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warwick corvette std. 5

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by rich37, Aug 1, 2002.


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  1. A few days ago I bought a warwick corvette std. 5-string.

    The B-string is tight, that's a good thing.
    But the rest of the strings(E,A,D,G) are tight also, but they are too tight to decently make bend down's or vibratos with.
    The bass I had before this one was a Fender jazz(4-string) with the same string setup(exept for the G)
    But the Fender also had a floppy B-string and was well suited to make bend downs & vibratos with.

    The Warwick came with warwick black label(45-135)
    And I changed the A-D-G with rotosounds swingbass, 40-100's (3 strings) in order to loosen up the strings..

    It helped a bit but not enough, what should I do?
     
  2. Pharmecopia

    Pharmecopia

    Jul 31, 2002
    i use a warwick thumb 5, and i know what you mean. first of all, rotosound are decent strings, but the key word there is decent. i have tried many, but i think DR strings are best for a warwick. try DR hi beams. also, make sure you get a tapered B string.
     
  3. Deano Destructo

    Deano Destructo Music Man/Upton addict. Hasn't slept since 1979. Supporting Member

    Dec 10, 2000
    Austin, TX
    I second the use of DR hi-beams for use on a Warwick since I too play a Thumb but I would think that an adjustment in the bridge, namely the string saddles would be more fruitful. Simply put, loosen the sandles on the strings you wish to:confused: ......well loosen:D .
     
  4. Worst advice possible in this situation. There is nothing you can do about string tension on a particular bass except find a set of strings that have less tension when tuned to pitch - just like the pharmacist said.

    "Loosening" your saddles could do a lot of other things though like ruin your intonation, or make your strings to low to play without fretbuzz.

    I would caution newbies in this forum to read for awhile and learn who has proper information and who doesn't. Just because it gets published here on the net doesn't mean it's gospel. If you are uncertain about a procedure, ask for more help. We have some very talented and informed individuals that are contributors here - just look at our "Luthiers" forum - and the right answer usually isn't too far away.
     
  5. Deano Destructo

    Deano Destructo Music Man/Upton addict. Hasn't slept since 1979. Supporting Member

    Dec 10, 2000
    Austin, TX
    :mad: That was alittle uncalled for don't you think? I was simply stating to loosen them out from the back of the bridge not down towards the fretboard:rolleyes: . Juat because something works for me does not mean it works for you, thats what really should be taken under advisement. I'm not doubting your experience by any means or stating that I'm right and your wrong, but mabye this "newbie":rolleyes: should take his bass to a CERTIFIED tech. instead of taking the chance that someone without the "proper" info might mislead them[​IMG].
    To you rich, I apologize for possibly misleading you, but as I said it worked in my case and I too own a Warwick but as always "its just a matter of opinion".:D
     
  6. Pharmecopia

    Pharmecopia

    Jul 31, 2002

    rock on :cool:
     
  7. Well FiXeR, I've let your comment stand all day so that I can sit back and think about what you've said...

    Nope, it's still one of the most irresponsible pieces of advice I've ever heard. Let's count the ways shall we?

    You seem to be fond of anecdotal evidence to support your claim that "loosening" the saddles to allow for less tension in a tuned string. You even go so far as to say that you've been able to do this on your own instrument. Please tell us the procedure you used and how it affected the tension. By knowing this, the search for the holy grail of a tight B string can be ended immediately. After all, if it can be done by adjustment as you say, we will never have to ask the question "How's the B string?" since all the tight ones can be loosened and the floppy ones tightened - correct?

    In most basses I know of, the string comes in contact with the bass's hardware in 4 locations. First is whatever method the ball ends are held in place. It's different on many basses but the result is the same - a firm anchor for the end of the string to have tension pulled against. Any chance of this being able to be adjusted to alter tension? No way at all is my answer.

    The second is the saddle on whatever bridge system is used. This component has quite a few duties in a proper playing instrument. First and foremost is the termination of the scale length and with it, the strings vibration. Most all basses allow for adjustment here to tune the individual string length to the fretboard - called "intonation". Scale length has no bearing on tension since any given string must be tensioned to a precise point to be in tune. This is the variable between string sets/manufacturers/string models, etc. The saddle also locates the string height, and determines lateral position. I believe you have already agreed that changing one of these factors won't change the tension of a tuned string.

    The next component is the nut on the neck. This, like it's counterpart the saddle, terminates string vibration and locates the string laterally on the neck. Generally it's not adjustable but there are some Warwicks and Alembics that have the capability to adjust string height here. But as you've correctly pointed out - nothing to do with string tension.

    The last part of the bass that comes in contact with the string is the tuner. Now this DOES have an effect on string tension - really big effects. You have to put the proper amount of tension on a string to bring it to tune. Aside from ancoring the string end that's all the tuner does. But once the string is in tune, what else is there to alter the string tension? The answer is NOTHING! The tension of a tuned string is mostly determined by the composition of the string and, to a lesser extent, the overall design of the bass and how these two work together. Nothing more.

    My D'Addario XL roundwounds all feel pretty much the the same on my Fender style instruments - 4 in total. These instruments are all very similar in design, from bridge to tuner so that would be expected. The XL's do seem a bit tighter on my Kawai but that might be due to a different design at the bridge area with an extreme break angle over the saddles. Either way, for a given set of strings it's impossible to "adjust" away the tension. If an altogether different set of strings were to be used, I might expect a difference in tension but it wouldn't come from any of the components used to hold the string in place.

    This isn't a case of one person's approach being better than another's. That's left for discussions of the best way to finish a body or the best coating for a fretless board. In cases like these, YMMV and to each his own preference. This is a case of the same physics applying to all instruments. There's no avoiding it. To take your approach would only mean that Rich would have a bass that wouldn't be intonated and, ergo, play like crap.

    As for seeking professional help - that's always a good route to take. There are many here on TB and many more out there in the world that can put my expertise (or lack of it) in stark perspective. I would consider myself a professional in training. I read, I ask questions, I observe, I assimilate at an incredible rate and I am driven to know this stuff inside and out. As of yet, I don't know it all and will keep my opinions to myself when that's the case and I have something more to learn and nothing to offer an inquiry. One only has to look at the volume of questions in this forum that I DON'T respond to the get an idea of my scope of knowledge. I encourage any reader to doubt my advice and seek other counsel. Research it yourself, learn how I'm wrong. Then come back here and blow my views out of the water. I welcome the education and will use the lesson to further my passion for this stuff.
     
  8. Pharmecopia

    Pharmecopia

    Jul 31, 2002
    dang, thats one long post. "(oh no! not another pointless post by this weirdo)" - Hambone.
     
  9. First of all I'm definetly not a newbie, people who play bass for 10 years can still have questions.

    I'm not misled by anyone, thanks for all your help!!

    Maybe Steve Lawson knows the answer?
    Or any pro on this message board?

    Do you think if I changing strings from 40-100 to 35-95 would help?
    How thicker the strings how more tension there is in the strings??
     
  10. Steve Lawson

    Steve Lawson Solo Bass Exploration! Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2000
    Birmingham, UK
    There are a few factors that affect the tension in a string - the most obvious is the guage - lighter strings have to be slacker in order to reach the required pitch. But guage has to be traded against mass - some strings have different shaped cores for the windings to go round, and therefor have more gaps in them, less mass, and as a result a different set of resonance to pitch to tension etc. ratios.

    If the strings are too tight, there are a couple of solutions - first, try lighter strings. Simple as that. taper wound strings will probably vibrate more freely, especially on the B and E (though I've never had any problem with my Elite flats which aren't tapered at all).

    Secondly, but a shorter scale bass... :oops:)

    lowering the action can give the illusion of lower tension, because the strings are rattling off the neck, you therefor have to play lighter, and it all gets a bit easier. But it is an illusion. the only way to change the tension of a given string is to retune it...

    ...which is another option - drop the whole bass down a tone. Works for Doug Pinnick... :oops:)

    cheers

    Steve
    www.steve-lawson.co.uk
     
  11. First I should apologize for the misconception that I believed you were new to the instrument. What I was thinking as I wrote that post was that you were new to TB - just another kind of "newbie". Of course you can have questions. In fact, it's usually after playing the instrument awhile - really getting to know it - that the really interesting questions about it's care and feeding arise. With a forum, you have no way of knowing if a post is giving good info or not until you've spent a bit of time reading. That's where being new to TB can be a problem. I don't want someone to snag the first piece of advice that comes along (perhaps wrong advice) and ruin their experience with the instrument. Luckily in this case, Pharmocopia's advice was quite sound.

    Was this just coincidence that you mention Steve Lawson's name and he just "happens" to post the next response? :confused: Or maybe he's your brother-in-law or something :D At any rate, it's great to see the biggies looking in here occasionally. We don't get much of that in Setup and it's unfortunate. After all, just about everything we look forward to in bassdom filters down from the guys at the top of biz. You just can't beat the experience the pros have. That's why, when I'm in the presence of such talent, I keep my mouth shut, my ears open, and my hands off of my basses! :)
     
  12. Steve Lawson

    Steve Lawson Solo Bass Exploration! Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2000
    Birmingham, UK
    LOL

    there are a few ways I tend to find out about threads like this. I quite often get emails from people asking me to contribute to certain threads.

    The other is that I occasionally do a 'vanity search' for my own name on talkbass, just to see if someone has asked for my input somewhere...

    ...so all you have to do is say my name three times, and I appear as if by magic... :oops:)

    cheers

    Steve
    www.steve-lawson.co.uk
     
  13. abracadabra steve lawson!

    Thanx very much it was indeed a huge surprise!!

    One more question; by lighter strings you refer to strings with lesser guage??
     
  14. Steve Lawson

    Steve Lawson Solo Bass Exploration! Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2000
    Birmingham, UK
  15. I figure, now the dust has settled, the big guy stepped into answer the question... Hambone has given me permission to close this thread. ;)

    :D:D

    Merls
     



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