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What could this be??

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Obsolex, Jul 14, 2003.


  1. Obsolex

    Obsolex Guest

    Nov 17, 2002
    Ok, EADG work perfectly, but when I hit the B, acousticly, it buzzes like a mo-fo, seriously. Should I just change my strings? Because EADG sound perfect...
     
  2. Stephen S

    Stephen S Member

    Apr 10, 2002
    San Bernardino, CA
    Is the B string set any lower then the rest of the strings? Could it be the fact that the B string is looser then the others?
     
  3. Obsolex

    Obsolex Guest

    Nov 17, 2002
    BuMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMp
     
  4. Blueszilla

    Blueszilla Bassist ordinaire

    Apr 2, 2003
    The Duke City
    I hope I'm not insulting anyone, but lots of B's are tapered and if the tapered part is resting in the nut, that will make it buzz if the action is medium to low. Or maybe the nut is defective?
     
  5. Obsolex

    Obsolex Guest

    Nov 17, 2002
    It can't be the nut... EADG work fine... I'll chang'em...
     
  6. Bryan R. Tyler

    Bryan R. Tyler TalkBass: Usurping My Practice Time Since 2002 Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    May 3, 2002
    Connecticut
    Nuts have individual slots cut for each string, so it could very well be that the B string slot is improperly cut while the EADG string slots are fine.
     
  7. I'm not sure why you don't think the nut could be the problem. The nut slots are all cut independently, and unless you have a zero fret, it's quite possible for the B-string slot to be cut too deep while the other slots are fine.

    Also, could the B be set too low at the bridge? You didn't really respond to Stephen S's question about whether it was lower than the others, but in my experience the B sometimes has to be set a little bit higher.

    Maybe you could give us a few more detais about when you hear the buzzing, and what you've checked so far?

    Mike
     
  8. Obsolex

    Obsolex Guest

    Nov 17, 2002
    Well I mean, it's not like this took a while to happen, it just happened, it was fine, then the string was all jacked up.
    It's wierd tuning it too, I took them off and then put them back on, and the tuner was at a different angle that it usually is at. But the B is also really floppy.
    What do you mean by low B? I don't know why it would be the slot, i've had my bass for about 10 months, and it's never done this...
     
  9. Bryan R. Tyler

    Bryan R. Tyler TalkBass: Usurping My Practice Time Since 2002 Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    May 3, 2002
    Connecticut
    Well, the position of the tuning pegs has nothing to do with anything; they're going to change postion any time you change strings anyway. By a "low B," they mean if the string height of your B string at the bridge is different that the other strings, ie lower action. Changing the height of the string at the bridge position raises and lowers the action, and on some basses low action can lead to buzzing. The nut slot could have also worn down over time, especially if it is a plastic nut, and just now results in buzzing. Any of these things can and likely will happen over time to a bass, and some minor setup work is usally all it takes to fix it.

    As for the floppiness of the B, some basses just don't have good B strings due to their construction. This can be aided though by getting a higher-tension B string (like going from a .125 to a .130), as the added tension removes some of the floppiness.
     
  10. So it just started happening? Ah, that's one of those bits of information that's useful for diagnosis! If you'd told us that right at the start, we could have eliminated some of those possibiliites.

    If it changed just recently, and you didn't put on new strings with a different gauge or anything, a couple of possible causes come to mind:

    1) You've had a change in humidity (happens frequently during the summer), and it's enough to make the fretboard swell just a touch so that you don't have enough relief in the neck anymore. Since the B-string has a wider path of vibration than the other strings, it's often the first one to buzz when you don't have enough relief. Do you happen to know how to check and set the relief? If not, there's a description in the TB FAQ at http://www.talkbass.com/forum/misc.php?s=Array[sessionhash]&action=faq&page=2#19

    2) You're using an electronic tuner, and the "calibrate" setting has gotten messed up, so you're actually tuned too low. Again, the B string tends to be touchier about this than the other strings, in my experience.

    3) It's a bit unlikely, but for some reason, the B-string bridge saddle has vibrated so that the screws have loosened, and the saddle is now set too low. Do you know how to adjust the saddle height at the bridge?

    4) If you took the B string off at some point, it got twisted when you put it back on. This can make tuning weird, because you get strange, wobbly sorts of overtones as you go up the neck. It doesn't usually make the string buzz, though.

    5) The changing humidity has caused one of the frets to come loose at the end ans stick up just a little bit. Do you find that the buzzing disappears as you get past any particular fret on the neck, or is worse right at one particular fret?

    Anybody have any other ideas?

    Mike
     
  11. Obsolex

    Obsolex Guest

    Nov 17, 2002
    It buzzes all over the B I THINK, but mostly on open to like 7. An yeah, there is a change of humidity and weather, at my house it's about 70-90 degres tops, and here it's about 100 on average.
     
  12. My first guess would definately be the relief, then, though it still could be something else.

    Try fretting the string at the 1st and 15th frets, then (while you're fretting at both ends!) see how much space there is between the string and the 7th fret. It's sort of a preference thing, but the normal starting place is with about the thickness of a business card between the string and the fret. 5 strings sometimes need a little more, though.

    Also, be sure and check it for all the strings, just to be sure some weird twist hasn't developed in the neck or something.

    If there's too little relief (too little space between the string and the fret in the middle), that can definately cause a buzz on the 1-7 frets. You can get mroe relief by loosening the truss rod. That FAQ link should explain how to do it.

    Mike
     
  13. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    this is a setup issue, not bass related. so off to setup it goes...
     
  14. Try another B string. How old are the strings anyway?

    I have taken a B string off and put it back on, was tuning it up and then it was slack and started buzzing. On closer inspection, the string was just old, where it wrapped around the tuning peg, metal fatigue had been causes so when i tightened the string it was just unravelling the turns of wire that make a string.

    Put a new B on and all was okay.

    I would also check your action when the string is tuned up to pitch. Tune it with a electronic tuner then use Harmonic Tuning to tell if you are in the right octave hehe done that before. B strings are funny buggers.

    :D:D

    Merls
     
  15. Obsolex

    Obsolex Guest

    Nov 17, 2002
    Dude Merlin, that's exactly what's happening with my B... I'll just get a whole new set, there kind of old, not more than 2 to 4 months...
     
  16. Let us know how it goes. After you try a new set you may have to adjust the action. I find i did after that episode... ghosts in my guitar i tell ya!

    :D:D

    Merls