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What do I do with an A#6 and G chord?

Discussion in 'Ask Michael Dimin' started by rabid_granny, Mar 26, 2003.


  1. My singer sometimes comes up with songs by shifting guitar chords - in this case, he was goofing around with a G major chord shape...

    650066 A#6 (?)

    320033 G major

    Questions:

    1) Did I describe the A# chord properly? Is it an A#6 or an A# major add 6? I'm weak on chord theory outside of major and minor...

    2) How do I construct a bass line around those two chords? The G chord should be a G minor chord but he's playing a G major chord. Which notes are acceptable when he's playing the A# chord? And the G chord? My lead guitarist said that soloing through this is like navigating a minefield. When he's playing the G chord, I play as if it's a G minor except I don't play the third.
     
  2. Christopher

    Christopher

    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    2d chord is either Gmin7 or Bbmin6.

    What chord comes after that? Might determine which it is and what sort of root motion you want to undertake.

    Also, how do you play "as if it's the G minor except I don't play the third"? The third usually defines the major/minor quality of the chord.
     
  3. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin

    Dec 11, 1999
    Clinician: EA, Zon, Boomerang, TI. Author "The Art of Solo Bass"
    Nick,
    A#6 (or more likely Bb 6) is the chord. An appropriate scale to play over this is the major pentatonic based on the root: Bb, C, D, F, G and Bb.

    The second chord is defintely a G major. I am not sure why it is "should to be a G minor".

    These changes are not diatonic (in one key) to any particular key. With that in mind, I'd probably play a Bb Major form to a G major form. But I would have to actually hear the feel to get a better sense of what the possibilities are. For example, something with a blues or rock feel, you might be able to throw in a blues scale or minor pentatonic over the G chord.

    Chirs,
    the 2nd chord has a B natural in it. You wouldn't find a B natural in either the G minor chord or the Bbmin6 chord

    Mike

    Mike
     
  4. Christopher

    Christopher

    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    Yeah, mea culpa. The "questionable" chord is the 1st one, not the 2d one, as I mistakenly wrote.

    That's what happens when you stare at a computer screen for 10 hours straight.
     
  5. I thought the G should be minor because of the first chord. If it was an A#6 and the A# was the root, then G would be the 6th and it would be minor. There is no third chord (yet?) but I'll goof around with what you and Chris have posted.
     
  6. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin

    Dec 11, 1999
    Clinician: EA, Zon, Boomerang, TI. Author "The Art of Solo Bass"
    Nick,
    The G chord has a B natural in it - making it a major chord. These two chords do not belong to the same key.

    Mike
     
  7. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    G isn't the 6th of A# - it's the diminished 7th. G is the 6th of Bb. If I were you, I'd think of it as Bb, not A#. It's far more helpful, calling it A# throws all sorts of sharps into the picture - it's gonna be far easier to go with Bb I'd say.