Wireless !! Tones!

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by jieshi, Dec 10, 2002.

  1. jieshi


    Mar 26, 2002
    I just bought myself a wireless set (AKG guitarbug 40)
    and i realised thhhat it kills alot of tone !

    is it just me ?
    if so anyways to remedy it ?
    maybe using a Aguilar outboard preamp ? u guys think it would help ?

    many thanks in advance!
  2. Wareyin


    Jul 13, 2002
    Nope, it's not just you...most wireless systems are for 6 string guitars only. My 7 string playing guitar player gave up on his wireless because it sucked out his low end.
    Sorry to say, but the only way to remedy it properly is to get a wireless that can handle bass frequencies. The Senheiser Digital one can, the Samson Airline Bass one can, and I hear that a Shure unit can.
  3. DaRange


    Mar 12, 2001
    Minneapolis MN.
    go with the shure ut14 performance series it's transparent.:D
  4. neptoon


    Jul 25, 2000
    summerville, sc
    try looking for a used x-wire...i always thought these things were great, but they were discontinued. :mad:
  5. I notice a bigger difference in "FEEL" than tone. I think the added circuitry of the wireless delays things just enough to change the way it all feels. My Samson rackmount ( I can't remember the model number ) doesn't seem to change the tone much. I'd been using it for several years and had gotten use to it when for some strange reason I used a cord to play a gig. Everything just FELT better to me. I haven't used the wirless since..:D
  6. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Shure UT. Now Shure UHF Performance Gear. If you'd've done a search, you'd've known that you need a unit whose frequency response goes down to 40 hz for 4-strings and 30 hz for 5-strings. Not many do, but the Shure UHF goes down to 20 hz. BTW, avoid Shure's LX and ULX series for bass, especially the "Pro" model. It lacks the requisite frequency response.
  7. LJW


    Feb 8, 2002
    northeastern pa.
    Wireless for bass; you really do need to get a good one.

    Good ones are not cheap.

    Munji is right, be aware of freq. response.

    BTW, Shure ULX (both S and P systems) operate 25hz to 15khz +/-2dB
  8. redneck2wild


    Nov 27, 2002
    Memphis, TN
    I have not found a wireless yet that I like for bass.
    They all cut out the lowest frequencies and sound tinny. Notes on a B string don't have any punch.

    There is a FAQ on Shure's website on using wireless with Bass:

    Samson has a new wireless for bass called Airline Bass:

    I have not heard one but it looks promising. The specs on the airline series only has an audio frequency down to 50hz (just like most UHF wireless models) which still would not handle a 31hz B. The special tone circuit on the Airbass may be boosting frequencies below this on the receiver end (where you enable the Bass "Shape" setting) to adjust for the degraded signal.
    Since Samson owns Hartke, they do have a stake in meeting Bass players needs.
  9. Wareyin


    Jul 13, 2002
    Where did you hear that they only go down to 50Hz? I played one, and it sounded as good as the cable in the music store. Also, I couldn't figure out what the shape control was supposed to do. I couldn't tell a difference no matter what setting it was on. I think the 50Hz frequency responce is for the guitar model, not the bass model.
  10. redneck2wild


    Nov 27, 2002
    Memphis, TN
    The system manual PDF on the Website has the info.
    It lists the audio frequency response as 50hz-15khz on the AG1 transmitter. The same transmitter is used for both the guitar and bass models. It is the receiver that is different.
    I know several Bass players that can not tell any difference between using a cable and a wireless and it is usually because the cabinet that they are playing through does not produce bass frequencies in the 30-40Hz range. They are used to only hearing the 1st overtone through the cabinet because that is what it is producing. Many cabinets with 10" speakers do not reproduce a 30hz B very well or even a 41Hz E - even 8x10 cabinets.
    Look at Ampegs specs on SVT-810E - 58Hz-5KHz.
    I use either 1 or 2 1x18 cabinets when I play just to get the low frequencies that I expect.
  11. Wareyin


    Jul 13, 2002
    Ampegs suck, anyway(I had to run through an Ampeg 810 once...total tonal hell). I use Hartke 410xl's...they list their frequency as going down to 30Hz. I didn't buy the airline system, so I don't know what it sounds like on my rig, but I ran it through a 15 speaker cab at the store.
    I could definately hear a difference between my guitar players tone with a cable and a Shure wireless system through his rig, and don't tell me that his 412 guitar cab puts out more low end than a bass cab. I could also hear the tone suck of my old wireless system, so I went back to cable.
    Like I said, I couldn't tell a difference from the shape setting when I used the airline bass, but I suggest that you try one out before you tell me why I can't tell hear a difference.:rolleyes:
  12. redneck2wild


    Nov 27, 2002
    Memphis, TN
    As I said in the first post "it looks promising".
    I mentioned the specs that Samson had posted on the website was from 50Hz-15khz. This was not my "opinion" but specifications provided by the manufacturer.
    I was not cutting on the product but brought the product up.
    There will always be a degree of tone change between a wireless and a cable as there is an amount of loading between pickups and the amp when directly plugged in. Even different cables have different characteristics. Take a Moster cable and compare it with a very cheap cable to see a difference.
    I also happen to like the sound of certain Ampeg amps in certain situations and have played through many I liked and a few I did not.
    I too own a Hartke 410 cab (for 10 years) but mine can not put out the deep bass I need so I run it in a biamp mode for the Highs (at 100hz) and 18s for the lows.