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When is time to drop the GAS?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Dr. Cheese, Mar 30, 2009.


  1. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    I don't know about the Model T comment, some of those old designa are still valid in our modern musical world. You can still go 90 with an old bass.

    Anyway, I do carpentry for a daytime job, and frankly musical opportunities don't seem quite as numerous as they were a number of years ago. Family life brings a new immediacy and creates int's own sort of space... so for me there are too many choices. For me to spend any more time (I've spent some) looking at other 'possibilities' for tone, look, etc. is a waste, and time spent in "The Land of Make-Believe" instead of playing music.

    I'd rather make the most of the nice axes I have and get on with it. I'm at where I'm at, and I'm alright.

    Besides, I've got new little budding musical careers to foster. :cool:
     
  2. sflajimmy

    sflajimmy

    Nov 6, 2005
    South Florida
    Ha, ha I've said that before...Credit card bills are one good cure. I won't buy anything unless I sell something to cover the cost, these days. I also look at the reality of how much I play and my needs vs my playing level. I have equipment that far exceeds my playing level and that's my choice and it's subjective for sure. Only you can answer that question. Still I look at the classifieds everyday.....:)
     
  3. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    DR Strings
    It goes to people talking about the choices others made when there weren't as many choices. If a Model T is all you could get, it's not like it's some noble thing to choose one.
    :)

    Everyone's situation is different. I decided to play locally because I have a family. And I already fostered a budding musical career by setting an example of how it could be done while maintaining a family. My son's 25 and well on his way in music and another field.
    :cool:
     
  4. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    Brad, I think the great majority of us understand that Marcus and Hadrien have more than one bass. My point was that these two phenomenal bassists really created an identity for themselves on a particular bass. I also happen to think that it is a good idea to develop an identity on a particular bass although one's identity will come through whether one uses one bass most of the time like Marcus Miller or many basses like Lee Sklar.

    I also agree 100% that serious study is the most important thing. Personally, I plan to seriously devote more time to study the next time I take professional sabatical since that will allow me a clear block of time to be a student again.

    Finally, we all are different. I am at a point in my life where building up my collection won't help me execute my vision any better, and could actually get in the way of what I need to do, which is to practice and play out more. I know what I need to do for me, and I am carrying out my plan. :bassist:
     

  5. +1 to this also:)
     
  6. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    To paraphrase the united front of Brad and Ken, GAS has gone on to long when it becomes an excuse for not putting in the work on the bass to become a better player.

    I think I have been convicted.:bag:
     
  7. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    DR Strings
    I know they created identities with one bass... what I don't see is the correlation to everyone else.

    They're first and foremost solo artists. What does that have to do with most other bassists?

    That's my point. Pointing to choices solo artists made has next to nothing to do with most of us who play a far more traditional rhythym section role on the instrument.

    And even in the context of solo artists, they typically played what they could afford at the time. In some, maybe many cases, when they had access to other basses... they used them.

    I don't see the importance of developing a relationship with one bass unless that's all you can handle. No, I don't mean that in a bad way. I'm saying that I have several basses I know intimately, that I have particular ways to do things that I do that I don't even think about... I just do them. Bottom line, it's the same principle... with more basses.
    :cool:
     
  8. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    DR Strings
    I'm the beneficiary, to an almost paranormal degree, of the neverending hunt for "the this will make up for all the time I didn't spend in the shed" bass. Yet I will point out the folly in that hunt because it may save someone some time and effort wasted in the wrong pursuit... finding gear vs. finding light at the end of their musical tunnel.

    I love to play. I love to practice (no, not band practice:eyebrow: ). I genuinely look forward to picking up a bass and playing it whenever I can. Sometimes you can find time where you didn't think you had it. Sometimes there is no time. It's all about how bad you want it. I'm addicted to music. It's a good thing.
     
  9. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    Brad, I disagree. When I think of Marcus, the first thing that comes to my mind is the work he did with Luther Vandross and david Sanborn back in the eighties, and his work with Miles Davis. On all of those gigs, he was playing wicked thumpin' basslines, not melodies and solos. Whenever I slap a bass, I am channeling Marcus Miller and Larry Graham even if I sound like crap doing it.;)
     
  10. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    DR Strings
    And if you noticed the other players at the time, several of them had the same sound. For instance, did you like his work with Tom Browne?
    :bag:

    I'm talking about how most people seem to know Marcus now. Nowadays these guys are first and foremost solo artists.

    There's nothing wrong with channeling him or Graham... I have several other bassists in addition to Graham who influenced me slap wise. Not that I sound like any of them. For the Marcus sound, the bass influenced me more. It's hard to not get a later 70's Ash Jazz to sound like that IME.
    ;)
     
  11. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    The funny thing about Tom Browne is that I know Marcus played on Jamaica Funk, but the bass is pretty much covered by synth bass. The bassline from Tom Browne I remember the most is Thighs High, and I think that was Sekou Bunch.

    I know the seventies jazz was the thing, but I still think Marcus was my favorite of that bunch.:bassist:
     
  12. akaTRENT

    akaTRENT

    Jan 10, 2009
    New Jersey
    Recession.
     
  13. BillySid

    BillySid Gold Supporting Member

    Nov 11, 2005
    Weatherford, TX
    I'll 2nd that. Hard economic times equals no money for gear besides what I got.
     
  14. If you regular TB - you're making it next to impossible to quit getting GAS. Seeing other people aquire new basses makes you think "hmmm - a new bass would be cool". It's kind of like an alcoholic constantly going into the liquor store for a look around - I mean sooner or later ..... you know the rest :help: :cool: :D
     
  15. I've been reading this thread with increasing interest. There are several philosophical levels being mined at the same time (excuse me, I'm an English teacher); committment vs lust, devotion vs economy, values vs pleasure--I love it! Dr. Cheese should be voted philosopher in chief of TB, and I mean this with sincerity and respect for ALL of his intelligent and soul-searching posts. This is why I come here.
     
  16. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    Why thank you! I should list my TB posts as research for when I seek promotion to full professor.:D
     
  17. ljazz

    ljazz

    Dec 10, 2002
    Cookeville, TN
    I've found over the years the basses I keep or sell is dependent on how they stand up or compliment the two I've owned the longest. And I find the biggest things that go towards that is playability, adjustability and finally tone. If a bass is finicky to climate changes, a bear to set up, or sounds like a good ol' P or J, it usually doesn't stick around long.

    Now, as I get older, I find justification to satisfy some pangs of GAS in that for a long time I struggled to not just get new stuff, but to actually keep what I had, while today I make enough to buy a little something every now and then. Of course, the key is to keep the gear moving, and keeping the stuff that moves you. And if you buy smart, you can at least break even over the long haul. GAS is only a problem if the gear piles up unused.

    Ljazz
     
  18. bottomzone

    bottomzone

    Oct 21, 2005
    As long as one has financial resources and justification, a cure is difficult to come by.



    A Groove is a Terrible Thing to Waste! :cool:
     
  19. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    Noble or no, a couple basses is enough for the Count. The guys I mentioned were my mentors (and JP Jones!), so I was influenced by what I saw and heard. When I was a young player all I wanted was to play- make the sound! I didn't tend to waste much time wanting other axes, except a Rickenbacker... That's still me. Okay- it's me all over again!

    I learned that John Paul-Jones played many basses, not just the Jazz, but he still always sounded like himself.

    Now that I'm older (and more of a wise-ass), there are more sounds I hear closely- but I still tend to attribute a sound to the player more than to the bass. Am I wrong? No, just stubborn. And probably right. :) And I find too much stuff distracting.

    If I played as my only living, I'd probably have a small quiver- my carpentry toolbox is pretty sizeable now.
     
  20. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    DR Strings
    I was just talking about this with a friend of mine and we were trying to remember all of the guys with similar tone. Several came to mind and many were on the scene and prominent before Marcus. Marcus prevailed.
    :D

    BTW Marcus is playing a rhythm guitar part on Jamaica Funk. The bass part is all Bernard Wright. Either way, there was no Marcus signature sound in that song. I had to go back and listen just to double check.
    :cool:
     

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