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Wood splitting around the skunk stripe...will this be expensive?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Ghost Signal, Apr 19, 2010.


  1. Hey all. I just found a Fender Jazz V Plus on CL for $350. Snatched it right up, possibly a little too quickly. Got it home and found some splitting and cracking on the back of the neck around the skunk stripe. It doesn't seem to affect the sound or playability, but the little razor-sharp burr on the neck is a little off-putting. So I was wondering if someone could give me a ballpark on what it would cost to get this fixed proper.

    Here are some pics:
    100_2569.

    100_2568.

    100_2567.

    100_2571.

    100_2573.

    100_2574.

    100_2575.
     
  2. AltGrendel

    AltGrendel Squire Jag SS fan.

    May 21, 2009
    Mid-Atlantic USA.
    I'm waiting for the first "It's beyond repair, send it to me" joke.:meh:


    Have you though of just filling it with super-glue and doing some buffing?
     
  3. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Not superglue!!!even the gel can creep through to the rod and foul the rod. Use eithe epoxy or titebond dark with some wood dust mixed in to thicken, allow to dry for 24 hours then smooth. Wait a week while playing to see if any more filling will need to take place, if not procede with finish work.
     
  4. John Ruiz

    John Ruiz

    Oct 9, 2000
    Plano, Tx
    I wonder if the truss rod is too tight and trying to push the skunk stripe out? :confused:
     
  5. Any way I could find that out for sure without messing up the current playability. I'm no expert on set-ups and such, but I know that it plays great right now. I just don't like the feel of the crack.
     
  6. AltGrendel

    AltGrendel Squire Jag SS fan.

    May 21, 2009
    Mid-Atlantic USA.
    Yea, my bad. I'm still learning about this stuff.:(
     
  7. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Not bad at all AltGren...Thick CA is always a good choice to fill voids, fast, easy, and strong, I have just seen CA get to rods on things like this, wanted to warn Ghost, good thought about the rod too, John, this is a possibility worth looking at.
     
  8. Rocky McD

    Rocky McD

    Jun 28, 2005
    San Antonio, Texas
    Builder,mcdcustomguitars
    I don't think the wood is spliting, I think the original glue that was applied to the skunk stripe was not sufficient and it now has a gap from normal wood expansion. I would fill it with CA. I don't think you would ever put enough CA in there to get to the truss rod.
    Rocky
     
  9. Rocky McD

    Rocky McD

    Jun 28, 2005
    San Antonio, Texas
    Builder,mcdcustomguitars
    The truss rod pushes up on the fretboard side of the neck not downward toward the skunk stripe. I have seen several Fenders with this same problem. It looks like someone has tried to fill it before.
    Rocky
     
  10. John Ruiz

    John Ruiz

    Oct 9, 2000
    Plano, Tx
    I agree that it seems to be that the glue joint around the skunk stripe has become inneffective, but I think before putting ca in there, which could lead to trouble with the truss rod, I'd use a thicker adhesive which is less likely to seep into places it wasn't intended to be. I'm no expert.

    Is the sharp edge simply that you can feel the gap between the woods or is the edge of the skunk stripe actually sitting higher than the other wood? If it's sitting higher, I'd relieve the tension from the truss rod, place titebond/epuxy with dark wood dust and clamp (not too hard) the skunk stripe to make sure it's level with the back of the neck. This would require setting the bass up again when you're done, but if you add glue to keep the stripe where it's at now, and it's raised at all, you'll just be making the problem permanent.

    Again...see last sentence of 1st paragraph. Good luck!
     
  11. That's what I thought too. Maybe this is an ongoing problem with this instrument and that's why I got it fairly cheap?

    I'd like to keep the original neck rather than go through the hassle of trying to find a matching replacement, or getting an aftermarket replacement. Any ideas on a way to permanently solve this, or should I take it in and let a pro try their hand? Any idea on what that would cost?

    Thanks for the replies so far.
     
  12. It's the edge sitting higher than the rest of the neck. The one side of the stripe is raised a little near the top, then it levels out, and down near the middle, the other side starts to jut out, and that's where the big split is. Also, near the neck joint, it looks like there's a little cracking along the grain, but it's just barely noticeable.
     
  13. Stone Age

    Stone Age

    Apr 13, 2008
    Connecticut
    Other guys familiar with repair would know better, but unless the joint is fixed, the glue is just going to be filler. It won't hold anything together.

    If it gets worse, that area may need to be routed out and a new piece inlayed back in.
     
  14. It's beyond repair, send it to AltGrendel.
     
  15. sloasdaylight

    sloasdaylight Banned

    Feb 4, 2009
    Tampa, Florida, US
    Beat me to it.
     
  16. Tell me you're not serious.
     
  17. Shame, it's a really nice looking bass :(
     
  18. I hope it's not a lost cause to try and repair the neck. I guess, if nothing else, Warmoth makes necks with the same style headstock...
     
  19. AltGrendel

    AltGrendel Squire Jag SS fan.

    May 21, 2009
    Mid-Atlantic USA.
    He's not serious.

    :smug:
     
  20. Beej

    Beej

    Feb 10, 2007
    Victoria, BC
    I'm with Rocky on the "seen it before". Probably close to half a dozen times in fact. I know I looked one over just like this for a friend years ago and when we were talking about it, I asked him how long ago it had developed. Without cracking a smile, he said his Dad had noticed it shortly after he bought it new over 20 years ago! Well, with 20 years mileage on a "cracked" neck, I figured nothing else was probably going to happen to it and we just rubbed a little glue and dust to fill the void and sanded it smooth. Done.

    Who knows exactly what the deal is with yours, but it sure looks similar. Is everything else about the bass perfectly playable? Do you notice the neck bending while you play and move around? It may not need a repair other than cosmetic, but I'm also with others that if you can fill it, its best to explore the options.

    If it were mine, I'd probably remove the neck, back off the trussrod completely, test clamp it to see if I could get the crack to seal up through clamping, and if so, I'd glue it and clamp it. If it didn't seal up in the test clamp, I'd probably look at filling it with a mixture of maple dust and glue and then sand it smooth later. As another said, your mileage may vary...
     

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