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Whats up on the bag end ELF?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by ThunderStik, Aug 15, 2001.


  1. ThunderStik

    ThunderStik Guest

    Jun 25, 2001
    Claremore OK.
    Has anybody tried it?
     
  2. Nightbass

    Nightbass

    May 1, 2001
    Seattle, WA
    Yes, I've played with them a few times, using the 1x18 and 2x12 cabs. Totally incredible, but it can be "too much" low end. I get seasick whenever I use them. Must be great for all the super bass-heavy music, though.

    If you have the money, there's no better way to get clean and loud lows. You'll need the M/M1/M2 integrator unit and a suitable power amp to drive the special Bag End ELF cabs.

    Most of the people I know who use ELF use it to make a rig that is small, portable, and capable of handling low-B. For example, a small ELF cab paired up with any regular cab makes a stack that is exceptionally full range. The rack would consist of your preamp, the ELF integrator, and a power amp. One channel of the power amp is for your regular cab, and the other for your ELF.

    Stacks like an ELF 1x18 and a regular Bag End 2x10 or 4x10 are positively killer. Check out this article:

    http://www.primenet.com/~mldbass/musicianarticle.html

    Great gear, but it ain't cheap.

    Nightbass
     
  3. VicDamone

    VicDamone

    Jun 25, 2000
    Nightbass' disscription of the ELF is spot on. Yes, they can make you sick. I own a an ELF-M, !-!8", 2-10", QSC 2402 and usually have the sub channel turned down at the amp. The sub wants 400W @ 8 ohms.

    This system does very little above 80Hz (or around C on the A string), but below that there's alot going on even with a four stringed instrument.

    Yes, it's pricey but like a quality power amp you'll proably use it the rest of your life. Check out Myer Sound they have a powered 2-10" sub that I was hopeing someone here would buy and review. I think Warwick also has a powered sub.
     
  4. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
    If the ELF goes between the Preamp and amp, I suppose you could run it through the effects loop? :confused:
     
  5. ThunderStik

    ThunderStik Guest

    Jun 25, 2001
    Claremore OK.
    What is the cost of a simple system, 2-10 and 1-15
    with an itegrator? Which module do you need or will either of the three work?
     
  6. VicDamone

    VicDamone

    Jun 25, 2000
    The Intergrater or ELF-M processor starts at $850-1000 and up to the ELF-1 at $2000. Along with a deadicated amplifier/channel are used with E or ELF speakers only.

    All three processors drive the system. the M drives one speaker, the M2 drives two, and the 1 drives two and has more sophisticated controls as well as extending the response from 18Hz down to 8Hz.

    $1200-1500 pluse an amp/channel 400w@8 ohms.
     
  7. The ELF is an outstanding piece of engineering... but... other than Mr. Turner :D the rest of us hang out at 31 Hz and higher, so I have to ask if this very expensive response to 8 Hz is worth the expense to most bassists.

    I'm a die hard for response to 31 Hz, but I wonder the big bux spent on the ELF might be better spent on subs that make more noise down to 31 Hz.
     
  8. Nightbass

    Nightbass

    May 1, 2001
    Seattle, WA
    It's not that expensive, man. The least expensive ELF integrator, the M, is the one to use for bass guitar. The response is flat (flat, Bruce, flat!) :) to 18Hz. They cost about $800, and you can get a used one for $600.

    Only the higher-priced models do the 8 Hz thing. The more you pay, the more features you get. Any of the 3 will work, but the M is designed for musicians in particular.

    The cabs are not any more expensive than the regular Bag Ends. BassNW has had some used ones in the past, ranging from $400 for a 1x18 to $450 or $500 for the 2x12. So for a grand you can have a sub that is FLAT to 18Hz. That means it is also flat to 31Hz.

    ELFs are also louder than conventional subs, and don't roll off at all. They come in 1x10, 2x10, 1x12, 2x12, 1x18, and 2x18. Sorry, no 15's.

    And the biggest advantage is the small size.

    As for the signal chain, you run your signal into the ELF rack unit, and the output of the ELF goes to the power amp. You can feed your other amp/preamp from the back of the ELF, or vice versa. ELF doesn't go into the effects loop, tho.

    Of course, conventional subs can be cheaper, but what models exist that are the same size as a regular bass cab, weigh no more than 100 lbs., and are -3dB to 30 Hz? Can anyone think of any?

    Nightbass
     
  9. ThunderStik

    ThunderStik Guest

    Jun 25, 2001
    Claremore OK.
    Thats very interesting, kinda makes you think!
     
  10. VicDamone

    VicDamone

    Jun 25, 2000
    I understand questioning the need for a subwoofer system. Of course you don't really need one to reproduce down to 31Hz. Many cabinets produce output at that frequency although many begin to roll off well before that frequency.

    Since I've been using a sub my right hand attack on th A, E, and B strings has lightened up dramaticly. This lighter attack seems to produce a more complex or fuller tone with either equal to or more volume than the rest of the fingerboard, depending on where the sub gain is set. No, I don't really need it, in fact the extra cabinet trip is a real bear on some jobs and is sometimes left behind.

    I was unable to audition my sub before I purchased it as are most people here so I'm simply trying to convey my positive experience with the ELF system. I don't have a clue as to how a sub system would sound in a loud stage situation and so it may not be for everyone.
     
  11. electricmanny

    electricmanny

    Mar 28, 2013
    I was using the extra line out on a voodoo amp selector, only lows came out. which I prefer since I use so many effects

    I tried it your way, now I get the lows w/ all effects. I guess theres several different ways to do it. Line out doesnt work well at all