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When fingering chords like this

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by HGS, Apr 19, 2010.


?

Poll closed Apr 30, 2010.
  1. Index and ring

    17 vote(s)
    37.8%
  2. Index and pinky

    24 vote(s)
    53.3%
  3. other

    4 vote(s)
    8.9%
  1. HGS

    HGS

    Mar 31, 2010
    USA
    G-----------
    D-3-5-7-9-
    A-1-3-5-7-
    E-----------

    Which fingers do you use?
     
  2. grifff

    grifff

    Jan 5, 2009
    Towson, Maryland
    What?

    Are those numbers referring to intervals, frets or something else?

    EDIT: Do you mean power chords?
     
  3. MRDOOM

    MRDOOM

    Jul 16, 2009
    Utah
    Unless im very high up on the fretboard, I usually play chords made up by a root and a fifth with my index and pinky
     
  4. Thunder Pulse

    Thunder Pulse

    May 12, 2007
    There's no correct way of doing it. We all have different size hands. Just do whatever works best for you.
     
  5. One of my friends showed me how to play a "chord" with the root on the E string and the octive of the third on the G string. I haven't figured out which are the best fingers for me to use, but I love the sound.
     
  6. Minotauros

    Minotauros

    Nov 23, 2009
    I'd take it as frets. Fret 1 on the A string, fret 3 on the D string. They are also power chords: A#5, C5, D5, E5, root and 3rd. Though whether he realizes that or not only he can answer that. ;)

    ^This. On guitar I can use index and ring; on bass I need to use index and pinky. I have normal size hands, but short fingers.
     
  7. These are tenths (they're an interval, not a chord)....I love using em to end a song or to fill up space during a quieter part of a song.
    I personally use my index on the lower note and my middle for the upper note.
    Sometimes I cheat and use my thumb for the low note tho....:ninja:
     
  8. TheBasicBassist

    TheBasicBassist

    Jan 8, 2009
    Newark, DE
    Endorsing Artist: Rosado Guitars
    They are in fact chords, they're called dyads: chords made up of two notes.
     
  9. :rollno: ??? notes made up of two chords ??? :rollno:
     
  10. TheBasicBassist

    TheBasicBassist

    Jan 8, 2009
    Newark, DE
    Endorsing Artist: Rosado Guitars
    Fixed..
    It's still a little early over here and I didn't get too much sleep.
    :p
     
  11. St Drogo

    St Drogo

    Oct 9, 2009
    Netherlands
    Hehehe... "fingering"...
     
  12. Barry Clark

    Barry Clark

    May 9, 2007
    I am guessing those are R-5 bitonal chords.

    I try to use index ring in those scenarios but I will honestly use what ever is more immediately at hand and that could be mean middle and pinky or ring and pinky too.
     
  13. sonuvagun....
    was always taught that 2 notes are intervals, 3+ notes are chords. It kind of seems it could be looked at either way:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyad_%28music%29
    and at the same time:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_%28music%29

    :meh:

    Not sure about that one. Can we get any kind of clarification on this? Which intervals can be considered chords? It only cites a fifth as being a dyad in the wiki article.
     
  14. KimblesNimble

    KimblesNimble

    Jan 10, 2008
    two notes together is a chord, regardless if it lacks a 5th, 7th, 3rd etc. i.e shell voicings. and
    `I am guessing those are R-5 bitonal chords`

    Never heard that term I think it means the same thing.
     
  15. Febs

    Febs Supporting Member

    May 7, 2007
    Philadelphia, PA
    In my experience, the term "shell voicing" is usually used to refer to a chord containing the root, 3rd and 7th.
     
  16. Minotauros

    Minotauros

    Nov 23, 2009
  17. KimblesNimble

    KimblesNimble

    Jan 10, 2008
    sorry that's what I meant but it did not come out that way, but using only 3rd and 7ths usually - two notes.
     
  18. adding to the confusion, taken from this article:

    "Theorists are divided on whether a power chord can be considered a chord in the traditional sense, with some requiring a 'chord' to contain a minimum of three degrees of the scale."

    Not that wikipedia is the be-all end-all authority on anything. :D
     
  19. Minotauros

    Minotauros

    Nov 23, 2009
    True, on both counts.

    [whispering] psst... I figured it would throw in more confusion... shhh... :p
     
  20. ric stave

    ric stave

    May 6, 2006
    Buffalo, NY
    Playing 2 notes at the same time is also called 'double stops'... but that's more a technique term than a theory one.
     

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