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Where can I learn the eight bar boogie?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by TeenBassPlayer, Jun 20, 2003.


  1. TeenBassPlayer

    TeenBassPlayer

    Jun 19, 2003
    Hey, I've just started playing bass. My dad played it when he was a teenager and he said the most important scale for me to learn is the eight bar boogy. The problem is; I can't find anywhere on the net that shows me how to do it. Do any of you guys know any sites where I can learn this scale?
     
  2. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    There's no such scale. It's (maybe) a song forum) - like a blues, which usually is a 12-bar form, with a I-IV-V chord progression.

    You should start out with a book on basic music theory:

    Frank Haunschild's The New Harmony Book is a great primer.

    You can find it on www.amazon.com
     
  3. TeenBassPlayer

    TeenBassPlayer

    Jun 19, 2003
    Hmmm. My dad did say it was some form of blues scale.
     
  4. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    Scale? I wonder if he means something like variations of a 1 - 3 - 5 - 6 - 8 - 6 - 5 - 3 riff (eg. in the key of A, that's A C# E F# A' F# E C#, played in eighth notes across one bar).

    It's not a scale as such, just certain key notes picked out of the scale to form a one bar, eight note riff. The reason I'm thinking this is that this riff (and variations on the form) is the basis of a whole bunch of songs.

    It's not the whole picture by a long shot, but if you're new to the instrument, there are worse things you could learn.

    Wulf
     
  5. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    OK, so it's a blues scale you're after.
    But since your dad is talking about bars, it's clear he's talking about a song form or chord changes.

    There are several "blues scales".

    minor pentatonic

    minor pentatonic with a b5 (minor blues scale)

    in boogie woogies the mixolydian scale is often used.
     
  6. TeenBassPlayer

    TeenBassPlayer

    Jun 19, 2003
    Yeah. He told me that if I learn the blues I can learn anything so you're probaly right. Maybe if I'm lucky he'll remeber it (highly unlikely though).
     
  7. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
  8. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Here's a BASIC 8-Bar Boogie using quarter notes on the bass-
    Basically, a I-IV-V7-I pattern

    /G-B-C-D-/G-B-C-D-/
    /C-E-F-G-/C-E-F-G-/
    /D-F#-G-A-/D-F#-G-A-/
    /G-B-C-D-/G-B-C-D-/

    Repeat

    Or, you can stretch each riff over 2 bars-

    /G-B-D-E-/F-E-D-B-/
    /C-E-G-A-/Bb-A-G-E-/
    /D-F#-A-B-/C-B-A-F#-/
    /G-B-D-E-/F-E-D-B-/
     
  9. What we're describing sounds like what my mother always used to play on the piano when we wanted to have some fun. I now use it for a warm up on the bass. Hopefully I'm able to explain this accurately, but I believe I play it as follows: Starting on the eighth fret of the B string working my way up the E and A strings, I play G-B-D-E-F-E-D-B (1-3-5-6-7-6-5-3). I play this two times but when coming back down the 2nd time, I finish by playing ....F-E-D-C# (7-6-5-4). Then start the next set on C (eighth fret of E string) and play the same pattern two times ending on F# to start the third set on F (eighth fret of A string). I play the third set with two equal progressions, without half-stepping down at the end, then starting the entire thing over again on G of the B string. This could, of course, could be played in another key, but I just like starting it in G. I sometimes play this as 1-3-5-6-8-6-5-3 as Wulf described (it's a neat sound for a change), but it just isn't how "Mom" did it.