will a compressor or limiter help ?

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by whitehouse, Feb 1, 2002.

  1. My Humbucker has got an awesome high output ... how can I remove the highest outputs ??? (my amp sometumes clips ..)

    is it a good thing to use a compressor / limiter ??

    my bass : Warwick F.N.A. Jazzman 5

  2. Possibly.. If you want i can drop by sometime with my compressor.. so you can try it

    PM me :)
  3. IMO lower output pickups sound better. High output humbuckers are too middy, and characterless.

    But each to his own.

    Have you tried just turning the volume down?
  4. it's an option, but the option I do not like at all ..

    the low tones produce the clipping on my amp, and that's why I think that a compressor maybe helps in this matter ?

    can you guys maybe give some good brands to look at ?

    what is the difference (call me a newbe) between a limiter and a compressor ?

    and waht exactly does an enhancer do ?
  5. A limiter is just heavy compression. If you set a compressor's ratio to 10:1 or higher, it is more of a limiter.
  6. enhancer can mean a lot of things ... on my compressor, its a knob that corrects robbery of treble by the compressor .
  7. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    A limiter is just a compressor with the ratio set at °° (infinity):1
  8. SuperDuck


    Sep 26, 2000
    Well, what is your amp/bass set at? If you have the bass cranked on your active bass and the EQ jacked up on the amp, there could be clipping all over the place. A flatter EQ setting could help, if that's the case.
  9. okay.. first .. I am still a newbe in this stuff so please forgive me my dumb questions :)

    1. if the amp clips with the gain at 0.1 , won't it clip even more when I push up the gain ?
    (at what place does it clip .. before the EQ or after ?)

    2. even warwick says the humbucker gives a very loud signal

    3. my eq on bass is at max performance, the best sound for the PA-system.. I have a DI between the bass and amp, so the signal to the PA-system is going direct form my bass to the system ..
    I just have to make the best of the sound in the amp
  10. Laddieo


    Dec 16, 2001
    First. Does the amp clip in the same manner without the DI in place? If it does not, then the problem may be the DI.

    Assuming that the same clipping is present...

    Uhhh... "max performance?" What does this mean exactly? I've been playing, performing, recording for more that 20 years, and although I am still learning, I have only heard this term used in one way.

    In the old days, we used to leave our tone controls wide open, because back then (and with any bass that does not have a battery inside) the tone knobs were only capable of "cutting the highs".

    Now however, with active eq, the eq knobs are generally capable of both cut and BOOST. It's the boost concept that may be giving you troubles. If you've got an active eq (battery?) and your tone controls are at "max," you are likely driving the daylights out of everything. Whoever is running the "PA" has an input attenuator at the mixing console, so if you're sending him or her too much signal, they're just turning you down. But that doesn't help your clipping problem on stage now does it?

    First, set up your rig so that it sounds good to your ears. THEN plug into the DI and let the soundman do their job. If they're taking a DI signal from your instrument, they should NOT have to interfere with your tone settings in order to manage the house PA. (Though you should always be willing to adjust your stage volume to what is appropriate for the house).

    Is there a center detent on the eq knob? That's a place where it sort of "clicks into place" in the middle, as you rotate it back and forth? If there is, start there. Thats no cut, no boost. If there's no detent, it may be an all boost system (like the Aguilar OBP-1. If that's the case, start with the tone control rolled all the way back (counter clockwise).

    So now your eq is "flat." No Cut. No Boost. Then add (or cut) a moderate amount of eq. to taste. But keep an eye on your clipping. If you're a beginner, it's very likely that your taste is "all tone controls all the way up." It's a beginner thing. If that's the case, try using almost none, then add little bit at a time. With time, you'll probably find that a little can go a long way.

    If somebody told you that "wide open" was the way to set your tone controls. They were probably referring to the old school "tone knob" eq's. "roll it one way is't bass, the other treble." The same theory DOES NOT APPLY to active eq settings.

    Worry about your own sound first. Let the house soundman worry about the house. Never forget though, that the house soundman has a "suck knob" on his board. So always be nice and friendly, and turn down your stage volume if they ask you to. Otherwise they can turn that little knob and make you shoud like you "suck" in the house.

    Have fun
  11. thanks for the lessons !!
    the hard thing is ..
    My amp cannot make the sound that my bass wants to make, so I do not know what sound I am giving to the PA-man through the DI ..
  12. Laddieo


    Dec 16, 2001
    How do you know what sound your bass wants to make?

    If he put's a direct box between you and your amp, he's getting the EXACT sound of your bass.

    Did you try what I suggested?
  13. ehm..well let me put it this way.. the soundman that works with us does not know realy how to mix a bass (jet) .. it's in a church, so we cannot choose our soundmans :)

    when I mix my bass with the bass-eq, I just put my knobs on my amp all on "0" .. so then I can hear at best (I think) what my bass is sending to the PA-mix.. the best thing for me is to sit behind the PA-mixer, and try what the best mix is (eq mix on bass I mean)