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Why are my springs not doing a job, and is it bad for the bass?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by kraziestkhris, Jan 25, 2012.


  1. Bad

    28.1%
  2. Not Bad

    71.9%
  1. kraziestkhris

    kraziestkhris

    Nov 28, 2011
    My Squier Fender P-Bass has springs on it, but they are just sitting there doing nothing (except making the occasional buzzing sound because they have room to rattle. Is it bad for my bass or no?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. JLS

    JLS

    Sep 12, 2008
    Emeryville, Ca
    I setup & repair guitars & basses
    No, not bad. Why would it be?

    You can remove them, stretch them out, and replace them.
     
  3. kraziestkhris

    kraziestkhris

    Nov 28, 2011
    Well what are they exactly for?
     
  4. spaz21387

    spaz21387

    Feb 25, 2008
    Portland oregon
    to keep tension on the bridge saddles and keep them from moving much.
     
  5. michael_atw

    michael_atw

    Feb 28, 2009
    Jamestown, NY
    The saddles are too far out if they're not "doing their job" and making noise.
     
  6. makkE

    makkE

    Jan 19, 2010
    Normandie, France
    Not necessarily, all depends on the preferred setup.
    I have a bass with tiny pieces of cardboard between string and spring to keep them from rattling, and it's intonated properly.

    @kraziestkhris:

    Minor thing, but you might want to loosen your e-string and cautiously remove or peel back a little bit of the silk wrap, so your saddle makes contact with the blank string.
     
  7. 96tbird

    96tbird PLEASE STAND BY Supporting Member

    Have you learned how to intonate your bass? I have never seen all saddles up at the end like that on an properly strung and intonated bass, ever. Or is that bridge just really short? You will have to remove some silk to get bare string on the properly adjusted saddles. The springs are to help hold the saddles in place when set: so the string vibrations don't make the intonation screws turn. If they rattle, take them off and stretch them out a bit. Learn intonation; it may be good, but it looks weird to me.

    Makke, the preferred setup is intonated, wherever the saddles may lie when set. Has nada to do with preference; it's intonated or it isn't, period; unless your preference is to be out of tune.
     
  8. makkE

    makkE

    Jan 19, 2010
    Normandie, France
    I was excluding intonation from "preferred setup" of course. Just saying that string type and action/relief can in some cases lead to rattling springs, even if intonation is correct.
     
  9. StrangerDanger

    StrangerDanger Supporting Member

    Jan 3, 2010
    This
     
  10. Intonation is suspect if the saddles are that far to the front...
    I'd learn to adjust intonation (lots of info, including video, if you google) and I am pretty sure the saddles will go back a lot, and the springs will be compressed, eliminating the rattling.
     
  11. SDMFJay

    SDMFJay

    Jan 27, 2011
    Are you sure your bridge is set up for perfect intonation? looks like it was factory mounted and not set up at all imo.
     
  12. Rune Bivrin

    Rune Bivrin Supporting Member

    Oct 2, 2006
    Huddinge, Sweden
    Or maybe the intonation is off...

    :bag:
     
  13. michael_atw

    michael_atw

    Feb 28, 2009
    Jamestown, NY
    My guess is, it might not be intonated well but let's remember...it's a Squier. Who knows, it might be intonated just fine at that point ;)
     
  14. Rune Bivrin

    Rune Bivrin Supporting Member

    Oct 2, 2006
    Huddinge, Sweden
    When I think about iit, I wonder if maybe a shim might be in order. :D
     
  15. While in this context that is funny, a shim can change the neck angle(IME 2-3 cards' thickness at the heel end of the neck pocket increased the angle of my Fender Jazz 5, adding just enough open-string scale length to my low B, making it possible to intonate. The B saddle had previously been all the way back & was till slightly sharp at the 12th fret); in the highly-unlikely event that the saddles are as close to properly adjusted as possible, he may need to decrease the neck angle- which can be acheived by shimming the nut-ward:)hmm:)end of the neck pocket.
    Again- IMO this would be HIGHLY unlikely.
     
  16. JLS

    JLS

    Sep 12, 2008
    Emeryville, Ca
    I setup & repair guitars & basses
    You've got to be joking.
     
  17. 96tbird

    96tbird PLEASE STAND BY Supporting Member

    Meme. Get real. The op deserves more than to read useless junk like that.
     
  18. A Squier is just fine, please this is not the right thread for that nonsense which can worry/confuse the op unnecessarily.
     
  19. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    Just a wild guess, but....check the intonation. :p

    (And ignore the Squier-bashing...it's irrelevant and untrue.)

    It's not hurting anything. Rattles can be corrected by stretching the springs. Or likely, by fixing the intonation.
     

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