Which lasts longer and has a good tone Nickel or Stainless Steel?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Dallins_gurl, Jul 5, 2001.

  1. Dallins_gurl


    Jun 11, 2001
    Utah USA
    Hey yo y'all I'm a newbie and i need to know which type of strings work the best and last the longest for just messin around and learnin the bass? Nickel or Stainless Steele?
    Flatwound or Roundwound? Thanx dudes and dudettes!
  2. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    I don't know a definitive answer because brand quality, whether you clean your hands before playing, wipe down your strings and instrument after playing, and even the acidity of your body oils are some the major determinants of string longetivity.

    You'll probably notice the least change in nickel flatwounds, IMO. They aren't blindingly bright right out of the box like stainless roundwounds. Roundwounds lose their unmistakeable zing, like the lower notes on a grand piano, after a while. So when they go, the difference is really discernible.

    DR and D'Addario are just two popular brands around here.
  3. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Thomastik-Infeld jazz flats last for years and get better with age.
  4. DaveB


    Mar 29, 2000
    Toronto Ontario
    Even though you're new to bass ( welcome by the way) you probably have some bass players / bands whose tone/music you like.That would help us give you more exacting advice.
  5. I can recommend without a doubt D'Addario EXL165 for a 4 string. Nickel roundwound, 105 - 45 is where it's at.

  6. DR Steel Lo-riders!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  7. seamus


    Feb 8, 2001
    No doubt
  8. Strings for guitarists are as personal a thing as tampons are for women. Try them all and decide for yourself which works best.
  9. That is true. The only rule to both is "Don't try secondhand!":eek:

  10. seamus


    Feb 8, 2001
    Nickel is usually more consistent over time because their loss in sound is not as noticeable as with stainless in most cases. Nickel might feel better on the hands too, and many players claim they cause less wear and tear on your bass (fretboard).

    If you are starting out, try a reasonable set of nickel roundwounds. Maybe try a medium gauge set, 45-65-85-105. If you find those are too heavy, you can always go for something lighter, but I believe most people play medium gauge.

    I say to try something reasonably priced because the search for a string you like best can cost a good amount of money until you find the one you like best. Good luck!