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What is a Dreadnought Guitar? And How can I tell if my Acoustic is Dreadnought?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by AlphaMale, Sep 7, 2008.


  1. AlphaMale

    AlphaMale

    Oct 30, 2006
    Ventura County
    What is a Dreadnought Guitar? And How can I tell if my Acoustic is Dreadnought?

    What are the other kinds of guitars and the differences?
     
  2. HollowBassman

    HollowBassman

    Jun 24, 2007
    Hancock, MD
    Dreadnought is a body shape that is a little flatter, more square at the bottom, whereas a Jumbo is very round. I'll try to post pics of each. There are others too, but those are common.


    EDIT:

    Dreadnought
    [​IMG]

    Jumbo
    [​IMG]
     
  3. rob2966

    rob2966

    Oct 19, 2006
    Vancouver, BC
    It is a type of body shape for acoustic guitars. Many country & western style guitars are dreadnoughts. The are recognizable by being a bit larger and, they typically are somewhat flat on the ends.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreadnought_(guitar_type)

    There are many other body shapes out there and difference manufacturers seem to use different terminology.

    Later
    Rob
     
  4. AlphaMale

    AlphaMale

    Oct 30, 2006
    Ventura County
    Some guy told my friend at the local store that Dreadnoughts are cheaper and have an inferior sound, I don't think this is true, is it?
     
  5. HollowBassman

    HollowBassman

    Jun 24, 2007
    Hancock, MD
    I've never heard that. Many famous guitarists use dreadnoughts. I have one and I like it.
     
  6. burk48237

    burk48237 Supporting Member

    Nov 22, 2004
    Oak Park, MI
    The Dreadnought is a specific size and shaped body style for acoustic guitars. It was developed by Martin (the D series) back in 1931. The increased depth and slightly increased width in the low end brought a more balanced sound with a lot more projection then the current body styles of the time. The Dreadnought body style has became the most popular body style for acoustic guitars. And Martin no longer has an exclusive on the style.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreadnought_(guitar_type)

    http://www.mguitar.com/history/dreadnought.php
     
  7. SoComSurfing

    SoComSurfing Mercedes Benz Superdome. S 127. R 22. S 12-13.

    Feb 15, 2002
    Mobile, Al
    What is your particular guitar in question?
     
  8. SoComSurfing

    SoComSurfing Mercedes Benz Superdome. S 127. R 22. S 12-13.

    Feb 15, 2002
    Mobile, Al
    This is a completely idiotic statement. That's basically the equivalent of saying that basses with P-Bass-style bodies are cheaper and inferior.
     
  9. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Retired Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    They may or may not be cheaper.
     
  10. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Retired Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Dreadnaught. Note squared-off back end and shallow waist cut.

    [​IMG]

    Not dreadnaught. Note deeper waist cut and rounded bum. Both dreadnaughts and artist shapes can have cutaways.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    The guy is obviously lying to you to get you to buy something else, with a higher markup. Every acoustic I've owned is a Dreadnought (with the exception of one) and sounded phenomenal.

    Let your ears decide which sounds better. Jumbos tend to be a little heavier on the bass frequencies where dreadnoughts from my experience, have a more even sound. Hence, why I prefer dreadnoughts.
     
  12. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    No. As a matter of fact the statement is downright asinine. It would probably be wise to completely ignore any other "wisdom" from whoever offered that little nugget.
     
  13. The Dreadnaught was the first truly modern battleship. Enough so that it entirely changed the way battleships were constructed.

    Sort of like the US Iowa Class battleships did 40 years later.

    If your battleship doesn't have 9 guns of 12" or larger, I don't think it can qualify as a Dreadnaught. That's not to say it can't be a fine battleship...
     
  14. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    I was thinking of that, too. :)
     
  15. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Retired Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Nines and twelves are pea-shooters. Iowa class battleships had 16-inch guns. Later armament included Tomahawk cruise missiles, Harpoon anti-ship missiles and Phalanx weapons systems. A very nasty beast. Not the kind of thing whose captain you'd want pissed off at you.
     
  16. Heh. Jumbos are like fine women.
     
  17. In the grand scheme of things, nines and twelves are still badass. I've worked on 60mm, 81mm and 4.2" mortars as well as 155mm self-propelled- those will lay down some serious steel on target.

    During Desert Shield, the Wisconsin was out in the Gulf- knowing we were a light infantry unit facing the 4th largest tank army in the world with virtually no armor support- Knowing the Wisconsin was there with those 16 inchers with a 26 mile range was comforting. Some people might be bothered by having a battleship doing gunnery over their heads. It gave me a warm, fuzzy feeling.

    Of course, there was also the Japanese Yamato with her 18.1" guns...
     

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