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Wiring new pickup

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by fenderbassabuse, Apr 13, 2004.


  1. I need some advice on wiring my dimarzio model P into my squier P-bass. I am able to do high quality soldering and have all the resources to do so.
     
  2. I'd mount it up and wire in a switch or push/pull volume or tone pot to switch between series and parallel....
     
  3. squire_pwr

    squire_pwr

    Apr 15, 2003
    San Diego, CA.
    Hey, fenderbassabuse, if you have the time and inclination, could you write us a review when you finish putting in your pickups? I also have a squier p-bass and have been toying with the idea of putting in some new pickups, but have no idea as to how to choose one, since you can't exactly play it before you buy it... =) TIA if you do, and if not, no worries. Enjoy the pickups!!
     
  4. Yeah I'll happily reveiw the pickup, but it is a '77-'79 model-P, so I think it might be uncommon. What sort of music are you into squire pwr? What is your favourite playing style?

    Shall I just wire it up as it was then?
     
  5. squire_pwr

    squire_pwr

    Apr 15, 2003
    San Diego, CA.
    that's a pretty old Squier. Although, I have no idea how old my Squier is, so it might be just as old. =P most likely not though. aww.... anyway, as for music, I like rock, punk, emo, and I usually like how the bass sounds in them. One that stands out would be the Alien Antfarm bassist's tone, which is awesome. But I also like the punchy bass of Green Day and other such bands. Playing style, I usually play finger style with two fingers (3 fingers gets out of hand), but I have no hesitation to go with a pick. Right now, my complaint with my bass is that it's too plain... it doesn't seem to have bottom or punch I'd like. So, hopefully, new pickups will help!

    And for the wiring, the explaination on the dimarzio website did nothing for me, so I can't say. Although, I'm not really too sure what parallel/series wiring does in the first place, so... =P
     
  6. I have been instructed that the Seymour Duncan SPB-3 pickup is very big and punchy due to the frankly massive pole pieces in it. Maybe a set of the EMG P could be finding its way to your bass? You will need a 9v battery though and last time I checked, there is little room in the control cavity. Ask around here, the guys are very friendly and are more than happy to tell you what they know.

    My squier is being vintaged, so that is why a DiMarzio from the late '70s is going in a 2001 bass. Would look a little odd, cream pickup on a white pickguard, sunburst finish and a rosewood board. Is this a rare find? What price would you pay for one in good condition?

    Should all be ready by tuesday night. Mmmm, a pickup 10 years older than me! (if its a '79 that is.)
     
  7. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    I'd stay away from the SPB-3 in favour of the SPB-2, the Hot for P -- in most cases. I've heard from a couple of techs that they end up taking more of these things out of basses than any other non-stock pickup, because you just can't get the strings far enough away from them. The output MIGHT be what you're looking for, but for a LOT of people, it ends up being way too much. The SPB-2 has a similar tone from what I've heard from other people (I've never used a QP'r, only the Hot), only its not as high output. I have it on my fretted bass, and I find that the passive tone is great for most things (the charts on basslines.com comparing tone are VERY accurate -- these things have big bottom) and if I need a different tone, I've got an aguilar 3 band preamp in there to adjust things around.

    Squire pwr should however definitely keep the SPB-3 in mind for his stuff with punk and rock. The high output is perfect and it punches through VERY well. Not as suitable for too many other stuff, but it works very, very well for that kind of stuff. Also, later on if you've got some extra cash, an Aguilar 2-band onboard preamp is really great. The bass boost on it and the other model (3 band with sweepable mids) is just phenomenal! Big, round, and thunderous. Really a great buy. The 2 band is boost only, but in most cases mid controls aren't very necessary (a lot of people, including Roger Sadowsky, just don't like the way three band preamps sound compared to two), and it's a hell of a lot cheaper. The list price is on www.aguilaramp.com . You wouldn't have to do any extra drilling, you could just have a volume knob (push-pull for active/passive, there's a bit of a volume boost in active) and a stacked knob for bass/treble boost. There might be some routing required for batteries, p-bass cavities are damn small.
    EMGs are also another really great way to go. I suppose a good comparison would be that Seymour Duncan grinds, and EMG bites. They've got some serious sonic teeth, and sound fantastic. Plus, they contain everything you need with the pickup itself (wiring diagram, pots, pickup, foam, etc.) while SD just packages the pickup.

    Something to watch out for -- the little tabs you put the screws in on SPB-2 and SPB-3 pickups are smaller than standard fender sized ones, so you might have to drill new screw holes. The same screws'll fit, but the tab thingers don't extend as far out. It also leaves a bit of space for dust to get in the control cavity.
     
  8. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    But those aren't fancy and don't say Basslines on them ;) :p . Never even thought of that solution, actually...








    ...I'm a little slow :(.