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What is "closed position"?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Lovebown, Dec 15, 2002.


  1. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Hey, I know about chords in inversions but what I don't know (don't think so atleast) is a chord played in "closed" position, as oposed to played in "open"?
    Could someone explain?

    Thanks,
    Lovebown
     
  2. Gard

    Gard Commercial User

    Mar 31, 2000
    Greensboro, NC, USA
    General Manager, Roscoe Guitars
    It's a matter of spacing of the notes. A closed postion chord has all the notes as close together as possible - within one octave; while in an open postion they will be spread further apart - in different octaves. You can have a closed voice chord in any inversion, as well as an open voiced chord.
     
  3. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    I see... thanks

    /lovebown
     
  4. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    Gosh, I have a different understanding of the meaning of "closed chord," especially in guitar chords. I understood it to mean a chord played with no open strings, therefore the same chord can be played up and down the neck, while a chord played with an open string in its formation can be played only in one part of the fretboard.

    Even on a bass wherein chords are played note-by-note, the "open chord" has at least one note played on an open string, while a closed chord, having no open string, could be played anywhere on the neck.

    Still Gard's definition makes perfect sense, too. I hadn't heard chords greater than an octave be referred to as "open chords", but I see no reason why Gard's definition isn't also correct. Maybe Love Bown should consider the context in which an "open" or "closed chord" is mentioned.

    To be clear, I am in no way disputing Gard's definition. I'm just saying I know of a different definition, too. (I don't want to get Gard mad at me. He is one of my TalkBass heroes.)

    P.S. Chords, when played on a piano or keyboard, are closed if they are played with one hand and open if they are played with two hands.
     
  5. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Ok I think I got it now... I actually knew this from theory class but didn't know it was called closed position in english.

    What I was reffering to has nothing to do with guitars boplicity so thats probably a diffrent closed position thingie :p

    Thanks anyhow...

    /lovebown
     
  6. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    I checked into it further as I was interested in the characterization of open and closed chords and realize that it can also refer to "voicings" of chords. In other words, the inversions or rearrangement of the notes that make up any particular chord...just as Gard said.
     
  7. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Yah ok.. makes sense.. thanks

    /lovebown