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Weird song forces cool technique...

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by CrawlingEye, Dec 20, 2001.


  1. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    I'm currently learning this one song, that I've been wanting to take into my bass teacher for a while, but never got around to.

    It's "Trademark" by "Hot Water Music"

    In the one part of the song, the bassist does this relatively difficult thing, where he plays octaves of the A on the open A, and 7th fret D.
    (It's like 0 7 0 7 0 7, for a few measures, in 1/8th notes, with a fairly quick BPM)

    So, I have to use one finger for each string, I have my middle finger (since it's longer) on the d string, and the pointer finger on the A (on my plucking hand)

    It was kind of odd, but has turned out pretty interesting, and kind of opened up a new approach, for me.


    I don't really know the purpose of this thread, it's not a question, just really a statement. :)
     
  2. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    In half the motion, you could pluck the A on the D and then open A with one finger, and that's two notes in one stroke with one finger. Alternate doing that and mute with your left hand...much less work.
     
  3. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    I tried the one finger thing, and just going straight down to the A from the D, but it's too difficult, considering the speed of the song.
     
  4. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    I didn't say one finger, I'm saying hitting both strings with one finger, and alternating fingers like usual.

    I know the song you're talking about, and I can even play it. It's a lot easier this way.
     
  5. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    Hrm, maybe I'll give that a try.

    I'm not talking about the intro, I'm talking about the second measure of the next part (Well, it repeats quite a few times)

    Where he just plays octaves of A...
    I think your technique might work nicely, but prove more of a pain, for me, considering that he doesn't let the notes sustain into each other.
     
  6. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    They will sustain into each other, though, unless you mute them with your left hand. It will help to let them ring out better this way because your middle finger won't accidently hit the A after plucking the D.

    My way is the proper method for playing anything.
     
  7. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    Angus,
    I tried your way, and it just seems too awkward for me. I suppose it doesn't really matter which way you do it, as long as the job gets done.

    Htag,
    normally this would be a good idea, but he's playing quite quickly in this song, and it's literally 1/8th notes that switch from octave to octave, at a fairly quick BPM.
    It'd be nearly impossible to hop strings that quickly, for me, atleast.
     
  8. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    I fail to understand...how is less movement awkward? Did you misunderstand what I said to do? You can do it your way if you'd like, that's fine, I'm just curious about how it can be awkward!
     
  9. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    It IS awkward, Angus. :D I fail to understand how the hell you can get any speed using your method.

    For sequences like this, I would use my ring (!) finger to pluck the lower (= the ones closer to the floor) strings and my index for the upper one. I can do it pretty fast, too (I tried it with my metronome, and could handle 16th notes at 140 bpm without too much trouble). So, regardless of my way being "the proper way" or not, that is how I do it, and I like it. :p

    I WILL have your way in mind, though. Who knows, maybe with a little practice behind me I'll eventually like it more? :cool:
     
  10. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Two people? Very interesting! It always seemed more normal, to me obviously, to get both strings with 1 finger, rake style. Hell of a lot less motion! Much easier to do at higher speeds than the other method, for me at least.
     
  11. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    Easier for you, not for me. Wow, we are different! ;)

    Although I have to say that I've been practicing the rake style the last fifteen minutes, and have already gotten decent hang of it. Now I can clearly see its potential!

    Gotta go to bed, will practice the rakes more tomorrow! :D
     
  12. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    It's not that we're different, it's just that you're wrong. :p

    (kidding:D )
     
  13. Oysterman

    Oysterman

    Mar 30, 2000
    Sweden
    One thing though... could the rake style be utilized for playing "string-skipping" things like this?

    tAbZ!
    Code:
    |-------------5---7---5-----------|
    |-7---5---7---------------5---6---|
    |---0---0---0---0---0---0---0---0-|
    |---------------------------------|
    
    It is in situations like these I find my erroneous method convenient, meaning I can play it FAST and that's ALL that matters! :D
     
  14. i do stuff like that your way, crawlingeye... and for stuff like htag suggested, 5th fret E string 7th fret D string, i use the same technique, only first and ring instead of first and middle. "people of the sun" by RATM is a good example of when you have to do that.

    btw htag... your sig is hilarious. is that from a movie or something?
     
  15. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Oyster, the raking isn't meant for string skipping. I would rake (which really isnt the proper term) each time on adjacent strings, but when i skip, i usually have 1 finger on the higher and 1 on the lower, and alternate my third finger in usually on the higher string.
     
  16. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    I play that the way Angus describes it, that way just seems much more normal to me. I've always played adjacent string licks that way.

    For non adjacent or string skipping, I play it the way that Oysterman described.
     
  17. I use a pick. :D
     
  18. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Nobody's perfect. ;) :D
     
  19. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    :D
     
  20. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    Well, the way I would play that is alternating between index and middle finger, with the index on the lower string. But that's because one of my bad habits is using the middle finger for the higher strings because it's longer.

    Angus, your technique if I understand correctly seems like it's wasteful because you're always plucking one muted string, and your plucking finger needs to move a greater distance. With the one-finger-per-string technique, each finger only has to move a little bit.

    So ... the question becomes, how do you play this:

    0 0 7 0 0 7 0 0 7 0 0 7

    type of thing. My bad habit would be m,i,m,m,i,m,m,i,m etc, raking the middle from the 7 down to the open string. But I've found when I work on strict alternate plucking on these sorts of patterns, something somewhere in a real song becomes easier to play.

    Recently I've been trying to play the arpeggios near the end of Jacob's Ladder (an odd (13!) time signature so you start with the i on one bit, then the m the next time) with strict alternate plucking. You can learn a lot about your habits by doing this sort of thing.