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Where can i find scales?

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Phunky, Oct 10, 2004.


  1. Phunky

    Phunky Guest

    Aug 1, 2004
    Sweden
    Where on the internet can i find scales? It would be a plus if it's in swedish! :)
     
  2. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
  3. Swedish Scales can be found on Swedish Fish, OF COURSE! :D

    Go here: http://www.famousfoods.com/c-swed.html

    Also, Veruca Salt sang a song about Swedish Fish:

    "Swedish Fish"

    Green or red, good night, remember
    Green is best, of all the flavours
    go ahead it's only water
    I love my swedish fish [x3]
    he's my secret wish
    talk to me, I need attention
    tell me all of your confessions
    tell me if I cease to mention
    I love my swedish fish [x3]
    he's my pisces gift
    and I'm never coming back
    I am too far gone
    won't you be heading this way before too long
    im holding to you
    I love my swedish fish [x3]
    he's my secret wish
    I love my swedish fish [x3]
    he's my favourite gift

    Hope this helps (maybe a little, anyway... :D :D :D )
     
  4. Phunky

    Phunky Guest

    Aug 1, 2004
    Sweden
  5. Joe P

    Joe P

    Jul 15, 2004
    Milwaukee, WI
    Study them a little, Man.. See? the numbers are frets and the vertical lines are strings. The grey dot is the root of the scale, the blues are other notes for a one octave complete scale in that neck position - starting from the root. The whites are all the other places that notes in that scale come up. The 'single-string' one just shows the straight 'spacing' (intervals) from note to note, starting from the root (notice the top fret is not the nut in this case - it's just arbitrary, starting with the root).

    Thanks for those, Kiwi. I'm studying them!

    Joe

    (PS: where's my B-string?)
     
  6. Jazzin'

    Jazzin' ...Bluesin' and Funkin'

    EVERY SCALE IN THE WORLD!!!! theres no need for anyhting else, i use this all the time, it has all the names and plus theres chords too. but you have to be familiar with music.
     
  7. Joe P

    Joe P

    Jul 15, 2004
    Milwaukee, WI
    Not too much - you linked to the piano page; if you go to one of the two guitar pages, it shows you a regular neck-diagram.

    Nice!

    Thanks for the link!

    Joe
     
  8. Jazzin'

    Jazzin' ...Bluesin' and Funkin'

    i like to use the piano page, it actually plays the scale or chord so you can hear it. not too many??? theres like 400 different kinds of scales there.
     
  9. Joe P

    Joe P

    Jul 15, 2004
    Milwaukee, WI
    No - I didn't mean 'not too many chords'; I meant that you don't have to be that 'familiar with music', as you said, to use the site, if you use the guitar-neck version of the site.

    That place is cool, huh?!

    Joe
     
  10. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    Totally agree. Wish I had known about this excellent site long before now.
     
  11. Joe P

    Joe P

    Jul 15, 2004
    Milwaukee, WI
    Y'know - looking at those charts makes me think of how I've been more and more looking at (I mean picturing in my mind) scale patterns in groups of two and three positions, instead of being locked into one position and then having to 'switch gears' when I move my fretting hand to a different one. thinking that way is really giving me a more intuitive insight into harmonies; it's easy to picture thirds, fourths and fifths when you're thinking in terms of three scale position patterns at a time. Also I find myself (relatively) smoothly sliding notes up and down between the different positions more now. I sometimes even hammer a note on the same string that's sounding, but at a position higher up the neck, rather than conitinuing over a string or skipping a string for a higher note (that looks cool too...).

    "Oh, so he's just trying to impress people" - of course I am! I want to be a performer.

    Joe
     
  12. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    There are 3 basic patterns in the Diatonic Major scale:
    -Whole-tone Whole-tone
    -Whole-tone half-tone
    -Half-tone Whole-tone

    A Selection Of Chords And Complementary Scales

    C major - Ionian, Lydian
    C minor - Aeolian, Dorian, Phrygain
    C sus 4 - Ionian, Mixolydian
    C major 6 - Ionian, Lydian
    C minor 6 - Dorian
    C 7 - Mixolydian, Locrian
    C major 7 - Ionian, Lydian
    C minor 7 - Aeolian, Dorian
    C minor 7 b5 - Locrian
    C 9 - Mixolydian

    Source: Scales and Modes for Guitar by Cliff Douse