Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

What kind of wood is this?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Tihi, Jan 26, 2006.


  1. Hi there!

    I presume this is ASH, but can't tell wich type.
    the weight of the body is 5lbs. 9 oz.

    Thanks!
     
  2. BurningSkies

    BurningSkies CRAZY BALDHEAD

    Feb 20, 2005
    Seweracuse, NY
    Ash is ash...When you see describers like 'swamp' or 'northern' its not necessarily a scientific definition as much as a marketing describer. Swamp ash is usually used to describe ash that is lighter...
     
  3. I'm no expert, but I think that heavier and lighter wood do also have different tonal characteristics.
    Thanks!
     
  4. Cliff Bordwell

    Cliff Bordwell Commercial User

    Jan 6, 2004
    USA , Orlando , Florida
    Owner of CB BASSES
    From that picture and the fact that it is a "Fender" shape
    I would say that it is Alder.
     
  5. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    +1, and yeah, that's ash.
     
  6. Marcus Willett

    Marcus Willett Supporting Member

    Feb 8, 2005
    Palm Bay, FL
    Endorsing Artist: Bag End - Dean Markley - Thunderfunk
    What I have been told, and my understanding is that "swamp" ash is in fact the same species as "regular" hard ash, fraxinus americana. What makes it "swamp" ash, is when that tree is growing in....well, swampy areas. Or more to the point; a portion of the tree is under water. This causes the sap in the part of the tree that is submerged to either leech out entirely or be diluted. The result being that when the wood is dried, it is structurally the same as hard ash but lighter.

    You can get some pretty friggin' light swamp ash bodies if you want. I bought a 5 string J body from Warmoth in swamp ash that came in at 3lbs, 6oz.
     
  7. Common misconception.... different woods just sound different. There is no direct correlation that heavier woods sound better or vice versa.
     
  8. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    Misconception???? Sounds to me like you're both saying exactly the same thing!

    BTW, I happen to agree diff woods sound diff. PART of what makes one piece diff may be its density/weight, but not necessarily all. IMHO.
     
  9. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Despite it being a fender shape, the grain looks more like ash to me.
     
  10. Well I suck at english. Uhh... let's see... if i could rephrase

    "Common misconception.... In case you're categorizing heavy woods sound this way and lighter woods sound this way... don't. Different woods just sound different. There is no direct correlation that heavier woods sound like A and light woods sound like B."

    and if that doesn't make sense don't correct it so i can feel better about myself.
     
  11. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    I'm not saying you're incorrect, because you ARE correct! You're simply not disagreeing with anything he actually said. That's all.

    He just said heavier woods sound different than lighter woods. That's very general and accurate, and not contrary to what you're saying at all. He didn't say what they sounded like, just that it's different. That's also correct. Density/weight affects tone. It's a simple and true fact of life.

    Look again...

    You agree. Deal with it. :)
     
  12. Fenders also come with Ash bodies..
     
  13. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Correct, but i find that irrelevant considering i doubt that is a Fender brand body. :)
     
  14. Vic

    Vic There's more music in the nuance than the notes. Gold Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Central Illinois
    Staff, Bass Gear Magazine
    This is VERY interesting. I always wondered about what that meant. I mean, I think it's commonly understood when they say "swamp ash" it means it's lighter, but I never heard an explanation before. Makes perfect sense to me.
     
  15. tribal3140

    tribal3140 Banned

    Nov 9, 2004
    near detroit...uh
    100% white ash. I'll put ten dolla on it:D
    the alder color is coming from the patina on the varnish, looks aged, or was mixed with a yellow brown to get that aged effect.
    nice aged effect or patina though.
    Todd
     
  16. McHack

    McHack

    Jul 29, 2003
    Central Ohio!
    Looks like a big ole slab of Swamp Ash to me. As for differing varieties,,, who knows. I'd bet Tribal is right, just because its his job to know wood.
     
  17. BurningSkies

    BurningSkies CRAZY BALDHEAD

    Feb 20, 2005
    Seweracuse, NY
    The fun part of things is that you can get different density of wood from the same tree, so you might get a piece from one part of the trunk that gets marketed as 'swamp ash' due to low density, while you might get 'hard ash' or 'northern ash' to describe a plank from the same tree!
     
  18. dave_p

    dave_p

    Dec 20, 2005
    CT
  19. Why do you think that?
     
  20. Moo

    Moo Banned

    Dec 14, 2002
    Oakland, CA
    No, swamp ash trees don't grow underwater. Even parts of them. Ever see a lake with trees growing out of it? You can get "swamp ash" boards 10 feet long and that would require at least that much of the tree to be grown underwater making harvesting a bit of a drag. ;) Lots of water can make a tree grow fast and less dense but the trunk is not underwater.

    At 5 pounds 9 ounces this is heavy ash any ways. The warmoth site has some great pictures with weights listed to compare to.