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When is time to drop the GAS?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Dr. Cheese, Mar 30, 2009.


  1. I think you hit the nail on the head there.
    I'm in a similar situation. I love the basses I have, my amp is fine, I have an infant son and there are plenty of better things to do with any disposable income I might have. Pretty much killed my G.A.S.
     
  2. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    Another thing to think about is one's spouse. Even if one can afford more stuff, how your spouse sees more gear has a major impact. As I said before, just acknowledging that I am a collector, instead of someone who has deep musical reasons for wanting different basses helps me to control GAS. Secondly, I know that I just don't time to really be able to play more than three basses with any real regularity.
     
  3. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    2 kids, horseback riding and music lessons, violin rental, wife needs a new dress. Finish the trim in the house!

    All that, plus I've discovered that when I was happiest as a player I had ONE bass. It was my bass, I related to it, identified with it. Now I have two, 'cause you need backup if you gig, etc. Other players have more stuff? So? I can play, and that's all I need to know. My basses sound nice, I can get what I need or want to out of them.

    Amps are amps, get one that works and is loud enough. Cabs... light enough to carry, sounds good, handles the amp.

    Said too much already!
     
  4. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    The fact that so many iconic players have used one bass most of the time should not be lost on GAS-sy people like me. I know I will never be Marcus, but it makes a whole lot of sense to settle down a main bass and stick with it. That is what I have done with my Jazz.:)
     
  5. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    I always think of Jaco and his well-worn working axe... Jack Bruce had an EB-0, then a Dan Armstrong, then a... yep, I can relate to your line of thinking, Doc.
     
  6. Mikio

    Mikio

    Feb 21, 2009
    Santiago de Chile
    oh, one thing I learned not too long ago is that one usually gets used to A tone from A bass, and almost never changes it... at least that was my case, when I started playing more with new EQs and sounds from my old bass my GAS had really, if not stopped, diminished, but my Geddy was already in it's way, so I got it anyway lol xD
     
  7. GM60466

    GM60466

    May 20, 2006
    Land of Lakland
    N E V E R!!!!!

    G
     
  8. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    Another good example of a great player who has stayed with one bass is Hadrien Feraud. His main bass is a Ken Smith Burner five. That bass is the equivalent of a G&L Tribute or Lakland Skyline, and he has turned the Jazz World upside down with it.:eek:

    On the flipside, monster players like Anthony Jackson (maybe the greatest,) Lee Sklar, and Nathan East, have been through several basses over the years, and they consistently sound great. The catch is except of AJ, I don't think any of them have the kind of identifiable sound that the one main bass player types have.
     
  9. Good for you - sounds like you're set gear-wise. Time to start a legacy for your kids. Put some money aside for them, and earmark it for their musical whims once they're old enough to appreciate it. Your sacrifice now, but continuing the tradition of music with your children for the next generation to enjoy.
     
  10. I'm still addcited to TB but the GAS has gone (for now!)

    It wasn't really concious, but I just found eventually that any other bass isn't going to make a lot of difference now that I'm happy with what I've got. The GAS energy is now directed to making myself play and sound as good as I can.

    Oh - and the GAS-ending bass? A MIM 50s Precision. Some things just never go out of style.
     
  11. JPrinos

    JPrinos

    May 16, 2008
    Toronto, Canada
    I'm intrigued. What is this GAS thing you speak of?
     
  12. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    Gear Aquisition Syndrome
     
  13. JPrinos

    JPrinos

    May 16, 2008
    Toronto, Canada
    Ahhhh..

    I have it BAD!!

     
  14. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    At the end of the day, GAS, for me at least, is like diabetes or high blood pressure. It is a managable disease that cannot be taken granted because untreated, it can be quite dangerous.;)
     
  15. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    DR Strings
    You know, I've never thought that was relevant. Marcus has used more than one bass over the years and for the work people really know him for...

    he has someone else holding down alot of the bass work. We don't have that in common.
    :D

    So many iconic players remain in the confines of their own notoriety... I'm glad I don't have that "problem".
    ;)

    This is not to diminish Marcus' point but when people see Marcus they want to see what they expect. If he shows up with something other than his Fenders (BTW you do know he has more than one Fender that he gigs with, right? And he has used a non-Fender fretless), people might be disappointed.

    I do believe you should learn to play first but the idea that you'd be better off sticking to one bass when the people giving that adivce don't even do it just doesn't ring true for me as some people interpret it. Here's what I think he meant: quit making excuses, pick a bass and learn how to play.

    Many musicians love to blame their gear for their musical shortcomings and are on a neverending search for that instrument that makes them better... in spite of their lack of commitment, current abilities, etc. Get a decent bass and learn to play it. Quit blaming everything but the one factor that's usually at the root of any lack of growth.

    The same with Stanley and a myriad of other players... sure they can get away with playing a four string...because that's all their gig requires. And Stanley had so many basses that he's the perfect counterpoint to Marcus' point. On four strings.

    Playing more than one bass, at least in my case, is just plain fun. I doubt I'll see Vic doing a coffee house set backing a poet or up early Sunday covering an Israel & the New Breed cut so yeah, the four string he uses is fine for the limited work that he does. And I don't mean limited as any sort of negative. He does Vic.

    This does not mean I couldn't do every gig I have with a Teisco del Ray... but since I don't have to and as I said before alot of my gear ultimately is free... why not indulge myself?

    I have spent the time learning how to play and I'm still improving even though it seems like I've been playing forever. I like playing great instruments, regardless of brand or price, that inspire me to play because they let me be the weak link.

    If it's something I like to do AND I can figure out a way to do it that's not detrimental (heck, it's usually beneficial financially) to my family and it's future, I honestly don't see the problem.

    The keys are as I laid them out and one huge thing I forgot to mention was priorities. Since you can't do everything, choose what's really important to you and do the things you love. I love being a musician so this dovetails nicely with that. I'd like to get into other things but I can't because I know I can't do everything I'd like to do.
     
  16. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    DR Strings
    Hadrien still uses his Burner but did he stop using his other basses? He does have other ones.
     
  17. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    DR Strings
    There weren't as many choices available then. Just saying.

    It's like talking about a great grandparent who was fine with a Black Model T.
     
  18. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    DR Strings
    If you set expectations going into the relationship...
    :D

    I was a musician when I met my future wife. I didn't have as much gear but let me dust this story off...

    my wife and I went to a yard sale one weekend several years ago. I found a 1970's SVT rig in excellent condition for $150. I told her I was going to buy it and she asked why would I want that big thing. I explained I didn't want it to play it, it was worth far more than I was paying for it and I'd likely have it for less than a week.

    I put it on consignment at a local store on Monday and it was sold before the end of the week for more than four times what I paid for it. My end was $600.

    The reason why I was able to do this was that I had taken the time to really know the market for my instrument. If you don't know, it's hard to know a deal when you see one. My wife knows I know the market and in fact she has since become an even more active bargain hunter than me. Beats paying retail;)
     
  19. I too like this topic, and I will give (and this may be a first for us) every point you make above a +1:D
     
  20. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    DR Strings
    Nah, we agree more often than you know. We just spend more time talking about the stuff we disagree about.
    :smug:
     

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