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WHAT IS THIS OLD FENDER, SPECIAL, DELUXE OR JUST A JAZZ?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by anderbass, Apr 4, 2006.


  1. anderbass

    anderbass

    Dec 20, 2005
    Phoenix. Az.
    View attachment 32417

    View attachment 32418 What do I have here, (year-model)? The neck reads Fender Jazz Bass. made in usa. neck ser.# S7 37614. Neck plate: A big letter f and #277652. This bass has (mother of pearl?) fret markers and a rather nice white neck inlay around the fretboard. It now has twin vol. and twin tone pots. Under the pick guard, It looks like the pot cavity, (closest to bridge) has been bored out, to add the fourth pot. I'm thinking its a 77 jazz special. Am I wrong?
     
  2. KPJ

    KPJ

    Oct 2, 2001
    Methuen, MA USA
    No such thing as a 77 Jazz Special. What you have is a 77 Jazz neck on a Precision body, either aFender or a copy, that has had Jazz pickup installed in the bridge position.
     
  3. What he said. It's pretty nice, but it has no original value. Does the body have a 3 bolt neck plate? The pickups should be dated as well (did they still do this in the late 70s?). The J pickup has been added as well as the extra pots/knobs to control the J's volume and tone.
     
  4. anderbass

    anderbass

    Dec 20, 2005
    Phoenix. Az.
    when I instaled the jazz pup. the cavity sure looked factory machined. Did all the 77 jazz necks come with this type of fret markers, and the white inlay around fretboard?
     
  5. anderbass

    anderbass

    Dec 20, 2005
    Phoenix. Az.
    Its got the 4 bolt neck. It was missing the j-pup when I got it, I have not checked the p-pup for date yet.
     
  6. RobertUI

    RobertUI Thumper Supporting Member

    Apr 7, 2005
    Herndon, VA - NoVa
    not all of the 77 Jazz necks had "binding" and block inlays, but that's certainly a common characteristic of the 70s necks. i'd say you've got a pretty nice parts bass there, and if it plays and sounds good, and you're pleased with what you paid, then good job!
     
  7. anderbass

    anderbass

    Dec 20, 2005
    Phoenix. Az.
    . Thanks RobertUI, The bass does play and sound great. I paid $100.00 for it 10 years ago. I find it kinda hard to beleve that fender just randomly equiped some 70s necks, with bindings and block inlays, didnt charge any more for them, and did not give basses equipped with these necks any special option name or ser.# Does that sound right?
     
  8. Basically, after 1971 or so, all Jazz necks were bound and blocked. For a bit they were rosewood/white pearl, and a couple years later when they began using maple (and often ash bodies) almost exclusively, most were maple/black pearl. Near the end of the decade, I believe, they started using rosewood again, with white blocks, as well as maple with white blocks. By the end of the 70s they started making one piece pickguards, walnut finishes, and all kinds of wacky stuff (some was pretty nice, though). Oh, and P basses never had binding. Back in the day Fender didn't have fancy options... in fact, bound necks were standard on the 70s models, and I'm sure some were annoyed by them... their appearance can be argued either way, and they can be annoying to refret. However, I happen to love them.

    100$? I'd pay up to 1000$ for a well-playing bass like that, especially with an authentic neck. Most mid to late 70s J's have a 3 bolt neck plate... I'm assuming the body is either a replacement, or an earlier one.... in which case the serial number would be directly on the neck plate. Anyways, if you aren't planning to sell it... not a big deal anyways. There are collectible basses you would die for, but if you can't play em and enjoy them for what they are, you can't appreciate them as much.... players' basses are where it's at.

    EDIT: So there is a serial number on the neck plate... I read right over that part. The number should date it between 1968 and 1970, assuming it's a Fender. You have some kind of mixed up parts bass... but an old P body with a J neck, both original Fenders - that's pretty interesting!
     
  9. 4runner

    4runner WARNING!"WALL OF DOOM" does "exceed" 140 decibels!

    Feb 11, 2006
    Hackensack NJ,
    Hey anderbass, I own, and study, "vintage Fender" Jazz basses because I really love them. Your Bass Appears to be a 1977, Especially if it has a "Bullet" truss rod; that's the chrome bullet shaped object, that sticks out of the headstock, just above the nut {couldn't tell from the photo}, used to adjust the neck. Also, the model #,prefix on the headstock "S7", is for, Seventy 7. I had a '77 neck, on a new "warmouth" jazz body, and the model #was,
    S740100. The Great "Marcus Miller" has A '77 JB, and his model # is, S732742. So, I hope this helps you date your instrument.:bassist:
     
  10. anderbass

    anderbass

    Dec 20, 2005
    Phoenix. Az.
    Thanks jenderfazz, Is there any way to confirm that, this p-body is a 68-70 fender, and not just the neck plate on a newer or aftermarket body?
     
  11. anderbass

    anderbass

    Dec 20, 2005
    Phoenix. Az.
    Yes you are corect, It does have a bullet truss rod.
     
  12. KPJ

    KPJ

    Oct 2, 2001
    Methuen, MA USA
    Take the neck off and look for a date in the neck pocket of the body. If the bass was refinished, this may be missing. Fender put the dates of manufacture on the butt of the neck for the necks and inside the neck pocket for the bodies. If thee is a date, it is most likely a Fender body, if there isn't it still could be, just a little harder to verify.
     
  13. tkozal

    tkozal

    Feb 16, 2006
    New York City
  14. anderbass

    anderbass

    Dec 20, 2005
    Phoenix. Az.
    Thanks for all the great info. I'm still not sure what I should call this bass. Assuming that my body is in fact a 69 fender. whats the corect term to use for this axe?
     
  15. 7flat5

    7flat5

    Nov 28, 2003
    Upstate NY
    Well, you can call it a poo-cocker-span-hund or you can just call it a dog.
     
  16. Lorenzini

    Lorenzini

    Dec 31, 2004
    Los Angeles
    It's a Fender Precision Jazz in the fullest sense.
     
  17. anderbass

    anderbass

    Dec 20, 2005
    Phoenix. Az.
    Should I be insulted or laughing?
     
  18. KPJ

    KPJ

    Oct 2, 2001
    Methuen, MA USA
    To paraphrase Gertrude Stein: "A bass by any other name will still sound as sweet."
     
  19. bassaussie

    bassaussie

    Oct 6, 2001
    Portugal


    Anderbass, it's just a parts bass. There's no specific term, but if you were thinking of advertising it (for instance), you'd just say it was a Fender bass with a Jazz neck and Precision body (adding in all the information regarding age etc).

    To be honest, as a functional instrument, it's probably an excellent instrument - many people think the combination you've got represents the best qualities of the two instruments. However, as a vintage instrument, it's not really worth a great deal. The most valuable part of the instrument is the neck - it's reasonably intact, you've got the original tuners, and, at worst, it's probably been redrilled to accept the 4 bolt neck plate. What you really need to do is go over the whole instrument and try and identify how much is original, and what age those parts are, as well as how much modification work has been done.

    One thing that MIGHT (and I stress MIGHT!!!) help you is to date the pots by their source code. If any of the pots are original, they'll have a code on them that will indicate when they were made. This will give you an approximate age for the body, although, obviously, you have to take other things into account - mainly as to whether the pots are original or not. However, say those pots match up roughly to the date of the neckplate, then you'd certainly have a stronger reason to believe that the body is in fact from 1969 (or thereabouts). The pots will have a 7 digit code that will read 137-yyww, where the "yy" is the year, and the "ww" is the week. The first 3 digits could also be "304", but "137" is more likely (the first 3 digits indicate the manufacturer of the pot). Now, one thing to note is that, if the body is in fact from 1969, then the pots may date from 1966, as Fender bought a large quantity of pots from CTS ("137") around this time that lasted them for a number of years.

    In a similar fashion, you could also check the Precision pickup. If it's original, it may have a hand written date on the back of it - if it's from 1969, as you suspect, then the backing would grey, with the hand written date. Again, this is just evidence to point you in the right direction.

    Another thing - check in the neck pocket to see if it's got the original paddle mark. When Fender painted their bodies, they attached a small paddle to the neck pocket to hang the body by - it's about one inch by 2 (more or less). If that's there, then it's an indicator that the finish may be original.
     
  20. 7flat5

    7flat5

    Nov 28, 2003
    Upstate NY
    :D You should be laughing. I didn't mean at all that the bass is a dog. Just that it is not a brand-name model. It's a bass. In fact, my intended implication was that the best dogs are usually of the blended variety, if you will. This bass seems like it should be a real player. Frankly, it is also quite attractive.
     

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