Which bass guitar most defines the sound of the 60s?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by bassbourne, May 29, 2021.


  1. Ampslut

    Ampslut Supporting Member

    May 15, 2017
    Back in the 60's there were more p-basses being used than all other basses combined.
     
    bassbourne likes this.
  2. GretschWretch

    GretschWretch Supporting Member

    Dec 27, 2013
    East Central Alabama
    Okay; I stand corrected. But, dang it, that opening G to me sounds *just like* a Gretsch.
     
    Steve Boisen likes this.
  3. wiscoaster

    wiscoaster

    Mar 28, 2021
    Wisconsin
    None of the above. Sir Paul and his violin Hoffner.
     
    mikeswals, bassbourne and squarepeg like this.
  4. squarepeg

    squarepeg

    Dec 21, 2010
    Slovenia
    194556005_5534661276608803_1521857512925353006_n.png
     
  5. kevmac

    kevmac

    Mar 17, 2019
    Rhode Island
    I used to rush home from school to catch "Where the action is".I thought Paul Revere and the Raiders were the coolest and Fangs Vox Phantom was the most beautiful thing ever.It made me want a bass.Fang would flip the bass over and his name was on the back.I'm not quite sure but I seem to remember reading he put a Fender neck on it at some point.My first bass was a Vox Panther which I still have.A prized possession that is autographed by John Entwhistle.
     
    ac100X, wiscoaster and Steve Boisen like this.
  6. TomB

    TomB Supporting Member

    Aug 24, 2007
    Vermont
    Wow! A bright red Vox Panther was my second bass. It had the thinnest neck ever! Fang said he wasn’t real fond of his Phantom and did whatever he could to make it more Fender-like. But Vox was paying the bills, so… Somewhere here on TB, maybe even in this thread, is a link to contemporary interviews with both Mark Lindsay and “Fang” whose real name escapes me (it’s Phil something). The focus of the interviews was the musical talent of the Raiders, as displayed by a fairly recent reissue of not only their hits, but also a collection of more obscure B-sides on which they were offered much more musical freedom than the “Raiders” persona allowed. I hope to pick it up some time myself. I still recall the bass “solo” in Kicks as being a young bassist’s learning project :). I’m not sure that Phantom ever saw any studio time.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2021
  7. kevmac

    kevmac

    Mar 17, 2019
    Rhode Island
    They had some great b- sides.One that I really liked was "The great airplane" strike,it had a simple but cool baseline.They played a ton of bars before making it so they new how to play.I got a laugh out of the synchro dance steps they did.So 60s.
     
    TomB likes this.
  8. wiscoaster

    wiscoaster

    Mar 28, 2021
    Wisconsin
    Paul Revere and the Raiders were great performers and entertainers as well as musicians and not much remembered these days. And, I must say, also, that's one impressive autograph and a possession to be greatly treasured.
     
    kevmac likes this.
  9. GretschWretch

    GretschWretch Supporting Member

    Dec 27, 2013
    East Central Alabama
    Like the Vox Mark IV, the Phantom loses a lot of its beauty once you try to play it on your lap.
     
  10. ac100X

    ac100X

    Apr 6, 2003
    California
    Red and a Vox? It Loses the beauty? Not if the new replacement pick guard is engraved with "VOX Phantom IV" like the old one.
    IMG_2266 VOX Phantom.JPG
     
  11. TomB

    TomB Supporting Member

    Aug 24, 2007
    Vermont
    I think that red & white was the color scheme of my Panther as well. Nice!
     
  12. GretschWretch

    GretschWretch Supporting Member

    Dec 27, 2013
    East Central Alabama
    The name is Phil Volk. He either has or had some connection with Disney.
     
    TomB likes this.
  13. GretschWretch

    GretschWretch Supporting Member

    Dec 27, 2013
    East Central Alabama
    But how easy is it to play seated? That's my point. Color has nothing to do with it, although what you posted is a beauty.
     
  14. dabbler

    dabbler

    Aug 17, 2007
    Bowie, MD
    I appreciate your big picture view, and in truth different folks are going to answer according to their perspective.

    Here's mine: The Funk Brothers (Motown's studio band) recorded more number one hit songs than The Beach Boys, The Rolling Stones, Elvis, and The Beatles combined, using a Precision. Add in the wrecking crew who also did a lot of hits on a Precision and I have to give the Precision the nod.
     
  15. kevmac

    kevmac

    Mar 17, 2019
    Rhode Island
    Hence Phil Volk decided to put a Fender neck on his.Both he and Mark really trash the Vox gear they were given in their sponsorship after the sale to Thomas Organ.They actually put Macintosh power amps and Bogner preamps all tube inside the cabinets of their Super Beatles.And loaded them with Fender D-140 (I think) bass speakers.
    The Phantom still is one of the coolest looking basses imo.It is a shame on the playability issues.But anyone would look so rockin' roll just holding one on stage.Look at the price these command today however.
     
    Steve Boisen likes this.
  16. squarepeg

    squarepeg

    Dec 21, 2010
    Slovenia
    Screenshot 2021-06-18 at 06.57.24.png
     

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  17. Fender1980

    Fender1980

    Aug 11, 2010
    Agreed on the Motown P-Bass.

    On the "Dr. Licks" invented quote, on a purely "Apples To Apples" comparison, meaning "The Funk Brothers" or Quorum of "Funk Brothers" as a unit, did NOT record more #1 US Billboard Pop hits than the Beatles, Elvis, and Beach Boys combined. Count them up...it's just not true.

    If you start to count "Funk Brothers" #1s with individual #1s recorded by an individual Funk Brother (i.e - Bob Babbitt, James Jameson, Eddie Bongo Brown) you'd have to also include all the solo #1s by individual Beatles or Bruce Johnson doing a backing vocals on a #1 etc.

    Carry on.
     
  18. dabbler

    dabbler

    Aug 17, 2007
    Bowie, MD
    Hmm, I never counted them, but from Wikipedia:
    "Some combination of the members played on each of Motown's 100-plus U.S. R&B number one singles[1] and 50-plus U.S. Pop number ones released from 1961 and 1972."
     
  19. briandavismurph

    briandavismurph

    Jul 1, 2013
    Chicago
    always going to be a well worn Precision 1.75 pancake neck
     
  20. dave hope

    dave hope

    Dec 16, 2016
    My thought is based on production/sales, rather than sound, looks or who used what. But it seems to me that in 1959-60 (roughly), you had no Jazz basses on the market, but a decades worth of Precision sales.
    Knowing that it takes a few years for a new product/model to gain a good “word of mouth” reputation. The Jazz bass had some catching up to do in numbers and in reputation during the 60s. So between the two models, because of the lopsided volume of instruments on the market.
    I would have to say the Precision during the 60s
     
    J R Knots likes this.
  21. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jul 26, 2021

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