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What wood is the Ibanez SR305 made of?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Tom Crofts, Jul 29, 2001.


  1. Tom Crofts

    Tom Crofts

    Mar 15, 2001
    I have an SR305 (bottom of the SR range I think) from 1996 and I was wondering what kind of wood it is made of and whether it would look good at all if I sanded it down to bare wood and then lacquered or waxed it or something. It is a solid colour. Thanks.
     
  2. plywood

    No ! Wait!

    Its particle board
     
  3. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    It is most likely soft maple or basswood, both of which have very unspectacular grain and coloring.

    Neither wood looks good plain, although they may look OK with some kind of stain and an oil finish.
     
  4. Tom Crofts

    Tom Crofts

    Mar 15, 2001
    That's not nice freak!!! Just cos I can't afford a real bass... :(;)
     
  5. I'm not %100 sure, but its prolly basswood.
     
  6. It's definitely Agathis, according to the Ibanez catalogue.
     
  7. Don't worry dude. I'm just being prick. I used to own one.
     
  8. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Ibanez uses agathis for a lot of their instruments, so I don't doubt what PanteraFan says at all.

    It is a huge tree so they get a hell of a lot of lumber out of one cutting. Much/most of it grows in Borneo, Java, Sumatra, that neighborhood.

    It is known as the "softest of the hardwoods" and the "wood that does it all" (flooring, plywood, veneer, musical instruments, etc.).

    Cosmetics aren't much to write home about. The sample I see looks like northern maple, almost white, with almost no noticeable figuring, (its grain is tiny). Very plain but you could go nuts with some stain I guess.
     
  9. 7

    7

    Dec 23, 2000
  10. David-Adler

    David-Adler

    Feb 28, 2001
    Bonn, Germany
    Yes, the 305 is made of Agathis.
    The 4xx is made of Maple
    The 6xx is made of Basswood
    And above is Mahogany

    David
     
  11. lo-end

    lo-end

    Jun 15, 2001
    PA
    hmm... wait... i think it might be... agathis??
     
  12. Tuomas

    Tuomas

    Mar 14, 2000
    Helsinki, Finland
    By the way, does anyone know what that basswood actually is? I know that ibanez and dean and other cheapo-brands like that often use it but what is it like and how does it sound?
     
  13. Cat

    Cat

    Apr 5, 2000
    Penn State
    Cheapo my ass. I have a sr800 and I think it sounds better (to my personal taste) then a lot of upper-priced warwicks. The bass isn't really deep but the midrange and treble sound very nice and bright. Also the sustain is very good, enough so that I've really had to work on my muting since I got it!
     
  14. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Cat is right about basswood, in that, it isn't "cheapo" in the sound department. Its tonal virtues are strong mids and a dark warmth, like alder.

    The downsides are that it is extremely soft, dents easily, and is butt ugly if not covered up with paint/finish, (sort of a sickly white with greyish streaks, no visible grain). So, for those negatives, plus a plentiful supply, it is a cheap wood, price wise.

    One reason Parker uses it in their necks because it is very light weight.
     
  15. The reason basswood is seen as bad is that it is used on a lot of entry level instruments..the alternatives are often made from agathis or poplar, which IMO are not too good. Basswood makes a very good back or core to a bass, IME.
     
  16. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    I prefer poplar to bassword myself, tonewise for a bass.

    IMHO basswood doesn't have a very solid low end. Poplar does. At least that has been my experience.
     
  17. Well, my bass is poplar, and I've found the other way. The company that makes my bass recently started using basswood in place of the poplar, and the basswood had more of a low end on my amp, but nowhere near as many low-mids. My bass cuts a lot more in the mix. I still prefer poplar for my bass though, but I'd still use basswood to give the lows, maybe just to offset a maple top.

    Maybe we got a strange pieces of poplar/basswood?

    Can anyone share their experiences on the comparable tones of these two woods?
     
  18. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Finish has a lot to do with how the wood performs. A heavy poly coat can stifle whatever the wood has to offer. A lighter coat can make it sound better than just an oil coat, and other scenarios.

    Also, you can take two pieces of the same specie of wood and if one weighs significantly different than the other, even though they're exactly the same dimensions, they will sound different. How was the wood dried, is it abnormally oily/dry, etc???
     
  19. I.'.I.'.Nakoa

    I.'.I.'.Nakoa Guest

    Aug 10, 2000
    Fort Worth.
    im not sure what the older ones were made of, i have the older one also, vol, vol, tone. i love this bass, maybe its just this one, but i havent found a bass that i like much better, yet.