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What advice do you offer in learning the G&L tri tone electronics ?

Discussion in 'G&L Bass Forum' started by MAJOR METAL, May 2, 2006.


  1. MAJOR METAL

    MAJOR METAL The Beagle Father Supporting Member

    Hi Everyone

    I picked my G&L up last friday and I am still learining the dynamics of the controls , what adivce would you offer in finding your tone on an ASAT with the tri tone electronics ?. Thanks.
     
  2. lug

    lug

    Feb 11, 2005
    League City, Tx
    Series is for live, Parallel is for recording. Series is just ballsy as all hell but a bit noisy, parallel is much quieter and records great. I personally prefer the middle position on the passive/active/active w/trebleboost switch.
     
  3. Joebone

    Joebone Supporting Member

    Oct 31, 2005
    Los Angeles
    I confronted this a few months ago, and came up with the following decision tree, intended to bring out this particular instrument's personality while optimizing for "quick" attack without sacrificing tonal warmth.

    First off, I wanted to bring out some more mids, so I backed the treble and bass controls off about 2/3, maybe a bit less on the bass. To me, it seemed like the tone controls add boost at each end in some considerable degree, and that "flat" is somewhere near the middle of each control -- too bad they don't have a detent for that position. With this done, I felt I got the instrument to sound more articulate with respect to tonal variation based on touch, and got an interesting personality out of this particular L2K.

    I next chose between passive/active/treble boost. Went with the passive; again, more articulate. If I were in a loud band, I might choose differently.

    With those parameters fixed, I could then effect quick tone changes by switching the pick-up mix, and going from series to parallel. Very, very cool to do that all by toggle instead of twiddling knobs. I generally favored series, as I enjoyed the richness of the sound.

    But as with all things sonic, YMMV...
     
  4. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    The tone controls are cut only, there is no boost of bass or treble to be had out of either of those knobs. However, if "in the middle" is what works for you, use it;)
     
  5. telekaster

    telekaster

    Feb 14, 2005
    San Diego
    I can't get away from all knobs all the way up, both pickups on, in series, and in active mode (no treble boost) when I play with the band or with music at home.

    If I'm playing solo just for fun, the bridge pickup alone can get really funky.

    I haven't laid much down yet, but I would also think parallel mode would record a little better.
     
  6. paulraphael

    paulraphael

    Apr 13, 2006
    Brooklyn
    If you heard me play, you'd stop reading what I write.
    +1
    this is one of the great features ... passive tone controls that can be thought of as offering some boost.

    huh. on my l2k, active mode is a bit more articulate; passive is a little softer and vintage sounding.
     
  7. Joebone

    Joebone Supporting Member

    Oct 31, 2005
    Los Angeles
    Intrigued by some of these responses!

    On the passive/active, I felt that the active was louder and a very nice sound, but also somehow kind of compressed, particularly on the "attack" side of a given sequence of notes. So I would have to work harder to get uniformity on the passive side, but also seemed to get more variety of sound, albeit at a lower volume level. Likewise on vibrato and other left-hand shadings...
     
  8. spideyjg

    spideyjg

    Mar 19, 2006
    San Diego
    $.02....

    Start with both pickups, parallel, and passive. IMHO that is the baseline of the tritone. EQ the knobs and amp to taste.

    Flip to series study the effect, then individual pickups series and parallel.

    Once you are familiar with what those positions give you. Ya got it wired. Active and active treble boost is just more seasoning.

    I'll flip switches and tweak knobs all the time to get where I want to be.

    Jim
     
  9. I always like to have a fiddle with the controls, but that setting is the one I always come back too..
     
  10. billybigmouth

    billybigmouth

    Feb 24, 2006
    Nor Cal USA
    Hey Major Metal, I think I got my ASAT semi-hollow the same week you did by the posts up here (yeay for us! :hyper: ) so I haven't had forever to tweak and think about it. But I have been tracking with it in the studio and done about 4 sessions already and this is what I've learned so far.

    As a reference, I play in an acoustic hybrid band, so my tastes are probably going to lean to the warmer tones and as I'm recording right now, I have also restrung it every time I hear the strings start to deaden.

    For Recording Only, I have yet to play it live with the band.

    For a fat bottom that fills up the lower sphere of the mix: Passive, in series, either both pickups, or just the front pickup for a P type sound. Roll off a little bass for fingerstyle tightness, or run it full out with a pick. Play fingers above or just in front of the front pickup. With a pick, play between the coils of the front pickup. Sounds a little thick alone, but in the mix it's great.

    For slapping: Active no boost, parallel, both pickups. Thumb over the front pickup, fingers plucking between the pickups. Heavenly.

    I was also able to coax a pretty sweet Jazz/fingerstyle tone with passive, in series and just the rear pickup while playing over or behind the rear pickup, but I had to redo the gain structure of the input channel and play with the outboard EQ just a little bit.

    Otherwise, I haven't had to use outboard EQ on this thing at all. My ears and band are undoubtably different than yours, but that's what I've noticed so far with what I've been doing.

    Have fun, I sure am.:D
     
  11. Joebone

    Joebone Supporting Member

    Oct 31, 2005
    Los Angeles
    Spideyjig is spot on about parallel/passive/both pickups on as the starting point! His approach is somewhat the mirror image of mine, as I twiddled tone before going to the toggle options, but each of us seem to work from the notion of fixing on one "basic" setting, and building out from there. However, his post also reminded me that I also started with both pickups, parallel and passive, before dialing in my preferred bass/treble cut/boost, then turning to the various toggle-switch fiddles! I guess you could argue that the tone controls should be the last step in the puzzle, but if I'm correct that those controls, full-up, are not "flat," then it seems better to dial that in first, so as to establish the natural voice of the axe. I do know that my approach got me to a basic set of sounds with which I was very happy, and the convenience of tonal variation based solely on toggling.
     
  12. spideyjg

    spideyjg

    Mar 19, 2006
    San Diego
    Exactamundo Joe! Toggling also gets a 100% repeatable sound.

    I would go neck/parallel for a blues song, both/parallel for a rock one then bridge/series/active for a countryish one.

    The only other change is a slight tweak of the volume.

    Jim
     
  13. DavePlaysBass

    DavePlaysBass

    Mar 31, 2004
    CO
    On my first G&L (L-2500) I started in series. After a while I grew to like parallel (both pups) more in a band setting. Notes higher on the neck could be heard better and the low end was not as boomy. Flipping between active and passive gives a nice change of texture and a little bit of a volume change for the softer tunes. In really boomy rooms, series on the bridge pup has worked for me. I never found a real use for treble boost (except when using flats and wanting to sound like I had rounds).

    Dave
     
  14. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine

    Huh?:confused:
     
  15. MAJOR METAL

    MAJOR METAL The Beagle Father Supporting Member

    What changes are taking place in the pick up with the switch from series to parallel
     
  16. spideyjg

    spideyjg

    Mar 19, 2006
    San Diego
    Via the external wires it outs them literally in series or parallel. Think of the windings side by side in parallel and chained together as one in series.

    Series basically doubles the output. Daveplaysbass has a great diagram and a better explanition than I.

    Jim
     
  17. Sorry that was my son
     
  18. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    OK:)
     
  19. MAJOR METAL

    MAJOR METAL The Beagle Father Supporting Member

    I think I am getting the hang of these Pick ups and electronics ! :hyper: I have been able to get a really great strong fat P bass tone , an Articulate passive J bass tone and Monster dual humbuckers. :bassist:
     
  20. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    Heck ya!
     

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