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Whats the difference..?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by big daddy cool, Sep 1, 2001.


  1. Flat wound and round wound.

    Whats the real difference? Im a complete novice, so tell me everything i could possably want to know about them.

    And also, i own a Gsr-200 with roundwound fender strings, it sounds and plays lovely, but any suggestions on what strings to buy next time would be great, because i just bought these ones preying they were good based on fender the name, luckly they were good, but if u know ones that are better, please do say.
     
  2. Bass Guitar

    Bass Guitar Supporting Member

    Aug 13, 2001
    Answer taken from the Bass Guitar FAQ from stagepass.com:

    http://www.stagepass.com/faqbass.html

    "A. There are two main types of strings, roundwound and flatwound. The roundwound type is most commonly used now, whereas the flatwound was more popular in the Motown era. All wound strings are made by holding one strand of wire straight and then wrapping one or more layers of additional wire around that "core" wire. Roundwound strings use a round wire as the wrap, while flatwound strings are wound with a flat ribbon wire. Roundwound strings provide a much brighter sound but also emphasize squeaks. Flatwound strings have a duller sound, but don't have as much extraneous noise. Roundwound strings tend to lose their brightness after some period of time, but may be rejuvenated by boiling in vinegar or detergent solutions or soaking in alcohol. Flatwound strings tend to maintain a more constant tone. James Jamerson used flatwound strings on his Precision Bass and is said to have only changed strings if he broke one. There are also some variations on these two types, such as the pressurewound strings which have the round wrap wire slightly flattened as it is wrapped around the core. In addition, some manufacturers freeze their strings, which is supposed to add to the string's brightness and/or longevity. One manufacturer is even black-anodizing their strings!"

    Hope this clarifies it! :)