Using a guitar amp with bass : which frequencies should I cut?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Inconnu, Apr 29, 2012.


  1. Hi!

    I was thinking of adding a small guitar amp to my rig which I'd use to get some grrrr out of my highs and high-mids. My plan is to use one of the 2 outputs of a stereo pedal I have and send my signal into the small 1x12 combo, which would play simultaniously with my SVT.

    The question : in order to make sure I don't blow up my guitar amp's speaker, I'd like to know which frequencies should I cut from the signal I'd sent to the guitar amp (which I plan on doing with an EQ pedal) and should I also ad a compressor to my chain, in order to save the guitar amp's speaker?
     
  2. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Yamaha, Ampeg, Line 6, EMG
    Lows below 100hz are what you should turn down, and compression is optional.
     
  3. My Fender Hot Rod Deluxe sounds great with the bass rolled off. Nice to plug into every now and then. I've even used it with my bass rig like that.
     
  4. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Yamaha, Ampeg, Line 6, EMG
    Hope you put strings and a pickup on it first ;)
     
  5. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    This^^

    If you have an EQ pedal to use, pull down everything below 200-400 hz, then experiment with the other frequencies to dial it in.

    If just running the combo, turn the bass knob all the way down.
     
  6. Oh, so just turning the knob down would do... Why didn't I think of that???:confused:
     
  7. sloppy_phil

    sloppy_phil

    Aug 21, 2011
    Toronto, ON, Canada
    Not actually named Phil
    Yeah, just cut the bass frequencies out, especially if you are using it in tandem with a proper bass amp, you won't miss the lack of lows, and probably greatly enjoy that cutting awesomeness!

    If it's your only amp, well, you aren't going to have a terribly bassy sound. Unless you're using the amp really quietly, in which case you can set it more or less how you like

    Oh, and don't plug an active bass into it if it's the only amp you plan to use... that's an explosion waiting to happen!
     
  8. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    if you're running some overdrive in the amp you won't need compression, that's a natural byproduct of overdrive.
     
  9. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    In a "poor man's bi-amp" like this, that Fender is a good thing to use because turning it's bass knob all the way down should equate to "no bass", which is what you want. Let your bass rig make the bass, let the combo add gritty mids/highs. May sound a little wierd up close, but step back a ways and it'll come together and sound nice.

    On Fenders, you have to have the bass knob on a little bit to have any bass in the sound at all, so use that tone stack to your advantage in this application and turn the bass off, crank the mids, add highs to taste.
     
  10. Stumbo

    Stumbo Guest

    Feb 11, 2008
    You might want to check out this foot pedal 10 Band EQ for bass by Whirlwind to get the "cut" you need without running the combo.

    It has 15db freq. cut/boost utilizing: 20 40 80 160 320 600 900 1.3k 1.8k 3k.

    It can also be used as a high pass to cut low bass noise below 60hz that may also clean up your tone quite a bit as well.

    or a more generalize digital EQ with 9 programmable memories from Boss.

    It has 15db cut/boost utilizing: 30 60 90 120 200 400 800 1.6K 3.2k 6.4k
     
  11. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    Nice.....every single center is in a very useable spot.
     
  12. You can't hurt the speaker. Tweak until it sounds good.
     
  13. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    by playing bass through an open-back guitar combo? you certainly can!

    the "hurt" happens in the low end, which is why the advice to kill the lows on the guitar amp EQ.
     
  14. Hell, it could be sealed and still flap to death with bass.
     
  15. No, you can't. The amp can't magically start overpowering the speaker just because of what's plugged into it. Guitarists use octave pedals without problems all the time.
     
  16. jungleheat

    jungleheat Inactive

    Jun 19, 2011
    DC
    Some of the advice here is probably overdoing it a bit. Cutting everything below 200 Hz on a bass? You won't have anything left!

    If you are going for a "dirty" sound, you need enough "meat" to get there. Cut too high and it will sound tinny and awful. A standard guitar goes down to about 80 Hz. So I fail to see why you would need to cut any higher than that, and you might be able to get away with just cutting below 60.

    What kind of guitar amp is it? That will make somewhat of a difference in where you start cutting.
     
  17. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    Excursion ceases to be a factor above roughly 200hz, which is still in the meaty lowmids of the bass. It takes away the risk of speaker damage and still makes the combo work plenty hard/get gritty. He has a bass rig to provide all the bass he wants, just adding the combo to it for gritty mids/top. There is no 1 hard and fadt frequency to do it...dial it in, but keep low frequency speaker excursion in mind for the openback combo.

    I believe he said it was a Hotrod Deluxe.
     
  18. and a guitar on octave pedal sounds just like a bass, yeah right. If you thump an E on a bass it sends the speaker flying.
     
  19. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    +1

    He's only focusing on frequency and not the force/power content behind that frequency. If it was the same, we'd all play short neck, skinny strings basses and octave pedals.:D

    Dmusic148....they're different instruments for a reason...don't treat them as if they were the same. Frequency, power demands, harmonic structure are all different....otherwise they'd be the same.
     
  20. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    There's a reason your E on the 12th fret on the E string and your E on the 2nd fret on the D string don't sound the same. It's the same reason a low E on a guitar modulated an octave down doesn't sound like any E there is on a bass.
     
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