Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Warwick freltess owners:::

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by JAL, Mar 5, 2005.


  1. JAL

    JAL

    Dec 15, 2004
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Hey guys. How low do you have your nut adjusted? I think mines too low...but im not sure. Gettin weird buzzes when i "Fret" and bad tone for some reason.
     
  2. jpo259

    jpo259

    Feb 2, 2005
    Corona, CA
    Have you checked for neck relief??? String height??? All that PLUS the nut level will affect action, tone, mwahhh, etc on a Warwick fretless.
     
  3. Timbo

    Timbo

    Jun 14, 2004
    My nut is at the lowest 'setting'.
     
  4. JAL

    JAL

    Dec 15, 2004
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Action is very low (4/16th inch on top, 5 on bottom)
    Neck relief is a hair above flat.
     
  5. Groove Theory

    Groove Theory Grizzly Adams DID have a beard.

    Oct 3, 2004
    The Psychiatric Ward
    Diddo, but my fretless 'wick has the older brass nut on 'er.
     
  6. JAL

    JAL

    Dec 15, 2004
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Still havin the problems...esh. so frustrating!
     
  7. JAL

    JAL

    Dec 15, 2004
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Loosened the rod a hair, made it buzz worse lol! Did wat the willis website suggested, lowered the bridge all the way to see where the strings buzz, and they buzz evenly, everywhere. Accordin 2 that site, it means the neck relief is good; string height is off. Do you have a ballpoint figure to raise the bridge to and fiddle?
     
  8. Frank Martin

    Frank Martin Bitten by the luthiery bug...

    Oct 8, 2001
    Budapest, Hungary, EU
    No... and I don't think anyone has. You have to figure this out for yourself.
    Raise the entire bridge with the big Allen wrenches - let's say 1/3 - 1/2 a turn, then check if it still buzzes (you might want to raise the deeper side a bit more than the treble-string side). If it does, then raise a bit more. If just some strings buzz now, then only raise their saddles.

    If you find a point where it just stops buzzing, then raise a bit more. Even though this wont get you the lowest possible action, but this way you won't buzz badly if you play a bit harder. And believe me, it's not always easy to control how hard you play when you're on stage.

    Having them a little higher won't kill you, either. That way you have more room for playing style and dynamics before the string starts buzzing.
    Oh and remember that, like, James Jamerson played with string height many called unplayable. And lots of others, too.
     
  9. JAL

    JAL

    Dec 15, 2004
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Yes; the bass played vey well from the store. However, it came with the stock warwick rounds, so i swapped em for Ti jazzs. Its a bolt on. Ive been doing guitar setup for years (very competent) and im decent at bass setup...been doin that to my zone bass for over 2 years.
    Its getting better; the buzz is starting to lessen. My theory is the neck is taking some time to settle in from the truss rod loosening.
    Im just so frustrated: that fretless sound is so good, but it seems impossible to achive! I have found a guy in cleveland who is renowned at setups, so hes my last resort.
    Thanks for the help; hopes the info helps ya make a diagnoses docs ;-)
     
  10. JAL

    JAL

    Dec 15, 2004
    Cleveland, Ohio
    new.
    Ok- relief is set and the saddles (string height) are adjusted to follow the fingerboard. Next step is the bridge?
    -j
     
  11. JAL

    JAL

    Dec 15, 2004
    Cleveland, Ohio
  12. JAL

    JAL

    Dec 15, 2004
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Yea- they have a guide. However, its for fretted, so im guessing the measurements are different.
     
  13. JAL

    JAL

    Dec 15, 2004
    Cleveland, Ohio
    I. Love. You.
    Not really, but you are a lifesaver.
    I put it up to factory (fretless) and the buzz is gone. Plays OK. Now im gonna lower it bit by bit until i get that fretless tone. If the string is too high, can it buzz on a fretless, or are those just dead spots on the upper "Frets"?
     
  14. JAL

    JAL

    Dec 15, 2004
    Cleveland, Ohio
    These are flats, and we didnt talk about a shim.
     
  15. Don't know whether to start a new thread, this is approximately same problem with almost the same guitar. Somebody let me know if they think I should start a new one. I'm a newbie here, and don't know all the etiquette so well.

    I recently purchased a Warwick Fortress One used. 5 string fretless bolt-on. This thing sounds great, I love it, but string heighth at the top of the fretboard seems darned close to the 1st bass my grandpa bought for me for $25 when I was 17 (uh, that was a long time ago) ;)

    My bridge is bottomed out. The saddles don't make much of a difference. I think the nut is OK.

    Relief seems OK too, when I hold at 1st and 24th 'frets', can't get a credit card under it (it's not even a real credit card, it's more like a club membership card, it's thinner).

    The only other thing I have thought of is to shim it. This is mentioned in Willis' book 101 Bass Tips, so I thought 'what the hey'. I tried it - even used a Victor Wooten concert ticket doubled over as the shim - and that seems to have helped some, but still not a lot.

    Should I try a truss rod adjustment anyway?

    Through a strange coincidence, the details of which I won't bore you with, a friend of mine bought a 5 string fretless Fortress One a couple of weeks before I did. He seems to be having the same problem. We both thought that these things are so adjustable, we could whip them into shape in no time, but that was before we realized the bridge was bottomed out.

    Any advice would be highly appreciated. :cool:

    ken
     
  16. gapupten

    gapupten

    Dec 29, 2004
  17. Great, thanks for the pointer - yes, people here seem very helpful - including you!!

    Have you done any more experimenting with your shim situation? The part about different materials from Mottlefeeder is quite interesting - I was thinking of using maple for mine, since the body is maple.

    Thanks again :)
    ken
     
  18. JAL

    JAL

    Dec 15, 2004
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Yea Ken- i ended up shimming mine a few days ago. Fixed it perectly. Used a thin piece of bubinga to match the bass wood.
     
  19. Cool. Glad to hear it. This morning, I sent the same question to Warwick tech support - he answered within an hour!! He recommend shimming it with sandpaper glued to the neck. I'll post the whole email here when I get back on my work computer. It's good to know Warwick tech support is so responsive, even to somebody who bought a used, out-of-production bass.

    Thanks for all the help. I'm sure I will be shimming sometime in the next few days with maple, bubinga, sandpaper, etc. :D I think I'll leave the Victor Wooten ticket in - makes me think of the cartoon with the frog sealed up in the cornerstone of the building - "hello my baby, hello my honey, hello my ragtime doll""

    ken
     
  20. gapupten

    gapupten

    Dec 29, 2004
    What a great idea.
    One of the problems I had with aluminum is movement of the cut pieces within the pocket before the screws were fully in place. This resulted in a slight tilt to the neck joint, which meant I had to undo the neck joint and redo it.
    By glueing the sandpaper inplace, you are actually increasing the size of the neck heel. This makes the joining more uniform because there are two pieces joining not three. I suppose you could vary the thickness of the shim by usng different grit sandpaper.

    Has anyone else used this approach? :confused: