Wireless Frequency Troubles

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by christos, Mar 19, 2002.

  1. Okay, my wireless is 776.150 MHz, the guitar player is 801.875 MHz and his mic is 803.750 MHz. When I turn on my body pack his "mic" reciever goes nuts. It does not matter if I mute the body pack or not, just the power itself is driving his unit nuts. I have other options as far as UHF frequencies I can get, but I have to order another specific frequency. How will I know if the other frequencies, won't screw with his? I am totally clueless when it comes to this sh... , I mean stuff.

    Thanks in advance...
  2. HeavyDuty

    HeavyDuty Supporting Curmudgeon Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 26, 2000
    Suburban Chicago, IL
    25 MHz is enough separation that this shouldn't happen, so either your bodypack is throwing off spurs or his receiver is a POS. See if you can find a local ham or scanner enthusiast to "sniff" your bodypack to see if it's clean. If it's OK, your bud's receiver is to fault.

    Is either of your stuff still under warranty?
  3. Paul A

    Paul A

    Dec 13, 1999
    Hertfordshire U.K!
    Sounds like your unit might be "over modulating"
    There should be some kind of adjustment for this,probably a small trimmer pot on the xmitter board.
  4. This thingy is very common in small clubs with metal frames in the concrete.

    The signal is transmitted, and is received.. but since the signal is transmitted in all directions, the signal will be bounced by the metal and concrete..

    if more than one signals do this, they generate another frequency, a so-called " ghost " frequency..

    then there's the local-oscilator.. some receivers have a local oscilator generates a small RF signal that is exactly 10.7Mhz below the wireless's frequency.. this is called the Intermediate frequency. it helps to improve the input signal.

    it's very well possible that the ghost-signal ,generated by the guitarist's and your wireless transmitters, is exactly at 10.7 mhz below the mic's frequency.. causing it to freak out.
  5. b.t.w. this is one of the reasons why my guitarist has a VHF and i have an UHF wireless..

    different frequency-ranges.. no problems :)
  6. Thank you all for your input, I called Shure and they told me that another frequency may work. I have only had mine for about 5 days, and the owner's of the music store are friends of mine, so they said no problem, they already ordered the other frequency. BTW tech support for Shure is great, they are extremely helpful, and very nice.

    Thanks again to all that replied....