Why Buy A Six String ?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Jayb118, Dec 16, 2005.

  1. Jayb118


    Dec 6, 2005
    Isle of Wight
    Hi ive been playing a 5 string bass for a while now and love, the added B string is so useful. I was considering buyin a 6 string bass to gain the use of the high C but im unsure. Can anyone point out the pros and cons for me please?
  2. quallabone


    Aug 2, 2003
    Pro's - High C String

    Con's - High C string

    If you want a high C string it seems like a good solution. If you don't then I'd probably shy away from them.
  3. Figjam


    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Heh ^ basically.

    I dont see myself ever needing a 6 string, but theres nothing wrong with it. Im sure its used for the same reasons you play a 5,easier positioning, to get that extra HIGH note this time though, instead of extra low.
  4. cgworkman


    May 14, 2004
    That and there aren't a lot of people making six-string basses when you look at the big picture. Sure, there's more than there used to be - but the six-string is still the 'little guy' in the bass world.
  5. Why Buy A Six String ?

    because you have totally mastered the 4 and 5 string basses.
    IMO. :cool:
  6. bound


    Dec 28, 2003
    Jersey, Baby!
    I think that a new direction that six strings are taking and that I'm playing around with is a low F# string instead of the high C. I found the C usefull for lead parts on Rush covers and such, but I barely do solos and hardly used it. The F#, however, is fun as hell to groove on, and helps if you've got guitarists that insist on downtuning.
  7. cgworkman


    May 14, 2004
  8. Figjam


    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Its not possible to totally master even a 4 string.

    I think you are playing the wrong instrument.

    :bag: :confused:
  9. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oh, really? Who has mastered the 4 string?


    Less position shifting, more notes available in every position.

    Makes sight reading easier.

    Helps you clean up your technique, unless you like the sound of a bunch of open strings ringing out.

    The C string has a different timbre than the other strings.


    When I play a six, I tend to overplay. Well, I always tend to overplay, but I do it worse on a six.

    Requires better technique, especially muting.

    The C string has a different timbre than the other strings.

    There are more pros and cons than these, of course, but these are the ones that come to mind first.
  10. vacman


    Mar 8, 2004
    portland, or
    what does it mean to "master" a four string of five string bass? I need some Advil.... :confused:
  11. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    If you're unsure, then you don't need one. Real simple answer to your question. No one owns everything, it's okay not to have one especially if you're not sure.
  12. Petary791


    Feb 20, 2005
    Michigan, USA
    Like somebody else said, not having to move out of position is pretty awesome. It also makes it really easy to improv and solo in my opinion.
  13. Demens


    Apr 23, 2005
    Waco, Texas
    I'm really toying with the idea of a 6 or 7... or 9 string bass for the future.

    Not really because I "need" it, but more to experiment with playing different types of music. Like transcribing piano pieces and tapping them (like Jean Baudin does). Just sounds like a lot of fun for some solo work to do.

    (Right now I am playing my Warmoth Gecko 5)

    It is hard to say "go play a 6"... Because there really arn't that large of a selection to play with. Maybe just find a friend that has one well set up and play it to see if you like the feel.
  14. Greg Johnsen

    Greg Johnsen

    May 1, 2005
    Hickory NC
    pro-High c

    con- none

    I can't even play a 5 string anymore, it just feels wrong,

  15. Petary791


    Feb 20, 2005
    Michigan, USA
    YEah I agree with you. For me, it's either 6 or 4.
  16. I ain't waiting for THAT to happen. My reason? Chris Stambaugh is reasonable, but he don't give it away. ;)
  17. Matt Morgan

    Matt Morgan Fellow Conspirator Supporting Member

    Oct 21, 2001
    Plano, TX
    I've played 6 string basses for about the last ten years.
    Most of the pros have already been stated and I agree. For the playing I was doing at the time, they were awesome and I loved every minute of it. Never even thought about 4s or 5s. However,...
    I've found over the last couple of years that I wasn't playing in those upper registers very much, if at all, and for the type of music that I play now, 5 string basses seem to suit me much better. I've found 5 string basses to be much more comfortable and more "natural feeling" these days.
    I'm selling my 6ers and am picking up five strings again. I like the tone of the G string in the upper registers better than the C string these days too.
    Things change! I say play whatever you want for as long as you want and if you feel like changing to something different, there will always be a fellow TBer interested in buying whatever you're selling!
    Good luck with your decision!
  18. The Eristic

    The Eristic Supporting Member

    Mar 19, 2005
    Cartersville, GA
    A six is next on my plate. My playing is heavily chordal, and after checking out a 6-string F-Bass, I realized I MUST have one. The high C is unbelievably useful for chordal work. It's even made me consider selling/trading one my beloved LG-3005s, which is not something I had EVER seriously thought about before. :^|
  19. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    I mainly play fives and sixes and I find I do the most overplaying when I grab a four. For instance my Elrick NJS 4 makes me act like a damn fool. Funny huh, Jeff?

    BTW I've been gigging with fours lately and find I don't miss the low B at all when I'm playing one. Of course when I'm playing a 5 or 6 I'm free to use it.