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Wiring pups direct to imput jack?

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by bassbully43, Nov 7, 2005.


  1. bassbully43

    bassbully43

    Jul 1, 2005
    Is this possible? I thought i read somewhere here it can be done and can sound good. I have a SX P i modded with new pots and pups and the more i do the worse it buzzes...i checked all the grounds and they are good so if i bypass the tone amd volume ( i keep them wide open anyhow) will this work? I would guess the sound would be just like the Vol./tone pots wide open...will it still buzz...i re-grounded the bridge also.
     
  2. michele

    michele Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2004
    Italy
  3. bassbully43

    bassbully43

    Jul 1, 2005
    Wow :eek: What an awsome looking bass...looks so cool without the knobs.....so i can ...cool...i guess if my ground problem is in my wiring ....by bypassing it i will know if it is in the pots or wiring...cant wait to here how it sounds bypass cuz i hate the hum/buzz my mad modding has created. I like my 2-vol 1 -tone features on my jazz bass but on the P its wide open and play.
     
  4. rumblethump

    rumblethump Supporting Member

    Mar 25, 2000
    Pioneer CA. 95666
    First, recheck your wiring. It sounds like something is not right. Cold solder, ground wire? A P bass pickup shouldn't buzz or hum. Is the ground wire attached properly to the bridge?

    The answer is yes to your original question, but having the ability to adjust volume and tone on the fly is important to me.
     
  5. bassbully43

    bassbully43

    Jul 1, 2005
    Rumble i agree a P bass shouldnt humm at all. I really never adjust my P bass tone...my Jazz yes P no. but i am not satisfied with the noise problem. I will re check the wiring again....i could try re soldering all the grounds. The ground wire was lying flat under the bridge...i wraped it in a tight half circle and put a bridge screw thru it and tightened it all down...didnt help the buzzing at all. I wonder if i remove all the ground wires that are soldered to pots and star ground them to one wall of the cavity that i will line with shelding tape? might work...i kinda wish i would of left the bass stock now...i created a nightmare of noise.
     
  6. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    FWIW:

    I went from a wall of basses with active electronics, to pulling the preamps and running them as outboards, to getting rid of them all together and going straight to jacks. I stand by the amp so don't need onboard controls. 90% of the pups I played that way (probably 20 sets or so) sounded better skipping onboard controls. I'd read the more components the signal has to go through the more it is degraded, and I found that to be so. And it doesn't matter whether it's an active or passive harness. If you set up and A/B them, the tone gets filtered through pots.

    With a pair of pups, you need to go stereo, but with a P bass, that's not a problem. Wiring the pup straight to the jack will let you know if the hum is the pup or your harness. Although the jack could be an issue as well, your cord, your amp, your location.
     
  7. SirPoonga

    SirPoonga

    Jan 18, 2005
    same thing with me. I have a squier p. There's a hum. But if I move sometimes there's feedback. I gotta take the a look, my guess is my jack is back. I did take the bass apart when I first got it and made sure everything was wired correctly, and it wasn't. The tone cap was on the wrong lug.
    I still get a hum. My guess is maybe I will need shielded wires and/or copper shielding.
    The feedback, I think, is due to maybe the jack being bent or something. I used two different cords, same thing happens.

    FYI, wiring the pickup directly to the jack is the same as having the volume and tone open. They are potentiameters, the more you turn them the more resistance. Open no resistance, just like if ther ewas nothing there.
    I'd like to see a knobless bass but you have to use a pedal for the volume, tone, active eq, etc... I think it would look cool.
     
  8. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    FWIW:

    Not the same to my ears. Even if you had no-load pots, the current still has to flow through the pot and that ain't the same.

    You don't need pedals if you're by the amp/rack. And a decent amp has more flexibility in tone with less adjustment than can be had with any onboard control system I'm aware of. But no knobs is not practical if your not around your amp unless you use a programmed setup or pedal board. Even then, half a bit of creativity and you could mount whatever to a mic stand - can't say as I've ever seen that done but I gaurantee somebody does it.
     
  9. dave120

    dave120

    Jun 27, 2005
    Central Florida
    Just a random thought but make sure your cables are good! One of my bandmates forgot his guitar cable at last practice and the only one I had to give him was the one for my tuner, which is a cheapo generic one that comes with most guitars. If he moved he would feedback and buzz all over the place. It was a good way to keep him from getting in my way though since he had to stand still :D
     
  10. bassbully43

    bassbully43

    Jul 1, 2005
    well iam using the same cable as always and even tryed my new monster cable that im saving for gigs stil had hum...i get alot of problems from the dimmer in the room but even turned off and my amp plugged in another room still hum...i understand the hum in my jazz has but when you touch the bridge etc there is no change and it is pretty quiet. The P bass buzz and gets loud as soon as the bridge is touched its quiets some...if you touch the pickup post man...noise city. i bypassed the harness and pots and went stright to input jack...BUZZ.............so now what is it the pickups? must be i guess so much for duncans then...i resoldered it all since i can decrease the buzz with my tone pot...i might need to get this looked at...what sucks is the duncans are not that much better than the stock SX pups...i thought id get all fancy and change them and the pots and it went from a great sounding bass to a buzz machine ...i guess i suck :rollno:
     
  11. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    FWIW:

    if you got buzz wired straight to the jack then it has to be somthing still in the signal chain (which doesn't include the pots/harness in that scenario). You swapped cables so that pretty much rules the cable out. It is common practice for the pickup ground to be in contact with the poles. When that's the case, a pup that's properly grounded would buzz less not more when the poles are touched. You might try reversing your leads regardless of what the color code states and see what you get. Also is your jack a mono (two terminal) or stereo (3 terminal).

    I had a Duncan hot P once that I liked the tone but made racket. I shielded the bass, made up ground plates, and over time went through myirad of trials. I posted on TB and seemed nobody had that experience with the same pup. I ended up dipping it in wax since I'd never messed with dipping before and thought what the heck. It shouldn't have resolved a 60 cycle hum issue and it didn't when I stuck in back in the bass. So I pulled it and later put in back in and there was no hum then. So who knows.

    If nothing else, you can always put the orignal stuff back in as it was since it sounds like it wasn't that bad anyway.
     
  12. bassbully43

    bassbully43

    Jul 1, 2005
    Thanks for the help...so you say reverse the wires BLK/White to see if this is the problem...huh never thought that. I have a friend i will take it to ..he repairs electronics also.....i give ..im sick of soldering and testing :meh: But putting back all the parts dont seem like a bad idea...but a lost of money it will be.
     
  13. mgmadian

    mgmadian

    Feb 4, 2002
    Austin, TX
    Sure, you could wire the pups straight to the output jack... as others have mentioned, you will probably notice the difference, likely for the better IME.

    I've had several basses modded so that the volume knob has "all-pots-bypass" capability: pull up the knob to bypass the volume and passive tone pots, sending the signal straight to the pickup selector (which I have in my basses).

    I usually prefer to bypass the pots (unless of course I need them to roll off volume or treble! :D), as the sound has more highs and is more organic and responsive to my ears. Occasioally it can actually be too bright, esp on my main 71 Jazz with the pups in parallel (when I put the pups in series, I prefer the bypassed position). Reaallly made a difference with my old G&L L-2500, and also with a Stingray5 I had this done to. "Opened up" the sound in general.

    That said, the change in sound between the 'regular' and 'bypassed pots' modes on a Fender Roscoe Beck 5 I had this done to was very subtle.
     
  14. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    FWIW:

    I meant reverse the wires at the jack not between the pups. In other words black (ground) to jack tip (hot) and white hot to jack ground. It may or it may not make a difference.

    If that doesn't work then you can try reversing the wires between the pups (not the leads coming from the pup which would makes no difference - the wires are the same, changing the color would only change the color).
     
  15. bassbully43

    bassbully43

    Jul 1, 2005
    would grounding the pups help? how do i do that?...thanks for all the help.
     
  16. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    FWIW:

    if you're talking about grounding plates, it may or it may not. At any rate, one step at a time, you'd want to do the wire swap at the jack first.

    If that doesn't work then you'd need to pull the pups to swap the leads between them. That would be the time to rig up grounding plates since you could do both at the same time and it would save you having to pull them again if the wire swap didn't work.
     
  17. Moo

    Moo Banned

    Dec 14, 2002
    Oakland, CA
  18. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    FWIW:

    Yes the proper connection does matter, the color doesn't. You can desolder those leads from the pup, swap them, make the identical connection as before and it would be no different (except the color).

    Common sense will tell you to go by the color code for installation. But if there's a problem post installation then to make an assumption without verifying the reality is asking for grief.

    I have known of wires that were crossed on the pups from the maker, electronics wired incorrectly from the factory, windings crossed, etc. Different manufacturers have different color codes and often will swap color codes within their own pups. For Duncan J stacks, black is positive not negative. Add an employee having a bad day, disgruntled sabotage, equipment failure, and who knows what you'll get.

    NO ASSUMPTIONS in trouble shooting.
     
  19. Moo

    Moo Banned

    Dec 14, 2002
    Oakland, CA
    Click the link ;)
     
  20. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    Yep, it was from taking similar tumbles I learned not to make assumptions - yet I still find myself doing it occassionally. The last time I smoked an amp so I'm guessing I should be good for a while now.