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When you cut corners..

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by Cody Sisk, Apr 19, 2010.


  1. Cody Sisk

    Cody Sisk

    Jan 26, 2009
    Lilburn, GA
    Ronald Sachs Violins
    Here comes a rant!!:mad::mad:

    If this post keeps ONE person from buying junk basses off the internet or "Ma n Pa" music shops without a clue, I'll be satisfied.

    You can't build a 3/4 size bass and put a 2x6 with routed corners in the bottom and expect it to be a suitable endblock. I now have proof of what can happen! A photo never lies!

    4535282740_2f902bbfdb. flickr

    The block is too narrow and if the seam pops as it did in this case, the inadequate width will put added pressure on the ribs and crack em like this..

    4535283064_a3808f02f2. flickr

    The top is staying on for this one. I'll glue everything up and hope for the best. This bass is a ticking time bomb. It's only a matter of time before the lower bouts and the endblock fail again.

    Cost of the bass- I guess less than $1000
    Cost of initial repair- maybe $150
    Cost of taking the top off, replacing the end block, repairing future rib damage- $1500 plus
    Cost of educating the customer that they shouldn't have cut corners and bought this junker in the first place- priceless..
     
  2. vejesse

    vejesse

    Apr 8, 2006
    Madison, Wi
    Double Bass Workshop
    What are the dimensions of the block?
     
  3. George700DL

    George700DL

    Jan 9, 2009
    Maryland
    Mine is made from 2 2x6's :), one rotated so the grains aren't parallel. And the bottom is curved, matching the ribs.

    George
     
  4. Cody Sisk

    Cody Sisk

    Jan 26, 2009
    Lilburn, GA
    Ronald Sachs Violins
    Maybe 4 inches wide, the ribs are 8 inches deep
     
  5. Gearhead43

    Gearhead43

    Nov 25, 2007
    NorCal
    What then constitutes a suitable endblock, if I may so humbly inquire?
     
  6. james condino

    james condino Spruce dork Supporting Member Commercial User

    Sep 30, 2007
    asheville, nc
     
  7. Cody Sisk

    Cody Sisk

    Jan 26, 2009
    Lilburn, GA
    Ronald Sachs Violins
    One that can't be carved from a single, standard cut timber for starters.. In this bass, a block with at least an inch more width on either side would work fine.
     
  8. Cody Sisk

    Cody Sisk

    Jan 26, 2009
    Lilburn, GA
    Ronald Sachs Violins
     
  9. George700DL

    George700DL

    Jan 9, 2009
    Maryland
    So laminated is the way to go? Sorry if that's a stupid question.

    The reason I laminated mine (like I mentioned, 2 pieces, grain at 90 degrees) was my concern about the block possibly splitting along the grain lines.

    George
     
  10. Cody Sisk

    Cody Sisk

    Jan 26, 2009
    Lilburn, GA
    Ronald Sachs Violins
    George I think your two-piece block should hold up way better than the one I'm dealing with here. The only thing that worries me about the 90° angle is that the end grain doesn't touch the top and the back. I would be concerned about the block shrinking and separating..

    I like to do my blocks at a 45-60° grain angle so that end grain still touches the top and back, but is not parallel with the grain of the top/back.
     
  11. George700DL

    George700DL

    Jan 9, 2009
    Maryland
    I thought of that as well when I made it:) That part does not touch the plates - it's about 1/2" shy on both top and bottom - I'm referring to the part further from the endpin. It's merely there to thicken up the block (extra support for the endpin socket),and to prevent the block splitting. The combined thickness is around 2 inches, if I remember correctly.

    George
     
  12. it's routine cody...
    even when the endblock is sufficient in size the quick glue process on green wood fails and the result is the same. it's even more prevalent with cellos. button it back up, and inform your customer of its' weak links.
    call it job security ;)
     

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