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What is "MWAH"

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by LowDown Hal, Sep 12, 2008.


  1. help educate a n00b... :help:

    THANKS
     
  2. Toastfuzz

    Toastfuzz

    Jul 20, 2007
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Its that sound that goes "mwah mwah mwah" like if you say "mwah" thats what it sounds like. Mwah. Mwah.
     
  3. Jonyak

    Jonyak

    Oct 2, 2007
    Ottawa, Ont
    it is a tonal characteristic of fretless basses. generaly made by sliding into a note.

    hence the mwahhhhhhh.
     
  4. synaesthesia

    synaesthesia

    Apr 13, 2004
    UK
  5. jmac

    jmac

    May 23, 2007
    Horsham, Pa
    mwah is the sound that many fretless players wish to obtain. The more mwah sound the better.
     
  6. kojak

    kojak

    Jan 25, 2008
    Oslo, Norway
    Endorsing Artist: Mayones
    in a recent thread, "mwaah" was used as a onomatapoeticon, for the sound that a fretless is able to make. its partly your fingers, but the way the tone swells. I played around with a EBS BassIQ today, and you can get a quite nice "mwaah" out of that one btw!
     
  7. it means someone is giving you a *kiss*
     
  8. Traver

    Traver

    Sep 25, 2007
    For some reason this thread made me laugh.
     
  9. Mwah is a term people use to try to describe the sound a fretless makes as you slide up to, or down from, a fingered note.

    On a fretted bass, sliding between 2 frets won't change the pitch of the note but on a fretless you get a little "mwah" as you come up (or down) to the desired note when sliding "between frets". You can also get full length "mwah" by sliding right up or down or both, but we don't do that...

    ...at least not much ;)
     
  10. Cernael

    Cernael

    Jun 28, 2008
    I've read that you gat more "mwah" with the "right" kind of fingerboard, IIRC ebony being a highmwah wood, for instance. And that you get more from roundwound strings than from flatwound.

    Would someone in the actual know expound on that? Pretty please?
     
  11. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
  12. Sure. I own a Tony Franklin Fretless. It has an unfinished ebony fretboard. It's got mwah :D
     
  13. I'm too lazy(as are the other posters apparently:D)but go youtube up some Tony Franklin, Mark Egan, Bakithi Kumalo, Michael Manring, Steve Lawson, certain Pino Palladino, 'fretless bass', etc. What's that Pink Floyd tune- 'on the turning away' is the opening lyric, IIRC. A small smattering of textbook mwah.
     
  14. hey

    hey

    Jul 8, 2006
    Wisconsin
    Go to 1:40 in this video:

    Great example of "Mwah" up unto 2:02
     
  15. D.A.R.K.

    D.A.R.K. Supporting Member

    Aug 20, 2003
    Virginia
    i always thought mwah was the name of the language the adults speak in those charlie brown cartoons....
     
  16. Pretty sure SOS by ABBA is played on a fretless as well. The intro is "mwah"-y.
     
  17. BassyBill

    BassyBill The smooth moderator... Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 12, 2005
    West Midlands UK
  18. gkbass13

    gkbass13 Supporting Member

    Mar 29, 2006
    Chicago
    play the lowest E on the d string of a fretless bass, then slide up to G. that is mwah.
     
  19. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Mwah makes me suicidal. First off, it's a horrible word. Second, blaze your own trail and don't try to sound like Jaco because it never works.
     
  20. Deacon_Blues

    Deacon_Blues

    Feb 11, 2007
    Finland
    Mwah is the word to describe how the sound "grows" after you've plucked a note on a fretless. It doesn't have to include any sliding. Just fret a random note on your fretless, pluck the note with your thumb at the beginning of the neck, and it will start growing. I have a hard time getting the mwah sound in any other ways on my Squier VM fretless jazz... :meh:
     

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