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Where to get neck blanks?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by JMaris, Jan 25, 2012.


  1. JMaris

    JMaris

    Mar 24, 2009
    Andrews, Tx
    Hey guys, I was wondering if anyone had a good source for a fairly inexpensive Ibanez bass neck blank?
     
  2. Root 5

    Root 5

    Nov 25, 2001
    Eh!
    Since you said "blank." I assume you want a piece of wood to shape your own neck?

    Go to your local lumber yard and ask for a piece of hard rock maple: preferably quarter-sawn that is 36" x 4" x 7/8" to 1"

    It might cost you $20 to $25.

    There are also places like Warmoth, Stewart MacDonald, Musikraft, and USA Custom Guitars. But you may pay more from these places.
     
  3. mikeyswood

    mikeyswood Banned

    Jul 22, 2007
    Cincinnati OH
    Luthier of Michael Wayne Instruments
    Flatsawn is better for necks. There is no science supporting quartersawn necks being either more stable or stronger.

    It's a myth; think for yourself.
     
  4. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Could this statment also be repeated, with the words "flatsawn" and "quartersawn" exchanged?
     
  5. xepher2792

    xepher2792

    Oct 7, 2011
    Ventura CA
    Quartersawn is better for necks. There is no science supporting flatsawn necks being either more stable or stronger.

    It's a myth; think for yourself.

    Yes Sir PJ
     
  6. Get two planks of wood and make a 5-piece neck! :D

    Someday I'm going to build one.
     
  7. Root 5

    Root 5

    Nov 25, 2001
    Eh!
    Are you kidding me? There absolutely is solid science supporting the fact that quarter-sawn necks are stronger.

    Many people mistakenly think quarter-sawn necks are "stiffer." They're not. But they are stronger.

    They're stronger because of the grain orientation in relation to the tension placed on the neck by the strings. Less stress is put on a QS neck so it's also more stable, long term. But you have to compare apples to apples; hard rock maple to hard rock maple, for example.

    Sound also travels faster and more efficiently through a quarter-sawn neck. It's been tested scientifically and it's a fact.
     
  8. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Really? Please show it.
    Ok.
    Really? Please show it.
    Nope. Or, please cite reliable sources. This makes no sense from the standpoint of engineering material mechanics.
    Absolutely not. The stresses are identical. I suggest that you may need a clearer understanding of strength, stiffness, stress, and strain.
    Really? Please show it. In fact don't bother, since even if it were true that it were stronger, that would have no relation to stability. Stability in this case being defined as decreased medium-term reaction to variation in ambient temperature and humidity.
    Nope. Wrong. Show me the proof. Speed of sound through a solid is proportional to the ratio of stiffness to density. Both boards have the same proportion of early and late woods, with their somewhat varying speed of sound. neither board has any mechanism to favor transmission preferentially through one set of layers.

    Also, re efficiently, if I make a guess at what you might mean by efficiency of transmission, there is neither theory not evidence to support a lower damping factor in a flat sawn board.
     
  9. Dave Higham

    Dave Higham

    Dec 19, 2005
    S.W.France
    Took the words right out of my mouth PJ. :)
     
  10. TannerManner

    TannerManner

    Feb 12, 2012
    What about warping not due to stress? Just how wood naturally moves. Plainsawn wood is much more prone to cupping than quartersawn.
     
  11. Beej

    Beej

    Feb 10, 2007
    Victoria, BC
    LOL, I always love full contact science. :D
     
  12. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Indeed, there are differences in the properties of wood according to its grain orientation, and therefore in its application also. But those differences claimed in that other post were not accurate.
     
  13. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    Thank you to xkcd:
    [​IMG]
     
  14. Root 5

    Root 5

    Nov 25, 2001
    Eh!
    Take two hard rock Maple neck blanks, one flat-sawn and the other perfectly quartered.

    Put pressure on both of them; pressure on the flat-sawn face of the flat-sawn neck and pressure on the quarter-sawn face of the quarter-sawn blank. You'll discover that the quarter-sawn neck blank will withstand many times more pressure than the flat-sawn blank before breaking.

    Quarter-sawn necks are absolutely stronger.
     
  15. mikeyswood

    mikeyswood Banned

    Jul 22, 2007
    Cincinnati OH
    Luthier of Michael Wayne Instruments

    Amazon.com: The Luthier's Handbook: A Guide to Building Great Tone in Acoustic Stringed Instruments (9780634014680): Roger H. Siminoff: Books

    Page 25, fellas.

    And if you do not believe this author, or myself, then recreate the test for yourselves.
     
  16. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Oh boy
    :rollno:
     
  17. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    1. Sources?
    2. Again, it doesn't matter what the strength is, since the stress never gets anywhere close to a yield point or ultimate strength and failure. Stiffness does matter. Do you have any data on differences in stiffness?
     
  18. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
  19. mikeyswood

    mikeyswood Banned

    Jul 22, 2007
    Cincinnati OH
    Luthier of Michael Wayne Instruments
    Sure. It's at the Northern shop so I'll grab it when I go there next.
     
  20. HaMMerHeD

    HaMMerHeD

    May 20, 2005
    Norman, OK, USA
    I'm curious to see it too.

    I'm with PJ. Given that most 4-string bass necks have between 100 and 140 pounds of tension pulling parallel with the grain, I find it highly unlikely that the fracturing point of the wood would ever be reached under normal circumstances. Thus, resisting flexion and torsion is more important in a neck than resisting fracture, since a fracture is extremely unlikely to ever occur without significant trauma (such as being dropped or stepped on).
     

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