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what makes a bass "rock" or "jazz"?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by TRAX, Oct 11, 2005.


  1. TRAX

    TRAX Guest

    Sep 16, 2005
    what things do u find in a bass that makes it for "rock" or "jazz"?
     
  2. ras1983

    ras1983

    Dec 28, 2004
    Sydney, Australia
    I find the tone of the band is more important than tone of the bass. I've seen jazz performances with p's and 'Ray's, and J's and everything else in between. Likewise, we've seen all sorts of basses in rock. If the band has an aggressive sound, then an aggresive sounding bass would sound great. If the band has a more mellow sound then a more mellow bass would sound great. Ofcourse there are always exceptions, JPJ used a J in much of Zeppelin's work and it sounded drop-dead gorgeous.
     
  3. It may be just me, but I dont like the sound of a really growly or clicky sounding bass in jazz (A ric for example, or P-Bass) however I love that warmer woody sound you get from Jazz basses and whatnot. You also get those in between basses like Warwicks that have a growl, but also feel warm on the low end.

    But like Ras said, a Jazz Bass is a Jazz Bass on paper only, you could play it any any situation. Same with any other bass.
     
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    That easy!!

    Bass Guitar = Rock!

    Double Bass = Jazz!


    ;)
     
  5. AZNBassist

    AZNBassist

    Jan 14, 2004
    Denton
    I agree.

    Acoustic Upright is the bass for jazz

    Electric Bass GUitar is the bass for rock

    BTW, i dont get why Fender called his second model the jazz bass, since many ppl use it to play many other genres besides jazz, and since in my honest opinion (i said its MY opinion, dont flame me) it has a more trebly high end sound, which is not very suited for playing nice, solid walking lines which are prevalent in the majority of jazz.
     
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I've read that the Fender Jazz was really aimed at guitarists who wanted to double on bass, with its narrower neck - but the name is just about being "hip" - at the time, "Jazz" was associated with anything "cool" or trendy....
     
  7. danomite64

    danomite64

    Nov 16, 2004
    Tampa, Florida
    [​IMG]
    Jazz Bass
    Jazzus Bassus


    [​IMG]
    Rock Bass
    Ambloplites rupestris
     
  8. I'd say the difference is the player,not the bass itself.
     
  9. ClassicJazz

    ClassicJazz Bottom Feeders Unite!! Supporting Member

    Sep 19, 2005
    Delray Beach, Florida
    Well said.....

    Good example.......

    John Paul Jones......Led Zeppelin........Rock......Fender Jazz
    Jaco.....................Weather Report....Jazz......Fender Jazz

    Same bass.....two styles!
     
  10. SteveC

    SteveC Supporting Member

    Nov 12, 2004
    North Dakota
    The way you play it.
     
  11. mark beem

    mark beem Gold Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2001
    New Hope, Alabama
    The person playing it.
     
  12. BassyBill

    BassyBill The smooth moderator... Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 12, 2005
    West Midlands UK
    Spot the correction. ;)
     
  13. reitedasc

    reitedasc

    Jun 23, 2005
    Norway
    I hoped I was the first to say that.
     
  14. Lowtonejoe

    Lowtonejoe Supporting Member

    Jul 3, 2004
    Richland, WA
    What difference does upper/lower case matter. Is the species supposed to be lower case?

    :D

    Joe.
     
  15. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    The player;)

    Just my devalued .02...take a look at my profile-I would take any of my basses to a jazz gig.
     
  16. BassyBill

    BassyBill The smooth moderator... Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 12, 2005
    West Midlands UK
    Correct, well spotted! Genus name has initial capital, species name does not, whole thing in italics (or underlined when handwriting).

    ;) Bill
     
  17. bassjigga

    bassjigga

    Aug 6, 2003
  18. bassjigga

    bassjigga

    Aug 6, 2003
    D'oh! Someone already said that. See what I get for trying to be a smart guy without reading the whole thread first? :cool: