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Which glue should I use?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by daveman, May 21, 2016.


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  1. daveman

    daveman

    Jan 10, 2008
    The plastic strap pin on the bottom of my 1970 Guild Starfire has come loose (as in "out"). I figure that I need to glue it back in, but want to make sure that I'm using a glue that will break free if necessary somewhere down the line. The bass is otherwise near mint and all original and I'd like to keep it that you. Can anybody make a suggestion?
     
  2. earlysecond

    earlysecond In Memoriam

    Jan 26, 2016
    daveman- I have to assume you are talking about the strap retainer to which to connect an actual guitar strap or the pin end of a quick disconnect? Was it not originally secured to the bottom edge of the guitar body with a screw? I think I must be confused as to exactly what you are trying to glue! The part I am thinking of us typically metal and is held to the bottom edge of the guitar with a screw. I am not sure that you want it any less permanent or to "break free". Again if we are talking the same part, and it breaks free, your bass will fall to the ground.

    Before I make any suggestions for re-attaching the piece, please confirm exactly what it is or post a picture of the piece and the hole it is supposed to be attached to.

    Hoping you can get it fixed well. I will now have to search an image of your bass. I did not know Guild made bass guitars, especially the Starfire model. But I am a bit new to all of this so I will go learn!

    Clear up what you are trying to do and you will get great advice, here in the corner, often from Professional Luthiers (of which I am NOT) and the advice comes for free!
    Brent
     
  3. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    Is it something like this:

    nq35nl.jpg

    And if so, is the plastic strap pin held in with a screw, or is the pin just "press fit" into the body? Is there a wood block at the bottom of the guitar into which the screw or peg fits into?

    earlysecond is right - posting a picture will help you get a quicker and correct answer.
     
  4. daveman

    daveman

    Jan 10, 2008

    Yes, I should have given you more details, sorry. As Mapleglow suspected, this is a plastic pin that is press fit into the body. It appears the the pin goes into the center block of the bass as there is solid wood for the length of the insert. You can see the pin and hole in the attached photo. I don't see any residue on either the pin or the hole, so maybe this has been held in place by friction for the last 46 years, and now the hole has expanded. I don't play this bass often, but last time I did the pin came loose and I almost dropped it, which would be horrible.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: May 22, 2016
  5. Beej

    Beej

    Feb 10, 2007
    Vancouver Island
    Those plastic end pins can usually just be pressed into place with no glue and last for a long time, especially ungigged and gently used. If you can use some 180 or 220 grit sandpaper to carefully sand the pin smooth, and wrap a little around the tip of a pencil and gently clean out the hole, they will probably be able to press fit nice and snug again and last that way for a generation.

    If you really want to put a drop of glue in there, I'd probably opt for hide glue, a little bit on the side of the pin, but most of us don't have hide glue kicking around, or the facilities to make it. :) A single drop of white glue on the shaft near the surface should more than resolve this if you really want glue in there.

    Also for future repair questions, the Hardware, Setup and Repair forum will probably get your answers quicker, and its riddled with professional repair guys. :) Although, you're most welcome to kick around here forever too, this is the best luthier forum on the net that I can find... :)
     
  6. daveman

    daveman

    Jan 10, 2008
    Thanks for the response. I don't think sanding will work in this case, as there is already too much play and when pressed in place, the tapered pin goes all the way up to the "stopper" part on the end. I think it's either gotta be a bigger pin or some glue, though I hate to introduce glue where it's never been before.
     
  7. earlysecond

    earlysecond In Memoriam

    Jan 26, 2016
    WOW- Although I will attempt a replica build of the 6 string version of that guitar in the upcoming months. . . .I had NO idea that would be how the strap system worked on it! Yeah, I'm guessing your options, especially without glue, which I understand as your preference. 1. Decrease the inside diameter of the tapered hole in the body 2. Increase the tapered diameter of the peg relative to the hole. Option 2 has to be much easier right? I am thinking that you could slowly build it up with thin super glue in many coats then sand it with some rougher paper like 180 grit to give it some bite. Honestly, that is the first time I have ever seen that set up for a strap. I'm sure you can get it to stay and I would, like you, avoid gluing it at all costs. Is there any chance you could simply get a new peg? OR find a similar one even if you had to file fit and sand it?

    Let us know how you beat your current situation!

    Brent
     
  8. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    If this were my instrument, I'd probably drill out the hole with say, a 3/8" bit, and fill it with a dowel, gluing it into place with titebond glue. Once set, I would either install a new pin - one with a screw - or if you wanted to keep it original, redrill the hole with a tapered bit so a press fit could be re-established.

    If you don't want to go to that level of trouble, you might want to just coat the existing pin with titebond or other wood glue, and press the pin in the hole. Let it cure for 24 hours and that may also re-establish the press fit. I wouldn't push the pin all the way in, leaving enough space to allow the press fit to be re-established after the glue cures.
     
    Beej likes this.
  9. Beej

    Beej

    Feb 10, 2007
    Vancouver Island
    Mapleglo's got the idea but I'd avoided that since its mint and he wanted to keep it that way. If the hole's too wide, then I'd actually look at lining the hole with a thin veneer glued into place to make it tighter. From there it could be reshaped to fit the pin. New pins are also available - stewmac sells some replacement options Search Results for end pin | stewmac.com
     
  10. Manton Customs

    Manton Customs UK Luthier

    Jan 31, 2014
    Shropshire, UK
    Luthier, Manton Customs
    I'd use hide glue as Beej suggested earlier. It would be strong and easily reversible with a warm damp cloth. If that's not an option, a little CA glue would work. With CA if only a spot or two were to be used, the pin could still easily be removed with a good twist if necessary, but should still withstand normal use.

    Hide glue would still be a better approach though.
     
  11. If you want to keep the pin the same a friction fit with a couple toothpicks and a couple dots of white wood glue will do the trick. Had the same thing happen on a Danelectro Longhorn and that's all I did to fix it. Worked fine. Same plastic pin and everything. You could even use a piece of business card soaked in water and jam it in there. Put a couple dots of glue for good measure. The moisture will cause the wood to swell and tighten around the pin.
     
  12. earlysecond

    earlysecond In Memoriam

    Jan 26, 2016
    Wow, OP has a bunch of options. Its interesting too see everybody's different approach.
     
  13. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2002
    Virginia Beach, VA
    I thought it was the drain plug.

    Riis
     
    sissy kathy likes this.
  14. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Arbutus, MD
    Unless you are really, really good at wood working or decide to glue it, you need to take it to a pro. Those tapered plugs that are a friction fit have to match the hole very well to work. If there is even the slightest play between the pin and any part of the hole that pin will work loose and you'll be trying to catch the bass on the way to the floor again. I know it sounds like any easy fix, but it takes more precision than is being explained here to get it right. Research morse taper, this issue is very similar: Machine taper - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2016
    wcriley likes this.
  15. daveman

    daveman

    Jan 10, 2008
    Thanks for the ideas, all. I am going to have to do some more thinking and read up on the info y'all suggested. I'll let you know what I end up doing.
     
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    Primary TB Assistant

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