Wireless monitoring systems (not IEM's)

Discussion in 'Live Sound [BG]' started by mapleglo, Sep 28, 2018.


  1. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    There's been several threads on IEM's, but those speak to in-ear monitors themselves. What about the wireless system - the unit that sends audio from your mixer to the in-ear monitor? Is the Shure the only game in town? The Audio Technica system has received some pretty poor reviews, mostly relating to inadequate volume control. And the Sennheiser systems do not have many reviews at all. And then there's a bunch of off-name units, some very inexpensive, which I'm not too sure I'd want to take a chance on.

    If I wanted to go wired, our drummer is actually using a Behringer headphone amp that costs $50.00. I listened through it yesterday and it sounded pretty good. But I don't know I'd want another wire holding me down.

    The Shure PSM 300, @ $799.00 (or $699.00 for the plastic case unit) looks like the "go to" system. Anyone have any experience with any other units?

    Is there potential for any interference with my Audio Technica system 10 guitar wireless system? Is there a unit that will do both - receive wireless monitoring and send my bass audio?

    Lots of questions...
     
  2. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    yes shure psm300 is indeed a go-to (get the metal pack) as is the senn G3, no it won't interfere with the guitar wireless, no they don't make one box that does both. (you don't want that, the boxes for sending one and receiving the other shouldn't even be next to each other)
     
  3. s0c9

    s0c9 Supporting Member

    Jan 9, 2014
    Ft.Worth/Dallas
    1964 Audio artist, Fractal Audio Beta Tester
    What @walterw said !! :hyper::hyper:
     
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  4. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    Thanks!
     
  5. s0c9

    s0c9 Supporting Member

    Jan 9, 2014
    Ft.Worth/Dallas
    1964 Audio artist, Fractal Audio Beta Tester
    Tho. I do have to ask.. Why would you want wireless if you are NOT going IEM?
    I don't see the point? Explain ??
     
  6. musicman7722

    musicman7722

    Feb 12, 2007
    Hampton NH
    I THINK HE WANTS TO DISCUSS THE DIFFERENT TRANSMITTERS NOT THE BUDS.

    Sorry about the caps.

    I started with a Sure PSM200 then onto the Sennheiser G300. Pricey but the Sennheiser was worth the money, buy once and cry once :)
     
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  7. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    Yes, I've decided on the IEM, now I'm looking for the wireless transmitter and receiver. So you think the Sennheiser is actually better then the Shure PSM 300? The EW-300 received mixed reviews on Amazon:

    https://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-E..._rd_t=40701&psc=1&refRID=6WXVRQ0DDC9CH1ND0CQB
     
  8. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    For what it's worth, I borrowed the Drummer's Sure unit - I forgot to look at the model number but I think it's the PSM-300. I used my ear buds that I normally use with my iPhone. They sound surprisingly good. The only issue is that the battery was almost dead, and I was getting like a tremolo effect through the system intermittently. But when it worked, it was like a light from heaven descended in our practice room. It's that much better than a floor monitor, even with cheap ear buds and a low battery.


    I think my smile says it all.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2018
  9. I just picked up a nady pem 1000 system ill check back and update on its quality later. It looks to be the best looking stereo setup in It's price range at $269. I'm hoping it doesn't suck.
     
  10. derrico1

    derrico1 Supporting Member

    Apr 12, 2005
    Charlottesville, VA
    If you don't mind the heavy gauge pigtail cable from your Ric, then you probably wouldn't feel at all weighed down by a combo instrument/IEM cable.

    If your bass is wired, running wired IEM is not only cheaper, but it can bypass battery problems and frequency crowding of the wireless systems. And until you get up to the more robust wireless systems, wired will sound better.
     
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  11. jaco944

    jaco944 Supporting Member

    Apr 13, 2005
    Hard to go wrong with Sennheiser.
     
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  12. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    I use wired during practice but I run wireless for my bass when we play live. Running wired for IEM's is *a lot* cheaper. We just bought a wired Behringer headphone amp for our drummer. It was $50.00, and it sounds great. The wireless Shure PSM-300 system I'm looking at is $799.00. I'm already investing in buying a bunch of batteries for each gig with my wireless for the bass. It won't be too much more for the IEM. Frequency crowding may be an issue though. We'll see.

    I have an older Nady wireless system I used for my bass for a short time. I wasn't impressed. I think when it comes to wireless systems, you get what you pay for.

    It looks like the current Sennheiser system is the G4, at $999.00. I'm wondering if it's $200.00 better than the Shure?
     
  13. I’ve got about 20 some Senn G3 EW100 transmitter/receiver pairs at work.
    They have been in service for years.
    These are mostly used by students and are subject to all sorts of abuse.
    We’ve never had any issues with any of them.

    Be sure that anything you buy is compliant with the new FCC regulations.
    It is possible that there will be used ones on the market that do not comply with the new regulations.
    These will either be sold by those who are unaware of the changes, but there might be those who just want to unload soon to be illegal junk on an unsuspecting buyer.
    Basically they must operate below 608 MHz.
    Reputable dealers know not to unload illegal units as they would face FCC fines fir doing so.

    You also need to select frequencies that don’t conflict with local TV stations and other sources where you are operating. Shure and Sennheiser will both be very good about helping you with frequency selection.

    Just this week I had a student checking in some gear and he reported that the wireless mic was noisy.
    I checked it, and not only had someone changed the frequency, they set it so it was operating in the same frequency range as one of our local TV stations. What made it worse was that the student was operating about two miles away from the TV station’s transmitter.
     
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  14. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    here’s where rechargeables make the most sense. both my wireless (line 6 G75) and in-ears (old psm700) are set up with battery chargers in their respective cases, so when they get plugged in i’ve got spare batteries cooking right there.

    a night of playing is enough time to charge the spares, while the sets in the units are enough to last at least a night. at the beginning of each gig i just swap in fresh and i’m good to go.
     
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  15. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    it’s not so bad if you do it right.

    if the guitar wireless is fully digital and on the 2.4GHz band then it won’t be a factor, otherwise just make sure the various wireless things are set to different frequencies.
     
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  16. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    Yeah, there's that initial investment for the rechargeable batteries and the charger, which can amount to a couple hundred dollars, but after about 10 gigs or so, it's a wash, after which, the rechargeables are saving money. And then one can use them for practice as well.
     
  17. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    One other thing - the Shure unit has a TRS cable input, which requires an XLR to TRS cable. And it's a female XLR to male TRS. The Sennheiser has XLR inputs. It may not be a big deal to some people, but I dislike having to carry extra proprietary cables around, which I'd have to do with the Shure. The Sennheiser just uses standard XLR cables, of which we have plenty. The Senn G4 is moving up. It's a little more money, but it eliminates the cable issue.
     
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  18. It isn’t always just that simple.
    You can be on different frequencies and still have problems due to inter-mod or I.F. issues.
    Many of the better units will have presets that won’t create intermod issues when using two or more of the same brand.

    Intermod happens when the fundamental of one frequency mixes with the harmonic of another and produces a third frequency that lands on or near another of your wireless operating frequencies.

    I.F. or Intermediate Frequency is a system used in pretty much all modern radios.
    If a mix of two frequencies (see inter-mod) lands on your systems I.F. it can cause problems.
     
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  19. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    Just for reference, I have the Audio Technica System 10 for my bass wireless.

    atsystem10.jpg
     
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  20. Wasnex

    Wasnex

    Dec 25, 2011

    In my experience IEM receivers tend to have a lot more drop outs than wireless mics and instrument packs. We used top of the line Shure units that scan the frequency spectrum and tried active blade and helical antennas. We still experienced too many drop outs. The band was ampless so random dropouts were pretty critical.

    I suspect part of the problem is interaction between the instrument transmitter and the IEM receiver. The best you can do is wear them on opposite sides of the body and ensure compatible frequencies that are as far apart as possible.
     
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