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Which Lemon Oil ?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by MichiBass, Feb 15, 2006.


  1. So, I have a Fender Highway One Jazz Bass, with rosewood fretboard, and when I got the bass, the rosewood seemed pretty "un-oiled", very dry...

    So I decided to get a lemon oil. I decided to choose one of these :

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Additional info on these can be found here http://www.jimdunlop.com/products/maintenance/index.html

    Which is better? Which should I get? How do I apply it? How much?
     
  2. i just use the lemon oil that wal-mart has. lemon oil is just lemon oil. its probably alot cheaper and you get more. i put it on with a lint free cloth let it sit for a minuite or two then buff off with another lint free cloth. what a differance it makes. good luck with your choice. in the picture 01 is a cleaner and 02 is the oil. i find the lemon oil takes off the oils that your fingers leave.
     
  3. Kronos

    Kronos

    Dec 28, 2005
    Philadelphia, PA
    I use Formbys. I mean, hey, it's formulated for wood, and it's a reputable brand. I've noticed that the specialty stuff for guitars is overpriced.
     
  4. SBassman

    SBassman

    Jun 8, 2003
    Northeast, US
    Put a single small drop on the rag.
    You now have enough for about 1/3 the board.

    Seriously, oiling the board is one of the most over done activities, and this behavior is stoked here. If you put too much oil on your board, you're Destined to have frets that lift later.

    The type of oil isn't that important. But use it super, super, super sparingly. You should be able to do the whole board with a few drops - I'm serious.
     
  5. Kronos

    Kronos

    Dec 28, 2005
    Philadelphia, PA
    I oil my board once a year, if that. So far, so good. And yes, use it SPARINGLY. Be sure to wipe off any excess!
     
  6. So, I have no Wal-Mart here in Romania, I have a friend in Austria, who can buy me one of these for 5 Euro.

    Should I get the first one, because it's JUST Lemon Oil?
     
  7. i use dunlop 65 lemon oil, it does the job fine. Bit expensive but I'm lucky enough to not have to pay for it.
     
  8. mamm7215

    mamm7215

    Mar 23, 2005
    Most "lemon oils" are mineral oils with lemon added. Too much will eat the fret glue, hence lifting frets...
     
  9. SBassman

    SBassman

    Jun 8, 2003
    Northeast, US
    Something that eats the glue is one part of it, but the other is - softening the wood from too much oil.
     
  10. PB+J

    PB+J

    Mar 9, 2000
    arlington va
    Oiling the board is just way overrated--there is just no need to do it. Rosewood is very hard, it's naturally oily, your fingers have oil; oil on wood does nothing for it except change the look. It doens't prevent it from drying out, it doesn't "nourish" the wood or any of that crap; the wood is dead. It darkens the wood and brings out the grain in nice way, but so does time and use.

    I remember a thread years ago on "the Bottom line" where both Roger Sadowsky and rick turner said that oil was not needed, but if you want to oil the board don't use lemon oil, use boiled (not raw) linseed oil. You can get it at hardware stores.
     
  11. SGT. Pepper

    SGT. Pepper Banned

    Nov 20, 2005
    Phila,Pa.
    Mineral oil or Hoppe's NO-9 oil. Clear oils are the way to go. You want a high viscosity and fast penetrating oil. I use the Hoppe's. Like others have posted once a year is enough, maybe twice if you play outdoors a lot and live in a dry climate. I do it once a year and have no problems. Stay away from linseed oil. Linseed oil is used to make stain and is too, too heavy. Pure lemon oil is good if you can find it but the common lemon oil is mostly petroleum distallates { paint thinner}. I also use orange oil wipes to clean my fretboards. Orange oil cleans and nourishes but it is not good alone. If you can't find Hoppe's use mineral oil.
     
  12. SBassman

    SBassman

    Jun 8, 2003
    Northeast, US
    > Oiling the board is just way overrated

    Absolutely.

    > your fingers have oil

    Playing the bass is about all it needs.
     
  13. PB+J

    PB+J

    Mar 9, 2000
    arlington va
    Mineral oil? Why? What does it do? Nothing--it just gums the board up, it never cures. Raw linseed oil, like mineral oil, will just gum things up, because it doesn't cure either. BOILED linseed oil "cures." It hardens so you don't end up with an oily board. Mineral oil--ugh. You'll just end up softening the wood so the frets lift. It's going to collect, uncured, right in the fret slots where you don't want it.

    You don't need to "penetrate the wood"--the fingerboard is going to be as dry or as wet as the environment it's in, like any piece of wood.

    A great source on finishes for wood is Robert Flexner's "Understanding Wood Finishing." It really explains how the different kinds of finishes work, what they do, advantages and disadvantages, etc. Oiling the board is purely cosmetic and can even be harmful
     
  14. SGT. Pepper

    SGT. Pepper Banned

    Nov 20, 2005
    Phila,Pa.
    Note key words { Use Sparingly! } Thats with any oil. Too much of any oil will damage the board.
     
  15. BurningSkies

    BurningSkies CRAZY BALDHEAD

    Feb 20, 2005
    Seweracuse, NY
    I agree...Don't oil frequently or over-oil.

    My 73 P doesn't ever get oiled and is just fine.

    I do have a Tele with a Brazilian rosewood board that doesn't get played often or for terribly long, and after about 4 years I noticed that the rosewood was getting lighter and slightly chalky...I DID oil that board (lightly) and it's been fine ever since.
     
  16. 62bass

    62bass

    Apr 3, 2005
    Flexner's book on wood finishing is good.

    I wouldn't use lemon oil. As pointed out earlier it's just a non drying mineral oil with lemon scent added. None of these treatments nourish the wood. The wood is deader than a doornail.

    I use a small amount of boiled linseed oil after I've cleaned the fingerboard. Let it soak in a couple minutes then wipe it off and don't leave any on the frets. It hardens unlike mineral oil. But I only do it once a year or less and only for appearance. It brings out the grain and deepens the colour.

    I use boiled linseed oil on unfinished furniture that I plan to varnish clear to bring out the grain more.

    Boiled linseed oil does darken in the wood over time. More than tung oil does.
     
  17. I used Dr. Ducks Axe Wax which is not a wax but an oil and I use it only twice a year. Put it on, let it sit a minute or two to soak in then wipe the excess off.
     
  18. xshawnxearthx

    xshawnxearthx

    Aug 23, 2004
    new jersey
    i have never done this to any of the guitars or basses that i own. i was actually glad i read this thread because i had planned on using oil on the board once i was done with the set up but now i probably wont.


    my one co worker said to try baby oil.
     
  19. SGT. Pepper

    SGT. Pepper Banned

    Nov 20, 2005
    Phila,Pa.
    Oil before you set up and change your strings. You can take all the strings off if you are only going to leave it that way for less than an hour. The neck won't come out of whack unless you change string guage. I know many speak against this when doing a regular string change but to oil a board you have to take off the strings.
     
  20. 62bass

    62bass

    Apr 3, 2005
    my one co worker said to try baby oil.[/QUOTE]

    Baby oil is mineral oil with a scent added.