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What is this technique called, and how do you do it?

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by bassplayertom77, Sep 28, 2008.


  1. bassplayertom77

    bassplayertom77

    Sep 24, 2008
    A lot of people do it, but I'll use Vic Wooten and Tal Wilkenfeld as examples.

    It's like a trill, but their left hand slides lightning fast between two notes. It's so quick, I can't wrap my head around it. It's so cool. Any links or help would be appreciated.

    It's probably so simple.
     
  2. Thump Jr.

    Thump Jr.

    Jun 8, 2008
    SW FL
    It looks to me like an application of fretless-style vibrato to a fretted instrument.

    As to how you do it? I'd suggest . . . sliding your hand lightning-fast between two notes.
     
  3. It sounds a lot faster than it actually is, and usually sounds better with very new/ bright strings.

    Call it the bumblebee technique if you must have a name.
     
  4. bassplayertom77

    bassplayertom77

    Sep 24, 2008

    Thanks Thump Jr, it's all so clear to me now.;)
    Sincerely, that was funny.
     
  5. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Funny but true. Just try to make it steady and do it to accent the music, not to show off. Also, bear in mind that sometimes they don't go between two frets. They just do a wide vibrato on one fret.
     
  6. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    I think it's called a "shake".
    Back in the '70s, EW&F's "Shing Star" was a big tune for that technique.
     
  7. bassplayertom77

    bassplayertom77

    Sep 24, 2008
    EXACTLY! How is this done? Is it reallt just as simple as sliding quickly between notes?
     
  8. ryco

    ryco

    Apr 24, 2005
    97465
    More of pivoting on your thumb on the back of the neck while rolling the finger on the fret board back and forth.
    I mean, you *could* slide your whole hand as one rigid unit, but takes a lot more energy.
     
  9. bassplayertom77

    bassplayertom77

    Sep 24, 2008
    Thanks everyone for helping me demystify this.

    Isn't it funny that you have practice certain techniques often, only to use them sparingly?
     
  10. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    I just tried it...my thumb actually comes off the back of the neck.YMMV.
     
  11. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    I would say so.
    The 'trick' is to pick your spot(s) & make it musical.
     

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