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What's the actual use of a...

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Acacia, Jul 31, 2000.


  1. Acacia

    Acacia

    Apr 26, 2000
    Austin, TX

    a pre-amp? Do you use it for eq before actually running thru the head?
     
  2. phunky345

    phunky345

    Jun 20, 2000
    Missoula, MT
    I think it's so you can have the tone of a really expensive amp, but have a different kind of power amp. or so you can get whatever kind of power amp you want, if the amps that made the pre-amp don't offer enough wattage. that's my best guess...
    kyle
     
  3. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    In most cases, a separate pre-amp is the same thing as a head, only without the built-in power amp. So one would customarily get the desired tone by settings on the pre-amp, and run the output through a separate power amp, then to the speakers. An example would be an Eden WP-100 Navigator pre-amp which could then be run through the desired power amp, either solid-state, tube, or hybrid. This is one way to get the tone of a particular brand of amp you like, with the possibility of running it through a 3,000-watt power amp, then to your Carvin 12-inch speaker. (Can I watch, please?).
     
    BassikLee likes this.
  4. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Consistency over the course of 16 years.
     
  5. beans-on-toast

    beans-on-toast Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2008

    Zombie threads have a way of coming back from the dead. :laugh:

    ______________


    Something a lot of people don't realize, the term pre-amp is an abbreviation for preliminary amplifier. It conditions, amplifies, and in some cases, applies specific equalization to the signal from the instrument prior to passing it on to what is called the power amplifier. The power amplifier takes this low level signal and amplifies it enough to drive a speaker system. Ideally, any amplifier takes what is presented to it and linearly scales the voltage and current up proportionally. This is rarely the case with musical instrument amplifiers, non-linearities are always introduced that changes the signal. The degree of non-linearity changes with how hard the amplifier is driven. The speakers also contribute to how the sound is reproduced.

    This character is what players like.
     
    One Drop and Munjibunga like this.
  6. BadExample

    BadExample

    Jan 21, 2016
    This one is a bit unique, in that the final poster to the thread revived the zombie. First I recall here. You go @Munjibunga !!!

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Nothing is "a bit" unique. Something is either unique or not. There are no degrees of uniqueness - it's binary.
     
  8. BadExample

    BadExample

    Jan 21, 2016
    OK, it's very unique :laugh:;):thumbsup:
     
  9. One Drop

    One Drop Supporting Member

    Oct 10, 2004
    Swiss Alps
    That's a fairly unequivocal statement, isn't it?
     
    Passinwind and Munjibunga like this.
  10. BassmanPaul

    BassmanPaul Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 25, 2007
    Toronto Ontario Canada
    Especially since the OP was last seen on May 28 2010!