I looked into them, way too expensive for me.
     
  5. Eric S

    Eric S

    Jul 19, 2005
    Paris, France
    NS designs makes that 34" bass cello that uses the same stand.

    http://www.nedsteinberger.com/instruments/instruments.html

    I play my fretless ABG practically vertical.
    Aside from playing further from the bridge, upright players use the entire side of their right hand index finger to pluck the string. The more meat you get on there, the bigger rounder sound you get.

    That might be part of the reason for Rumblin' Man's impression of getting a better sound...a little more finger on the string and further up the neck.
     

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