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What Music Knowledge is most important for bass???

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by bongo499, Feb 1, 2005.


  1. bongo499

    bongo499

    Jan 10, 2005
    syosset
    i have been playing bass for more than a year seriously and have gotten pretty good. The past couple fo days i have been interested in learning more about music and theory. I want to ask people what do you think is most important knowledge for a bassist to know abotu music theory. Thank you :cool: :bawl:
     
  2. mikemulcahy

    mikemulcahy

    Jun 13, 2000
    The Abyss
    Learn everything you can. Knowledge gives you options.


    Mike
     
  3. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
  4. Ditto. Master ever subject in music, don't just skim over it, either.
     
  5. IvanMike

    IvanMike Player Characters fear me... Staff Member Supporting Member

    Nov 10, 2002
    Middletown CT, USA
    all of it is good

    2 biggies

    be able to name every note on your fingerboard/play all the positions of any note someone names.

    know the chord tones of every chord
     
  6. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Two really big "biggies"-

    Rhythm
    Harmony
     
  7. PlayTheBass

    PlayTheBass aka Mac Daddy

    Dec 7, 2004
    Carmichael, CA
    Scales, which lead into chords, and then available tensions of those chords (for melodic construction). Start with major and minor scales and the chords there, then go to the other diatonic scales, and then get into altered scales.
     
  8. Against Will

    Against Will Supporting Member

    Dec 10, 2003
    Big Sound Central
    All of it, start with scales and work from there.
     
  9. I'm taking music theory in school and its all been pretty useful to me, even figured bass.

    After all, KNOWLEDGE IS POWER!
     
  10. keb

    keb

    Mar 30, 2004
    Get started on theory as soon as you can. You'll wonder how you ever did without it!
     
  11. Kevjmyers

    Kevjmyers

    Dec 10, 2004
    Boulder. CO
    Every aspect of theory is equally important since all concepts intertwine so beautifully with one another. If I HAD to pick one aspect with regards to importance I would say probably intervalic relationships. Start today!
     
  12. I-Love-Ratm

    I-Love-Ratm

    Feb 24, 2003
    Could someone explain chord tones?Is it like intervals?
     
  13. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Chord tones are the intervals that make up a chord. Root third fifth seventh. Although some folks feel the seventh is a TENSION (like the b9, 9, #9 etc etc).
     
  14. IvanMike

    IvanMike Player Characters fear me... Staff Member Supporting Member

    Nov 10, 2002
    Middletown CT, USA
    kinda sorta but no
    chord tones are all the tones/notes in a given chord.

    for a major chord that woudl be the tonic, (the Root or the "1"), the 3rd (3) and 5th (5) so A is A-C#-E
    for minor that would be 1-flat3-5, a 7th chord is 1-3-5-flat7, major 7th is 1-3-5-7, a minor 7th is 1-flat3-5-flat7, etc

    i belive it was caol kaye who said "average bass lines are built on scales, great bass lines are built on chord tones."

    in tom petty's "running down a dream" the outgoing solo is played over the repitition of C-D-E. to change it up sometimes i play a descending line on the E string G-F#-E. that works because G is the fifth of C, F# is the third of D and E is well, E.
     
  15. nonsqtr

    nonsqtr The emperor has no clothes!

    Aug 29, 2003
    Burbank CA USA
    IMO, the most important thing is the ear. My recommendation would be, play along with CD's and the radio as much as possible. Ear traning is where it's at, and that's the poor man's method for moving in that direction.

    That's where I'd start. Musical notation makes no sense without an ear. Harmony and structure follow.

    Then, there's the "rhythm" part. Drum machines are good. Once in a while, don't get dependent on them though. The whole point is to use them as "practice", not as the gospel. There's no substitute for playing with a live drummer. Do that as much as possible. Jam sessions are good. Pick-up gigs are good. School bands are good. Anything that gets you (a) playing in "real" situations and (b) playing in front of some kind of an audience - even if it's only your own band - is good. :)