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Warwick amp and cab question

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Skavenger, Jul 28, 2003.


  1. Skavenger

    Skavenger

    May 26, 2002
    Sweden
    I'm thinking of buying a Profet IV(400W) From Warwick. Now, to top that off I want a cab from Warwick as well. I don't know a great deal about amps, this is my first "real" one, so which cab do I choose? The choice stands between a W-410 and a W-411. What does RMS stand for, and does it tell me how much watts the cab can handle? Correct me if I'm wrong.
    Now, to the question: What is best to use to the amplifier in question, a 300W RMS W-410 or a 600W RMS W-411 cab? Does more watts on the cab mean a weaker sound, ie if I have a 200W amp and a 1000W RMS cab, do I get no sound? If I choose too much RMS, can I add more power to the amplifier later? Thanks.
     
  2. Skavenger

    Skavenger

    May 26, 2002
    Sweden
    Come on, don't you wanna help a beginner out?
     
  3. Obsolex

    Obsolex Guest

    Nov 17, 2002
    It's better to overpower the head than the cab. If you had a 1000 watt RMS head at 4 ohms, and a cab that was 400 watts at 4 ohms, you could only use 400 watts out of the head. And you would have 600 watts headroom (before it starts becoming distorted). But don't use the amp at more than 400 or what ever wattage of the cab...
    If you underpower the cab with a weaker head, then the speakers could blow just as easily, because when you get a distorted sound at such a low (for the cab) volume, it harms the speakers.
    Hope I explained it good, lata-
     
  4. iplaybass

    iplaybass Guest

    Feb 13, 2000
    Germantown, TN
    RMS means continuous power input, as opposed to peak wattage which is the maximum 'spike' a cab can handle. Now, if I remember my bass specs correctly, the 410 does not have a tweeter while the 411 does. I'd recommend the 411, I think you'll want that tweeter even if you just turn the pad all the way down. Good to have the option. More wattage just means the cab can handle more power. More power=more sound, assuming the sensitivities are the same, and in this case I think they are.


    Now somebody help me out... What does RMS really stand for? Root mean squared or something like that? I forgot... :confused:
     
  5. iplaybass

    iplaybass Guest

    Feb 13, 2000
    Germantown, TN
    Nope... common myth. You can't underpower speakers. The only way you could blow the speaker is if you push the amp too hard and send a clipping signal to the cab. You could put 1 (one) watt into an 8x10 and play as much as you wanted without a problem.
     
  6. Skavenger

    Skavenger

    May 26, 2002
    Sweden
    Thank you for the answers! It sure cleared a few things up, but what is this Ohm you're talking about? What does it control? And "headroom", what is that? These questions may seem trivial to you amp-knowhows but as I said, I have not that much experience.
     
  7. squire_pwr

    squire_pwr

    Apr 15, 2003
    San Diego, CA.
    Yeah, that sounds right...root mean squared. Fancy way to say average...physists always want to seem smarter. :p j/k I think many are a lot smarter than anyone gives them credit for.

    Skavenger: I'll do my best, but I'm no amp-knowhow...

    -Ohms don't control anything in terms of your bass's tone. I'm not exactly sure about the theory involved (and so this explaination will probably stink), but ohms has to do with the amount of resistance a cab gives to the amp. The lower the ohms, the less resistance and the more power you can put through the cab. BUT, go too low, and you fry your amp (read the specs for the amp and it'll tell you the minimum load). Here is how you calculate the total load (resistance) of any given number of cabinets:

    1/(load A) + 1/(load B) + etc = 1/(total load)

    This means two 8 ohm cabs gives 4 ohms total resistance (1/8 + 1/8 = 1/4). Two 4 ohm cabs gives a 2 ohm load, etc.

    Headroom, to my understanding, is sort of like, "How much louder can I go?" So, with more headroom, the less you push your amp and then your amp is further away from farting out, which is normally bad. :) Hope this helps.
     
  8. Skavenger

    Skavenger

    May 26, 2002
    Sweden
    Thanks a heap for the answers! I'm off to order the prrrecioussss :)