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Wireless Routers Anyone?

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by DanGouge, Sep 18, 2005.


  1. DanGouge

    DanGouge

    May 25, 2000
    Canada!
    If I wanted to set up wireless for a home with, say, three desktops and the likely addition of a laptop, what makes and models should I consider? I've looked around a bit and it seems like Linksys, D-Link, and Netgear are the main players. I'd like something that combines the usual assets like reliability, speed, security, et cetera. I know there are at least a few IT-types on here, what do you use, what do you recommend?
     
  2. I've had good luck with the linksys. You can set encryption, no broadcast of ssid, allowing only listed mac addresses to connect to prevent people using your network. Its worked well with some other brands of network cards too, as its supposed to. They "should" all be interchangeable with each other.

    Randy
     
  3. FireBug

    FireBug

    Sep 18, 2005
    Houston
    I would also recommend Linksys. Very fast and gives a strong signal. Easy on the wallet. I replaced a new D-Link with Linksys because the D-Link kept overheating and shutting down. The signal was also extremely weak...even with a booster. You can pick up a good wireless router for around 70 bucks.
     
  4. Tsal

    Tsal

    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    I'm a bit disappointed with the D-Link router we have in our student flat. It can be quite laggy sometimes - although I'm not sure if it's the connection or the router - and bit unstable, so I'd recommend something different.
     
  5. DaftCat

    DaftCat

    Jul 26, 2004
    Medicine Hat
    +1 for LinkSys.

    Nerd mode: Their firmware is GPL and LinkSys firmware are now made by CISCO.

    DCat
     
  6. I've used two Netgear ones (parents' house and apartment) and haven't had any trouble with either. Can't compare it to Linksys though.
     
  7. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    I own a D-Link DI-614+, it is alright. I have not had any technical problems with it, but it does put out a weak signal. Linksys is much better, and the Cisco connection makes them an even better product.

    No home user friendly wireless router is going to have great security features. They are easily hackable as is. I suggest you do some research on wireless security, and spend some time configuring a firewall.

    -Mike
     
  8. westland

    westland

    Oct 8, 2004
    Hong Kong
  9. I had a D-link 614+. The wireless capability didn't work unless the network cards were 2 feet from the router, but that might have been the cards. (yes, I set up the router properly) It can still use Ethernet cables, so I just set up the network that way.

    About half a year later, the router just died. Turned off, wouldn't turn back on. I sent it back for a new one under warranty. A few weeks later, I had a working router again. Yay. It died again in the exact same way 6 months later. The warranty was gone at that point. D-Link sucks ime.
     
  10. Mike N

    Mike N Missing the old TB

    Jan 28, 2001
    New York
    Currently using a Netgear MR814 v2. No complaints so far, I've been using it for 1 year.
     
  11. DanGouge

    DanGouge

    May 25, 2000
    Canada!
    The bulking up site looks really cool, but I'm nearly comfortable enough with that kind of thing to attempt it on my own. How does one get a 3rd party OS installed on a Linksys anyway? Do you just Google it and then download something?
     
  12. First time I use a wireless router, so maybe I cant be of that much help, but for about a month I been using a D-Link G54 with my laptop in my house, and its been excellent no drop outs or lost of signals.
     
  13. westland

    westland

    Oct 8, 2004
    Hong Kong
    The one I use is Sveasoft's ... there are a lot of them out there. Go to http://www.wrt54g.net/pages.php?p=firmware for the following firmware:

    - Earthlink: IPv6 support, considered Alpha quality (Latest Version: Alpha)
    - Ewrt: Allows users to create hotspots (Latest Version: .03 beta1)
    - HyperWRT: Mininal extra features, fast, for most users (Latest Version: 2.1b1)
    - Linksys: Official Firmware, least features, most stable (Latest Version: 3.03.6)
    - OpenWRT: Advanced firmware, Linux experience required (Latest Version: Apr 23, 05)
    - Sveasoft: One of the most popular, many features (Latest Version: Alchemy)
    - TinyPEAP: Based off Sveasoft's Satori, this stable RADIUS server is great for advanced users. (Latest Version: 2.12 Beta)
    - Wifibox: A development with many features (Latest Version: 2.02.2.2)
     
  14. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Keep away from that stuff until you are more comfortable with the technology. You should probably invest your time in understanding how a firewall works, and how you can configure one. You will have security issues with a wireless network more so than a wired one.

    -Mike
     
  15. DanGouge

    DanGouge

    May 25, 2000
    Canada!
    Yeah, I'd agree with that. Conceptually I have a crude idea of how a firewall works, but it's roughly equivalent to understanding that car engine converts gasoline and air into mechanical energy without knowing how the various parts achieve said conversion.
     
  16. Tash

    Tash

    Feb 13, 2005
    Bel Air Maryland
    FYI Apples do not like Linksys. Not sure why but they have trouble staying connected.

    I have a Linksys WAP and a Netgear WAP?Router. I had no problems with the linksys but when I moved to my new apartment I switched from DSL to Comcast. I wanted a single router/AP solution and asked my friend who works for Comcast what he has the LEAST trouble with on their network. The answer was the Netgear, Linksys and D-Link being the most problem prone.
     
  17. westland

    westland

    Oct 8, 2004
    Hong Kong
    There is some truth to this; though unless you experiment, you are never going to learn. That's why they put RESET buttons on the wireless boxes ;)
     
  18. westland

    westland

    Oct 8, 2004
    Hong Kong
    Sorry if I quote myself, but ... the first thing you should learn about a wireless router is WHERE THEY PUT THE RESET BUTTON. Note that there are also Hard and Soft resets. Hard reset generally requires you hold the button for half a minute, pull the plug and other such nonesense. No one except the lone engineer who programmed the router seems to have a clue as to what a Hard reset does ... but it always seems to work when nothing else will.
     
  19. +1 more for the linksys, but don't forget to read the various information for each and pick network cards that have no known compatibility issues with the router. Also, check on the warranty, and make sure where you buy it has a return policy in case you get it home and the thing doesn't work the way you want.
     
  20. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Yes, you have a point my friend. It just seems a little too early for this guy to try installing alternate OS's on a router when he isn't even sure which one to buy. At his own admission, the OP said he knows little about them.

    -Mike