van loading/cabinet question...

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by thetaurus, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. thetaurus


    May 28, 2002
    Muncy, PA
    we have a way to load our van up right now. everything fits. but we're going to be adding another crate for merch and need to rearrange. right now my svt 8x10 is on it's side. our drummer (who used the van for his old band) says he knows a way to do it with my cabinet on it's back, because that's how they did it in his old band.

    my question is this: is there any difference between putting my cabinet on it's side or on it's back?
  2. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    If the cabinet is on its back, that means the face with the speakers is pointing up, right? If stuff is going to be piled up on top of the face, there is every possibilty that stuff can shift and poke holes in speakers.

    If that's the sound you're going for, fine.

    Or you carry a piece of plywood that is useless for anything other than covering the face of your speaker cabinet.

    If you put the cabinet face down, you run the risk of stuff sliding all over the jacks in the speaker (or is the SVT cab angled? it's been so long since I've played through anything I couldn't pack in the trunk of a Toyota), but that's minimal compared to having the corner of the PA cabinet push through a speaker cone.
  3. bmc


    Nov 15, 2003
    Can't add more. Well said. My only changes would be to change his type of car from Toyota to BMW. Other than that......
  4. pbd

    pbd Commercial User

    Jul 17, 2003
    Metro Detroit
    owner Procables N Sound
  5. jdombrow

    jdombrow Supporting Member

    Jan 16, 2002
    Colorado Springs, CO
    I'm sure there will differing opinions on this, but I;ve heard that placing cabinets face up or face down in not a good idea. Any large bumps can cause the voice coils to travel beyond their expected limits and potentially cause damage. I would think that in a heavily loaded van, there could be some severe bumps, as the shock absorbers will likely be overloaded.
  6. seanm

    seanm I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize! Supporting Member

    Feb 19, 2004
    Ottawa, Canada
  7. Gabu


    Jan 2, 2001
    Woodland Hills, CA
    I can't imagine that the bumps you get in driving could abuse your speakers that badly without putting the passengers in the hospital too. :confused:
  8. j-raj

    j-raj Bassist: Educator/Soloist/Performer Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jan 14, 2003
    Atlanta, GA!
    how about on it's side with the speakers facing on of the Van Walls?
  9. Rickenbackerman


    Apr 17, 2001
    Laurel MD
    I think face-down is the way to go *because* you use the speakers natural cone movement as it's own suspension. If the speakers are sideways, the cones have no suspension and you risk smacking the crap out of the voice coils if the bumps are big enough. And I agree with Gabu - you'd probably need many G's to bottom out a cone, such as driving off a cliff.
  10. the best way to figure stuff like this out is just take the time gather all the crap together and put it in until it fits then remember how it is so you can do it again. i think face down should be fine nd on the side should be fine whatever way makes the stuff fit without poking the speakers is probly the best.
  11. Petebass


    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't it take up the same amount of room on it's back as it would on it's front with the speakers pointing dornwards. That's how I'd prefer it, maybe with a piece of foam or an old rug underneath ..............
  12. jim primate

    jim primate bass guitarist.

    just a suggestion when you do get it all in there, make a diagram so you can do it again real easy. fugazi did this, it was a map to loading and a checklist so you don't forget anything.
  13. pbd

    pbd Commercial User

    Jul 17, 2003
    Metro Detroit
    owner Procables N Sound
    I used to travel my EV1502's on their wheels until I separated the compression drivers magnet. I was told to travel them on their face so as to avoid that again. They had gotten a lot of travel and use but I was glad for the suggestion to avoid another $200.

    Have your littlest guy sit on the crate of new merchandise :D
  14. McHack


    Jul 29, 2003
    Central Ohio!
    Huh... That's good to know, pbd... I don't have anything really useful to add. All I know is,,if the cones are facing up & you're setting stuff ON the cones... that just sounds like an equipment malfunction waiting to happen.
  15. pbd

    pbd Commercial User

    Jul 17, 2003
    Metro Detroit
    owner Procables N Sound
    When on tour a map and load order were crucial. Loading mulitiple semi's was like putting puzzle pieces together. Even though this is a small van in comparision the thoughts the same. Get used to bringing everything out in the order it goes into the van and you won't have any traffic jams at the door!
  16. Petebass


    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    This thread reminds me of one of Duncan Fry's articles. He's a well know Aussie Sound engineer and a darn good story teller. Here's an extract:-

    "When I was just starting out in the industry, Colin and I worked with a Jazz Funk band for a while. Unfortunately for them, it was at the height of the extended mix disco compilation craze, and despite the band's undoubted talent, audiences responded to them by sitting down and drinking when they played, and getting up to dance when they stopped. (About the best thing you could say about the "Hooked On..." crap by Jive Bunny etc etc was that it taught a whole generation of Australians to clap off the beat!)

    Still, luckily for the band (and us) their management had a lot of clout, so there were always 2 or 3 gigs a week.

    The bass player either had enormous faith in the two of us, or a misplaced faith in divine intervention, because he didn't have a road case or any kind of cover for his speaker box. And although we took the best care of it that we could, one day the inevitable happened - it fell over in the truck and something sharp ripped through the grille cloth. Incredibly the speaker wasn't damaged, but there was a nasty hole in the cloth; and although he was philosophical about it, you could tell he wasn't pleased. We put a cross of gaffer tape over the hole to stop it spreading.

    Musicians definitely have no sense of humour when it comes to themselves or their equipment. The next gig, just for a bit of fun, we put great huge crosses of black gaffer all over the front of his bass bin. He rolled up to the gig, stepped on stage, took a horrified look at the gaffer tape, rushed over to the box, and peeled up the tape to have a look at what he anticipated would be enormous holes! Of course, there weren't any, and he stood on stage fuming as Col and I rolled around laughing our heads off.

    From then onwards he carried all his gear himself in his own car!"
  17. McHack


    Jul 29, 2003
    Central Ohio!
    ROFLMAO!!!! That's great.
  18. One word of caution: if you travel with it face down (which IS the best way, btw) just make sure you don't let the cab fall on its face. The pressure from the resultant air pressure-trap against the cones is a potential speaker killer. Place it on its face gently. Just because the box is made of strong plywood, the speakers aren't.

    Tip of the day from your friendly speaker cabinet builder, Ron
  19. Arranger


    Mar 9, 2003
    Very valuable advice here. Thanks. I'll give more thought to my cab handling now!
  20. thetaurus


    May 28, 2002
    Muncy, PA
    so i guess i should be putting in in face down then? i'm not sure what i'm going to do...i've always put it on it's side, and everything fits perfectly right now. just the 2 merch crates don't. but...we have a high top on our van, and a large space by the loft that we have been using for merch lately. i think i'm just gonna stay with how things are.