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(Weird) TRUSS ROD REPLACEMENT Question

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by King Weapon, Apr 18, 2010.


  1. King Weapon

    King Weapon

    Sep 20, 2005
    Brooklyn, NY
    Hey all! Here goes...
    I have a Fender American Standard Precision Bass from 1998. I brought it to a tech for a set up and he gave me some very unfortunate news. I live in NY where the apartments have very dry radiator heat and it seems that my truss rod had been "maxed out" as he called it. He is not able to adjust it any further. He claims this is due to the modern Fenders being built with DOUBLE ACTING Truss Rods. He says that Single Acting Truss Rods are better equipped to deal with climate change, thick strings, years of playing/torture... and the Double Acting ones were just a marketing ploy by Fender.

    What are your opinions on all of this?
    And is it possible to replace a Double Acting Truss Rod with a Single? If not, is it smart to just replace it with another Double Acting Truss Rod again (if it's relatively inexpensive to do so)? Help...
     
  2. Hi.

    Generally a truss rod replacement will cost about twice the value of the neck when talking about bolt-on mid-quality mass produced necks.

    As for swapping a double acting for a single acting, I wouldn't, but that's just a personal preference.

    Regards
    Sam
     
  3. King Weapon

    King Weapon

    Sep 20, 2005
    Brooklyn, NY
    Thanks Sam! How much are we talking here (to replace the truss rod)? And how long does it usually take for these things to get "maxed out"?

    This tech recommended that I replace the neck with a 62 Reissue because it's rosewood (like mine) and has a Single Acting truss rod. The only thing is, I heard that these are more curved and I like the way the flatter modern necks feel.

    What's your opinion on what I should do?
     
  4. Lizooki

    Lizooki

    Feb 24, 2008
    Any reason why you can't pull the truss rod nut and add a couple of small washers?

    Of course, I don't know what a Fender trussrod looks like, but this can be done on 2 of my basses, but not all.


    Matt
     
  5. look back about friday for my thread,i managed to remove the truss`bullet' and add a `shim' i built from a brass tube,it's working! and this neck was ugly,,already been jamming(@8:30AM),,,i'm all excited about it,,you have nothing to lose but relief;)
     
  6. king_biscuit

    king_biscuit Supporting Member

    May 21, 2006
    US
    I really don't think your 1998 American Standard P has a double action (two way) truss rod. I am almost positive it is a single action vintage style compression rod. And yes, you can shim the nut with a washer. Maybe find a new "tech."
     
  7. Hi.


    You're welcome.

    This is just a guess (since we live in very different parts of the world), but I'd say around $400 for a first class job. It's all in the labour though, the truss rod is around $15.

    I'm not a Fender expert by any means, and I don't doubt what You say, but as the folks here are speculating that there aren't a dual acting truss rod in your bass, are You sure there is one?

    If it's a single acting truss rod, the washer repair is easy and an inexpensive cure. It's pretty hard to find an exactly right washer though, but there's plenty of threads about that.


    Come to think of it, it's hard to imagine that a dual acting truss rod has run out of adjustment in the first place.

    Are You able to get a second opinion?

    Regards
    Sam
     
  8. king_biscuit

    king_biscuit Supporting Member

    May 21, 2006
    US
    When I say I'm almost positive, I mean I'm 99.9999% positive :)

    That bass has a single action compression rod if it is a stock American Standard passive Precision.
     
  9. King Weapon

    King Weapon

    Sep 20, 2005
    Brooklyn, NY
    Do you have any proof that 90's basses have a single action truss rod? The guy is pretty well known and respected around here and I doubt he would steer me wrong. Also the modern ones I havre been looking up all say "double action truss rod".

    I'm just curious about where you're getting your info...
     
  10. King Weapon

    King Weapon

    Sep 20, 2005
    Brooklyn, NY
    Hey thanks for your response. Forgive me but I'm not very tech savvy. I have heard of this before but know nothing about it. What does this actually do?
     
  11. Hi.

    When the thread runs out on the rod (as the wood compresses), placing a spacer or a two between the nut and the wood will give that much more thread available for adjustment.

    Regards
    Sam
     
  12. king_biscuit

    king_biscuit Supporting Member

    May 21, 2006
    US

    I have a 96 American Standard Jazz and it is a single action compression rod. I know Fender used some double action rods in the 80s, but as far as I know the American Standard line of basses uses single action compression rods. The current Fender basses use single action compression rods. Where are you seeing modern passive Fender basses with double action rods?
     
  13. King Weapon

    King Weapon

    Sep 20, 2005
    Brooklyn, NY
    Oh I see. Thank you. Is this just for a temporary fix? Because I'm assuming the neck will still eventually max out again right?
     
  14. King Weapon

    King Weapon

    Sep 20, 2005
    Brooklyn, NY
    Here's one:
    http://www.wdmusic.com/bass_neck_rosewood.html

    I am looking for more and will post them...
     
  15. king_biscuit

    king_biscuit Supporting Member

    May 21, 2006
    US
    That is not a Fender neck. I'm saying that "Fender" necks from the the American Standard passive (probably active too) line (1995-2002) have single action compression rods. If you have the stock neck on your bass and it is a 1998 American Standard Precision (passive), your tech is mistaken. Some Fender guitars (Strats/Teles) have bi-flexx truss rods which are still just compression rods AFAIK, but the basses don't have them. Your tech may be confusing the guitars and basses.
     
  16. King Weapon

    King Weapon

    Sep 20, 2005
    Brooklyn, NY
    Thanks for all of your replys. 2 questions though (forgive me because I am not very savvy with these tech topics!).

    1. How is this thing maxed out if it is not a double action truss rod. Shouldn't a single action truss rod be able to handle the tension?

    2. Do you have any proof in what you say? I hope you don't think I'm being rude..haha.. I just would like to SEE a webpage that has these specifications on there.

    Once again... thanks again for your help.
     
  17. Jazz Ad

    Jazz Ad Mi la ré sol Supporting Member

    A single action trussrod is more likely to get out of adjustement than a double action.
    I have never met a double action in a Fender.
     
  18. king_biscuit

    king_biscuit Supporting Member

    May 21, 2006
    US
    I have owned and worked on fender basses since the early 80s. I am not going to search out a website you can do that if you want.

    The wood behind the truss rod nut compresses and you run out of threads. By adding a spacer/washer, you take up the space that was compressed and allow the threads to do their job. Your tech should know this.
     
  19. King Weapon

    King Weapon

    Sep 20, 2005
    Brooklyn, NY
    I really appreciate all the info. So this is what you would recommend to expand the life of my neck?
     
  20. king_biscuit

    king_biscuit Supporting Member

    May 21, 2006
    US
    It is worth a try. It may not necessarily fix your problem, but it won't cost anything but the price of the correct washer(s) to find out.
     

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